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^qil ont'^ci oupjO 'JVWOiliL 




VOL.25 No. 16 



Thursday, January 7, 19!>3 



'f^m^ 



3W 




ICE SCULPTOR Alfred George stands with his creation, a 10-foot ice castle, in Quincy 
Square during the city's inaugural First Night, celebration. George's son, Eric, helped 
make the impressive decoration, other First Night Photos Page 2 ,p^^^^ . ^. 

Next Celebration To Be Even Bigger 

Quincy ^s First Night 
A Crowd Pleaser 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

Saying that the city's 
First Night festivities last 
week were "an 
overwhelming success that 
exceeded all 

expectations," First Night 
Committee Chairman 
Michael Cheney said 
Tuesday plans are already 
underway to make 
Quincy 's next New Year's 
Eve celebration even 
bigger and better. 

Cheney, who expressed 
great enthusiasm over the 
success of last Thursday 
night's events, said he was 
confident that the second 
annual First Night in 
Quincy could be an 



improvement over the first. 

"I talked to a number of 
people at the event," said 
Cheney. "It became very 
evident throughout the 
night where improvements 
could be made." 

Cheney noted that one 
of the most important 
changes next year will be 
an increase in the amount 
of food served. He said 
while approximately 1,000 
meals were served at one 
of last week's most 
popular events, an 
International Food Festival 
at the Quincy Center for 
Technical Education 
(Vocational School) Gym, 
having more food on hand 



next year would be a wise 
idea. 

"I'd like to triple the 
amount of food next year," 
he said. "I'd also like to 
increase the number of 
street entertainers, so that 
people on the outside can 
be entertained while 
they're standing in line for 
food" 

Cheney added that he 
would like to increase the 
number of corporate 
sponsors supporting First 
Night festivities, noting 
that a Sponsorship 
Outreach Program will 
begin next month. 

Still, Cheney said the 

(Confd on Page 2) 



Public Information Session 
For Storm Victims Saturday 



Ward 1 Councillor 
Peter Kolson announces 
that a public information 
session will be held for 
residents who e}q)erienced 
flooding and other 
problems during die recent 



northeaster. 

The session will be 
Saturday from noon to 4 
p.m. at the Adams Shore 
Library, Sea and Pahner 
Sts. 

Officials from the 



mayor's office and 
building, planning and 
health departments, as 
well as Kolson, will be on 
band to qpeak to residents. 

All are welcome. 



Public Safety, New School 
Construction 1993 Top Priorities 

Sheets Declares City 
'Economically Sound' 

By STEVE KAVANAGH 

Proclaiming Quincy "economically sound" during his mid-term address 
Monday, Mayor James Sheets said the city is now ready to bolster police and fire 
protection and begin new school construction. 

Sheets announced that 



goals for 
include: 



the future 



• Increase fire 
department personnel to 
the 1990 level. 

•Expand the police 
department's Special 
Operations Unit. 

•Expand the crime 
prevention program. 

• Downtown retail 
development. 

•Increased tourism. 

• Creating a new 
governance structure for 
Quincy College. 

•Creating a commission 
on families. 

•Consolidating func- 
tions from various city 
departments including 
purchasing, personnel, 
maintenance, and 
inspections. 

Reorganization and 
cutting the cost of 
government have been the 
keys to overcoming budget 
crisis' in recent years, 
Sheets said. 

"The city of Quincy is 
solvent and economically 
sound. And as I prepare the 
fiscal year '94 budget for 

(Cont'd on Page JO) 




"WE HAVE BEEN successful because we have set aside 
traditional political fears and have worked for the 
common good of the citizens of Quincy," Mayor James 
Sheets said during hJs mid-term address Monday. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



Reaction To Mi(l-Term Address 



Cahill: *We'reNotOut 
Of The Woods Yet' 



City Councillor-at- 
Large Timothy Cahill 
criticized Mayor James 
Sheets plans to increase 
spending in the next fiscal 
year. 

Otherwise, members of 
the City Council reacted 
favorably Sheets' mid-term 
address Monday and 
echoed the mayor's 
feelings of optimism for 
1993. 

"I don't think we are out 
of the woods yet 
economically," Cahill 
said. '1 don't think we can 
base our budget on rosy 
projections from the state 
of Massachusetts. We 
should still be cautious." 

"The mayor does reflect 
the optimism of everyone 
that the economy is 
turning and the city is 
going to keep advancing 
inch by inch to a place 
where we want to be," said 
Councillor-at-Large 
Patricia Toland. "We have 
weathered the storm 




TIM CAHILL 

fiscally but we still have 
to be prudent. We have 
things on our ageixla and I 
think we'll complete them. 
I think the mayor's 
leadership is excellent," 
Tolatxi said. 

"If things are so good 
we should give some of 
the money back to the 
taxpayers or lower taxes," 
CaUU said. "We've raised 
taxes every year under the 
Sheets administratioiL" 



Cahill said several city 
departments are 

outspending their budgets 
just halfway through the 
fiscal year. 

"We will h'»ve to dip 
into the fiee cash account 
and that will make things 

tight if there is an 
emergency," Cahill said. 

Auditor Robert Foy 
confirmed that the Police 
and Public Works 
departments are spending 
at deficit levels. 

"Overtiine is up in the 
police department because 
of stepped up coverage 
and a shortage of 
patrolmen," Foy said. He 
also said the DPW was 
spending more than 
expected because of the 
recent stonn. 

"We should have 
enougb money in free cadi 
to take care of (police and 
DPW budget shortfalls), " 
Foy said. "Particularly if 

(ContdonPagtlO) 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, Jaauary 7, 1993 




AN ECUMENICAL SERVICE was held in United First Parish Church as part of 
Quincy's First Night celebration. Among those who participated were, from left. Rev. 
Cornelius Heery, Sacred Heart Church; Imam Talal Eid, Islamic Center of New 
England; Rev. Alicia Corea, Houghs Neck Congregational Church; Mayor James Sheets; 
Rabbi David Jacobs of Temple Beth El; Rev. Sheldon Bennett, United First Parish; Rev. 
Richard Law, WoUaston Lutheran Church; and Rev. Maureen Christopher, Light of the 
World Community Church of Religious Science. 




STUDENTS OF CHINESE Quhicy School perform folk dance at the South Shore YMCA 

during First Night In Qulncy. .„, 

* «" V J (Photos by Sky} 



Quincy's First Night A Crowd Pleaser 



(Cont'd from Pagt 1) 

success of Quincy's initial 
First Night celebration is 
what makes him so eager 
to begin work on the 
second. He estimated that 
between 13,000 and 
15,000 people visited the 
16 indoor sites and three 
outdoor tents that were 
among last week's 
festivities. 

"It was a very, very 
Mendly atmosphere, and 
that's exactly what our 
objective was," said 
Cheney. "A family- 
oriented, non-alcoholic 



evening that could be fiin 
for everyone. 

"The crowd, from what 
I could gather, was equally 
divided between people 
who had never attended a 
First Night before and 
those who have gone to 
Boston's in the past. I 
beard nothing but positive 
comments about all of our 
events and most people 
stayed right up until the 
midnight fireworks at 
Faxon Field." 

The success of the 
evening, Cheney said, was 
due mainly to the 



teamwork of those who 
helped organize and 
oversee the event. 

"Everybody pulled 
together," said Cheney. 
"Our volunteers and 
coordinators from the First 
Night Committee, workers 
and officials from the 
various city departments, 
and all of the sponsors. 
Everybody did an 
excellent job." 

He added that the 
media coverage of WJDA, 
The Quincy Sun, The 
Patriot Ledger and 



Continental Cablevision 
was also an important 
reason for the large 
attendance at the 
celebration. 

Cheney said those who 
missed the festivities may 
get to see them after all, 
noting that Continental 
Cablevision is planning to 
put together two videos, 
one on last week's 
celebration and the other a 
promotion for the second 
annual First Night. 

Regarding the next First 
Night celebration, Cheney 
said plans are being made 



to hold a second aimual 
First Family Day at Faxon 
Field. The first such event, 
held last May 17, helped 
to offset the cost of First 
Night, according to 
Cheney. 

Cheney also said a call 
to artists who wish to 
attend the second annual 
First Night "will be put out 
no later than April." He 
added that preference will 
be given to local artists. 

Finally, Cheney said he 
will be taking suggestions 
from anyone wishing to 
offer any input on the 



Night 



upcoming First 
celebration. 

"A number of public 
officials who observed the 
event made notes and will 
back with 

recommendations," he 
said, "but I'm also taking 
suggestions from the 
general public." 

Those with suggestions 
or questions regarding the 
second annual First Night 
in Quincy can contact 
Cheney at Quincy City 
Hall, City Council Office, 
1305 Hancock St., Quincy, 
MA 02169. 




WOLLASTON GLEE CLUB sings a song in New City Hall atrium during Quincy's First FORBES SCHOOL OF Irish Dancers aot in c#-„ a • 

Ni»l.t rpl*hr««l«n Vocational-Technioal SoK^i ___":. ^" '". . P ""'■'"g » performance at 



Night celebration 



Vocational-Tech nioal <:<>h»»i »„ 7 * *^ "unng a performance at Quim 

Technical School gymnasium as part of Quincy's First Night entertainment 



Quincy 




'AN fcVtJVING OF MOZART' featuring Anna Soranno, soprano, center, and conductor CHILDREN ARE ENTERTAINED bv th R 

Yoichi Udagawa, right, and meoibaY of the Boston Philharmonic perform at Bethany *^uslcal Petthis Zoo" at <;anth ct.«-- » Jv "eechwood Community Life 
- - » ^^^^ ^'•®" "■" foyer during First Night to Quincy. 



Center's 



Congregational Church daring Qotocy's First Night celebration. 



(Photo by Sky) 



I 



Wants Quincy College Governance Clarified 

Johnson Withdraws As 

Presidential Candidate 

At Eastfield College 



Thursday, January 7, 1993 Qnlncy Sun Page 3 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

Expressing his strong 
desire to help institute a 
new governance procedure 
at Quincy College, 
President Dr. O. Clayton 
Johnson has withdrawn as 
a presidential candidate at 
Eastfield College in 
Dallas, Texas. 

Dr. Johnson has been a 
strong advocate of 
clarifying the college's 
governance or "chain of 
command." Presently, 
Johnson reports to the 
school superintendent, a 
process some local leaders 
believe interferes with the 
needs of the city's K-12 
school system. 

Johnson and other 
clarification proponents 
want the college to be 
placed under a board of 
trustees which would 
implement and oversee 
college policies, thereby 
leaving the Quincy School 
Committee to concentrate 
on non-college education 
matters. 

Johnson has been 
president at Quincy 
College since 1983. 
During his tenure, the 
college has doubled 
enrollment, not raised 
tuition in four years, 
opened a new campus in 
Plymouth and other 
satellite campuses, and 
diversified minority and 
international student 
enrollment to more than 20 
percent. 

Financially, the college 
has flourished, despite the 
recent recession. In fact, 
the college has been an 
economic beacon, not a 
financial burden, to 
Quincy. In his 10 years, 
Johnson noted the college 
has paid the city more 




O. CLAYTON JOHNSON 

than $S million to operate 
the school. 

"These things have 
been accomplished but 
clarification of governance 
has not," Johnson said. 
"It's a complex problem 
that has not been solved. I 
find it's my responsibility 
to stay on until it's 
finished. 

"Then I can make a 
decision on my future," he 
added. 

In September, 

Councillor Tim Cahill 
proposed a home-rule 
petition which, if adopted 
by the city and state 
legislature, would place 
Quincy College under a 
board of trustees. The 
proposal has the support of 
several officials, including 
Mayor James Sheets. 

Johnson said he made 
his decision to remain at 
the request of political 
leaders, board members, 
students, colleagues and 
personal friends. He 
expressed his personal 
desire to complete 
governance planning by 
March and begin new 
governance oversight on 
July 1. 

Johnson met with 
Eastfield College officials 
three times, including two 
visits to the Dallas 



campus. Eastfield 

representatives travelled 
once to Quincy to meet 
with him. 

Johnson said he was 
invited to return to 
Eastfield last month and 
meet with the college 
chancellor but decided to 
withdraw before making 
the trip. "I was not offered 
by job. 1 withdrew before 
that point. 

"I was seriously 
considering it. The last six 
months have sort of led me 
to that," Johnson said. 

Last fall, Johnson was 
suspended for five days 
without pay by School 
Supt. Eugene Creedon for 
allegedly threatening him. 
After a disciplinary 
bearing in November, the 
School Committee voted 
to suspend Johnson for 
two-weeks without pay for 
"conduct unbecoming" to 
an employee of the Quincy 
school department. 

Johnson maintains he is 
innocent and is 
considering a civil rights 
suit against the school 
committee for racial 
discrimination. Johnson, 
the only black 
administrator in the city's 
history, is the only city 
employee not to receive a 
raise in four years. 

In light of what has 
occurred over the past six 
months, Johnson said his 
family wanted him to take 
the Eastfield College 
position if it were offered. 

"My family has been 
tormented by newspaper 
articles. They voted to go 
to Texas." Johnson is 
married and has four 
children, two grown 
children living in 

(Cont'd on Page 10) 




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BRAINTREE • Emmanual Parish • 519 Washington St. • 617-449-3994 
Thursday, January 7 • Saturday, January 9 
3 mQS.-16mos.9:30am • 1 Yr.uDto5Yrs.10:30i 



^Saturday School' 
For Project 2000 Students 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

Many 11-year-olds are 
concerned with paper 
routes. Little League and 
video games~not getting 
ready for coUege. 

But that's exactly what 
some Broad Meadows 
Middle School sixth 
graders will be doing this 
spring. 

Students who graduated 
from Snug Harbor 
Community School last 
year are part of Quincy 
College's Project 2000 
which guarantees tuition to 
the college for those who 
graduate from high school 
in the year 2000. 

The project also 
provides educational 
incentives to the sixth 
graders between now and 
2000. A "Saturday School" 
program is plaimed for this 
spring for the sixth graders 
and will be held at Snug 
Harbor. The program will 



also be open to sixth 
graders from Snug Harbor 
who are enrolled in the 
advanced placement 
program at Central Middle 
School. 

Beginning this spring, 
enrichment classes will be 
offered each semester 
which will last from eight 
to ten weeks. The classes 
will be instructive and 
entertaining and will 
attempt to build a "love of 
learning" and a sense that 
learning can be fun. 

Suggested activities 
include science 

experiments, working with 
computers, exploring 
careers, guest speakers 
and local field trips 
(including a trip to Quincy 
College). 

Dean Richard Pessin of 
Quincy College and Broad 
Meadows principal Gerald 
Butler have developed an 
outline for support 
programs for the Project 



2000 students which 
includes the Saturday 
classes. 

A middle school 
teacher will be hired to 
develop the lessons and 
teach the classes. 
Members of the college's 
student honor society will 
also work with the 
students. Quincy College 
wiU pay for the program. 

Quincy College will 
also sponsor one field trip 
each semester for the 
students. Suggested trips 
include visits to museums 
and the theater, a whale 
watch, etc. 

The college will also 
offer a free class at Snug 
Harbor for the parents of 
Project 2000 students. 

"We are very excited 
and pleased with the 
college's investment in our 
young people," said Dr. 
Carol Lee Griffin, assistant 
superintendent of Quincy 
Public Schools. 



Estimated $153,821 In Wire Permits 



The Quincy Wire 
Department of Inspection 
issued 133 permits for an 
estimated cost of $153,821 
in wiring during 
November, reports Wire 
Inspector Thomas Puipura. 
During the month, there 



were 38 certificates of 
approval to the 
Massachusetts Electric 
Company and $3,825 in 
permit fees. 

In addition, there were 
261 inspections, 25 
reinspections and 57 



defects noted. 



GRANITE 
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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 7, 1993 











Tl^« 0^±>xo3r &^^ 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co , inc 

1372 Hancock St , Quincy Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworlh Jr . Publisher 
Robert H Bosworlh, Editor 

30t p«r copy. $12.00 p«r year by mail in Quincy 
$14.00 par yaar by mail outsida Quincy. $17.00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 <.71-3i02 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun. 1372 Hancock St . Quincy Mass 02169 

The Quincy Sun assumes nc (inancial responsibility lor ' Ek^r^ '• 
typograptiica' errors m advertisements tXJt will reprint that c^eA^nf^ 
part ot an atfveri:serrent m which the typographical error ^^mTl- 
occurs ^^9^ 


1 





FROSTY THE SNOWMAN visits with 31/2-year-oId 
Anthony Barbera during the recent Marina Bay 
Christmas Festival. 

{Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Quincy Art Assn. Holding 
Workshop On Basket Weaving 



Quincy Art Association, 
26 High School Ave., will 
hold workshops on 
Nantucket Basket 
Weaving two consecutive 
Saturdays, Jan. 30 and 
Feb. 6. 

Fee is $85 for members, 



$105 for non-members. 

A Watercolor 

Landscape Workshop with 
Lee Parsons will be held 
Saturday, Feb. 13 from 10 
a.m. to 4 p.m. 

For more information, 
caU 770-2482. 



Medically 
Speaking 



by Michael M. Bakerman, M.D., FA.C.C. 




DON'T PAY MORE FOR LESS 



When a landmark study 
reported that one regular- 
strength aspirin tablet 
taken every other day can 
help prevent heart attacks 
in some people, thousands 
of heart disease patients 
cheered. For those whose 
doctors have 

recommended aspirin 
therapy, it pays to keep a 
few consumer facts in 
mind. Aspirin is simply 
acetylsalicylic acid. It 
doesn't matter whether 
you buy it under a costly 
name brand or an inex- 
pensive generic label, 
me meaicaiion is the 
same. Also, beware of 
products that offer half the 
usual aspirin dose, usually 
at many times the price. If 
your doctor has 
recommended a half dose 
for any reason, an 
inexpensive pill splitter, 
available at most 
pharmacies, will deliver it 



handily. 

P.S. Never take aspirin 
regularly without asking 
your doctor. Prescribing 
such treatment for 
yourself could be 
dangerous. 

There is really no 
reason to pay more for a 
brand-name prescription or 
non-prescription drug 
when the pharmaceut'cally 
identical, much less 
expensive alternative is 
available. If you would tike 
to learn more about this 
topic, or about how you 
can modify your lifestyle to 
help ward off heart 
disease, call 

COMPREHENSIVE CAR- 
DIAC CARE at 472-2550. 
Office hours are by 
appointment at 1 01 Adams 
St., Suite 24, in Quincy. I 
am affiliated with Quincy 
Hospital and South Shore 
Hospitals. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Council *Seat Warmer'? 





Councillor Patricia Toland appears to have the 
assistant City Clerk vacancy wrapped up and it 
will become official this month. 

But it still leaves some speculation — and a little 
intrigue — over who will get to fill the council at-large 
seat she will be vacating. 

Toland reportedly has lined up 
enough votes among her council col- 
leagues to take over the $3 1 ,000 assis- 
tant clerk post. Five votes are needed. 

She probably will be elected at the 
Jan. 1 1 City Council meeting. 

Former Mayor-Councillor Joseph TOLAND 
LaRaia sometime ago staked out a claim for the seat if 
Toland got the assistant clerk's job. 

But now there's talk of a possible "seat warmer" — 
someone who would fill out the unexpired term and not 
run for the seat this fall. 

LaRaia feels he is the rightful 
one to take the seat as runner-up in last 
year' s city election. He finished fourth 
behind Toland with Tim Cahill first 
and Michael Cheney second. LaRaia 
was 1,913 votes behind Toland. 

LaRAlA The vacancy would have au- 

tomatically gone to LaRaia if a resolve introduced by 
Toland more than a year ago had been passed. The 
resolve which called for a vacancy to be filled by the 
runner-up in the previous election was shuffled into a 
committee and never came back out to be acted on. 

There are mixed feelings about the resolution. Some 
feel it has, a drawback because it would automatically 
put into office a candidate who didn't make it with the 
voters in the previous election. 

And, by giving a defeated candidate an office the 
voters would not give him , places him in an incumbent- 
like status for the next election. 

Those in favor of the resolution argue it would 
eliminate behind-the-scene politicking. And, give the 
seat to a person who had the interest to run for it in the 
previous election. 

Latest word around City Hall is that LaRaia is not 
alone in seeking the seat. Ron 
lacobucci who has run for the City 
Coimcil in the past, reportedly has 
some support. 

Those leaning toward a "seat ^^ 
warmer" stress that it would leave it iacobucci 
up to the people to make the call this fall. 

QHS Parent Advisory 
Meeting Jan. 12 




Quincy High School 
Parent Advisory Council 
will meet Tuesday, Jan. 12 
at 7:15 p.m. in the Pride 



Room at the school. 

All parents and teachers 
are welcome to attend. 





Quincy 

Pound 

Adoptables 

Poodle, mature male, white, friendly. 
Lab-Terrier mix, male, 1 1/2 years, 60 pounds, 
black with white chest, friendly. 
^ Shepherd-Husky mix, male, 2 years, white and 

V tan, friendly. 

V Shepherd puppy, female, 5 months, black, white 
I and brown, fiesty, no small children, great dog with 
y training. 

^ Officers Phyllis B«rlucchi and Bruce DiBella, 376- 
< 1364. Daily hours 8:30 am-4:30 pm except Sunday. 
I Adoption and reclaiming hours 8:30-2:30 am 
\ and 3:30-4:30 pm. 





One name b eing mentioned is Frank Kearas, popu- 
lar community activist. Keams is not 
seeking the seat, but he has support 
among some of the councillors. 

If Keams or someone else got 
the seat just to hold until the fall, it 
would mean an open at-large seat in 

KEARNS this year's city election. A seat one or 
two of the present ward councillors would no doubt run 
for. Which, of course, would then open up one or two 
ward seats. 

Ah. politics. Sure beats baseball. 

Q 

TIME HEALS EVERYTHING. Or, so it seems. 

Former Mayor Walter Hannon, Joseph LaRaia and 
Francis McCauley were among the guests at Quincy 's 
mid-term ceremonies. 

Long-time City Hall observers couldn't help note 
LaRaia and Hannon who slugged it out in one of 
Quincy's all-time mayoral campaign brawlsin 1975, 
were sitting side by side Monday. 

"Not too long ago," one observed, "McCauley would 
have had to sit between them." 

□ 

WELL DONE: Councillor Michael Cheney was 
delighted with the success of Quincy 's 
first First Night New Year's Eve cel- 
ebration which he headed up. And, 
well he should be. 

It was an ambitious undertaking and 
hardly a sure thing. The big question 
was: would it fly? Being this close to CHENEY 
Boston could Quincy compete in the crowd drawing 
department? Quincy, it turned out, could, attracting 
thousands to Quincy Center. And, the nice part about 
it was that a good section of the crowd were Moms and 
Dads and children all enjoying a family fim night 
together. 

No alcohol. No problems. 

Cheney and his committee who put a lot of work into 
the project, deserve a "Well Done." 

□ 

INCIDENTALLY, New Year's Eve coincidentally 
was also a "milestone" birthday for Cheney's wife, 
Tish. 

"Boy," someone said to Cheney, "you sure know 
how to throw a birthday party." 

□ 

RETIRED QUINCY POLICE off icer Bill Draicchio 
is home after undergoing heart surgery at New England 
Medical Center, Dec. 21. He's feeling "fine" and is 
getting in some walking. Draicchio is now an election 
worker at City Hall 

U 

LOOKING FOR A Quincy T-shirt or sweatshirt? 

Check Caryn's Comer in Quincy Square. Some real 
beauties. 

Six different T-shirts depicting: the Presidents John 
Adams and John Quincy Adams Birthplaces, the Adams 
Mansion, Adams Academy, historic First Parish 
Church, City Hall and the Thomas Crane Public Li- 
brary. 

Three different sweatshirts: Adams Academy, the 
Crane Library and the City Seal. (The latter also comes 
in a golf shirt.) 

Owner Caryn Smith says the shirts are fast sellers 
and are going around the world. Tourists have been 
buying them and they are also being sent as gifts to 
Quincy men and women in the military service. 




'IMtedW^ 

CF MASSACHUSETTS BAi' 



Thursday, January 7, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 5 



From Quincy, Calif. To Quincy, Mass. 

Cyclist Plans Cross- County Trek 
To Help YMCA Youth Programs 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

How far would you go 
to help others? 

Phil Dandrow of Milton, 
with the help and support 
of the South Shore 
Y.M.C.A. in Quincy, is 
going 3000 miles-by bike. 

That's right. Dandrow, 
32, president of the 
Lexington Chandler Group, 
a marketing firm, is 
planning to cycle cross- 
country solo from Quincy, 
Calif, to Quincy, Mass. 
this June to raise money 
for the Y's youth services 
and programs. 

Dandrow, who recently 
discussed his trek with 
Mayor James Sheets, said 
he got the idea from Dr. 
Richard Shubert at Eastern 
Nazarene College during a 
dinner held at the college. 
Dr. Shubert, a member of 
the ENC Board of 
Trustees, told the 
gathering that everyone 
has a responsibility and an 
obligation to help others 
through community and 
volunteer service. 

"Dr. Shubert basically 
said it's time for everyone 
to pay the rent. And I said 
to myself, yes, it is time," 
Dandrow explained. 

In particular, Dandrow 
said be is concerned about 
youths using illicit drugs. 
He said adults should 
come together and offer 
youngsters other outlets, 
such as recreation. 

"I think there has to be 
some alternatives offered 
to these kids," Dandrow 
said. 

Throughout his trip, he 
said he plans to contact 
teachers and public 
officials and inform them 
of this effort. To increase 
awareness even more. 
Sheets said he will notify 
the U.S. Conference of 
Mayors to alert the 
mayor's of cities which 
may be on Dandrow 's 
route. 




CYCLIST PHIL DANDROW, center. Mayor James Sheets, and Tricia Fell, executive 
director of South Shore Economic Development Corporation, glance at a map of the 
United States. Dandrow plans to cycle from Quincy, Calif, to Quincy, Mass--3000 miles- 
in June to raise money for the South Shore YMCA's youth programs. Fell is chairman 
of the cycling event. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 



"We're at a crossroads 
and I really feel people 
have to get behind this sort 
of thing. It's going to 
come back and help all of 
us," Dandrow said. 

He said he hopes his 
transcontinental trek raises 
$101,000 for the South 
Shore Y.M.C.A. 's youth 
programs. The figure is 
symbolic of the Y's 
existence; this year, the 
charitable organization 
marks its 101st year. 

He said he will try to 
reach that goal through 
corporate sponsors and 
individual pledges. 

Sheets described 
Dandrow as a positive role 
model for today's youth. 
"I think that it's so critical 
to make sure that the 
character of young people 
stays sound. There's just 
literally thousands of 
young people looking for 
role models. 

"It gives young people 
a sense of mission beyond 
themselves." 

Although he has not 



finalized a departure date 
yet, Dandrow said he will 
start his journey next June 
from Quincy, Calif., 
located in the northern part 
of the Golden State near 
the Sierra Nevada 
Mountains. He expects 
the first leg will be the 
most difficult 

"The biggest challenge 
will be early on with the 
Rocky Mountains and the 
deseit. After that, I'll have 
the wind behind me." 

Where will he go fi-om 
there? "I plan to draw a 
straight line on the map," 
he replies with an hearty 
grin. 

Dandrow, a cycling 
novice, is training for his 
two-wheeled excursion 
with the help of the South 
Shore Y.M.C.A.'s facilities 
and staff, notably fitness 
expert Dr. Wayne 
Westcott. As part of his 
conditioning program, 
Dandrow bikes about 50 
miles a day. 

"It's been very 
beneficial to me. It's a 



great way to get some 
exercise." 

He figures he'll finish 
his journey in 30 days by 
riding approximately 100 
miles a day. 

And although he'll be 
the only one riding that 
bike, Dandrow realizes his 
trip would not be possible 
without the help and 
encouragement of the 
South Shore YMCA, 
namely Tricia Fell, 
executive director of South 
Shore Economic 

Development Corporation 
and the head of the 
cycling event. 

"It wouldn't be possible 
without the whole team," 
he says. 

Fell said the South 
Shore Y.M.C.A. will 
conduct a "name the trip" 
contest "to get people 
excited in it and involved 
in it." 

Fell also said the Y is 
seeking volunteers to help 
coordinate the trip. 
Anyone interested can call 
her at 479-1111. 



Job Applications Being Accepted 
At Adams Site Jan. 17-22 



The National Park 
Service, Adams National 
Historic Site is accepting 
applications for full-time 
and part-time seasonal 
employment for its 1993 
season, April 19 to Nov. 
10. 

Applications will be 
accepted Jan. 17 to 22. 

The Adams National 
Historic Site includes the 
birthplaces of the Second 
and Sixth U.S. Presidents, 
John Adams and John 



Quincy Adams. Also 
included is the Adams 
Estate which was the 
home of both presidents, 
America's Civil War 
Minister to England 
Charles Adams, Uterary 
historians Henry and 
Brooks Adams and their 
families. 

The estate includes the 
"Old House," the Carriage 
House, the family library, 
and various other buildings 



of the period. The site also 
includes a downtown 
visitor center and 
inteipretative programs at 
United First Parish 
Church, where the crypts 
of the presidents and their 
first ladies are located. 

Park rangers greet the 
public, conduct 

interpretative 

presentations, and 
maintain scrutiny of and 
protect the park resources. 



To be eligible for 
employment, applicants 
must be at least 18 years 
of age and submit their 
applications to the Adams 
National Historic Site 
between Jan. 17 and 22. 
Notification of 

employment will be by 
Feb. 22. 

Applications may be 
received by calling Adams 
National Historic Site at 
773-1177. 



Cub Scout Pack 25 
Bottle Drive Saturday 

School School parking lot, 



Merrymount 
Cub Scout Pack 25 will Agawam Rd. 
hold a bottle drive 
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 
p.m. in the Merrymount 



Proceeds will be used 
for pack activities. 




BUY U.S. 
SAVINGS BONDS 



Quincys 
Yesterdays 



Jan. 7-13 

1928 

65 Years Ago 



Crime Rise Concerns 
Temperance Worker 

Dr. Anna Door Bryant, state superintendent for social 
morality of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, told 
members of the Wollaston branch that she was concerned 
about the rise in crime in America. 

"We are told that there never was such an age of criminal- 
ity and that the United States - 
produces more criminals than 
any other country in the 
world," she said at the 
WoUaston Methodist Church. 

"We feel that our courts of __^______________^ 

justice have lost their grip on 

things. Why are criminals so plentiful? We are not enforcing 

our laws as we should. 

"A great many who should be restrained are let out on 
probation too many times and while they are out they commit 
Climes over and over again." 

BEACH UNDERPASS SOUGHT 

Mayor Thomas J. McGrath testified in support of a bill 
filed by Sen. Henry L. Kincaide to constnict an underpass 
under Quincy Shore Reservation from the bath house to 
Wollaston Beach at Sachem St. 

Sea Kincaide told the hearing that from 14,000 to 20,000 
people cross the four lanes of traffic is particulariy dangerous 
for children and old pec^le. 

Waits of 10 to 15 minutes to cross the street are not 
uncommon, be said. 

BUTLER POND RESCUE 
Arthur C. Dunham, 23, of 56 Spear St., dove fully clothed 
into the waters of Butler Pond to rescue Peter Kondos, 3, son 
of Charles Kondos of Merrymount Rd. from drowning. 

Dunham was driving by the pond in the rear of Central 
Junior High School when he heard the child screaming for 
help. He dove to the bottom, grabbed the boy and pulled him 
up. Both were covered with mud. 

SEEKS EARUER MAIL 
Richard Rowles, superintendent of the Wollaston Post Of- 
fice, appealed to the Boston Postmaster to provide more 
space for mail on the 8:56 am train to Quincy. 

Cuircntly,the first diiectmailofthe day between WdJaston 
and Quincy was placed on the 10:53 am train, which often 
did not arrive in Quincv until after 1 1 am. 
QUINCY-ISMS 

A group of residents are circulating a petition to diange 
the name of Houghs Neck to Manet Beach ... Herbert E. 
Curtis was re-elected president of the Quincy Trust Co ... 
"His Dog," starring Joseph Schildkraut and Sally Rand, "the 
vivid story of man and his best friend," was playing at the 
Alhambra; also Ken Maynard in "The Devil's Saddle," and 
a chapter of the serial, "Perils of the Jungle" ... Some 15,000 
people attended the first public inspection of the Quincy built 
airplane cruiser Lexington at the South Boston Army Base ... 
Edward A. Gisbume, the former Daily Ledger reprater who 
won a Congressional Medal of Honor at Vera Cruz, ^fexico, 
was iq>pointed staff announcer at WEEI, the Westingbouse 
Edison Electrical Illuminating Co. station in Boston ... 
Theoi^us King, president of the Granite Trust Co., cel- 
ebrated the 50tb anniversary of his first election to the board 
of directors of the Granite National Bank ... Fresh poik roast 
was 21 cents a pound and Maxwell House coffee was 54 
cents a pound at Foy's Markets, 39 Franklin St, South 
Quincy, and 1259 Hancock St ... Residents of Atlantic asked 
the public works commissioner to close Old Colony St fot 
coasting ... Frank A. Goodwin, registrar of motor vehicles, 
reported that there were nine highway deaths in Quincy in 
1927, up from six in the previous year ... Cong. Louis A. 
Frothingbam filed a bill in Congress "that the use of sub- 
marines be prohibited and their c(Mistruction discontinued in 
this and every other country" ... QuirKy Kiwanians held their 
weekly meeting in the Elks GriU and presented a substantial 
purse to Frank H. Foy, who had served as lieutenant govemw 
of the New England district for the past year ... The Citizens 
Traffic Committee met in the Chamber of Commerce Hall to 
determine the attitude of Quincy Square merchants in regard 
to the one-hor restriction on parking ... A 1927 Essex coach 
was $535 at Sylvester and Carson, 68 Washington St ... The 
Park Department was asking bids to set up a toboggan chute 
in the Blue Hills Reservation off Willard St ... Elizabeth Man- 
was installed as president of the Gertrude A. Boyd Auxiliary, 
United Spanish War Veterans, at GAR Hall .... Nine flavors 
of homemade ice cream were on sale at the Howard D. 
Johnson Co., 93 Beale St, Wollaston, aaoss fix)m the depot. 



r 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 7, 1993 




Marie's 
Kitchen 



By MARIE J. D'OUMPIO 



John Q's Pasta Toss 



When our nephew John Q. from New 
York (hairdresser to the stars) called us 
last week to say he was coming over to 
our home, the first thing I did was to fix 
my hair. 

The second thing I did was to take 
some tomato sauce out of the freezer. 
When he arrived, knowing he loves 
"gnocci", my husband obliged by making 
the pasta for him. 

As we sat in the kitchen with the 
sauce bubbling and the pasta in the 
making, John gave us one of his favorite 
recipes. I was surprised that a man who 
lives such an exciting life traveling all 
over the country meeting celebrities 
would actually have the time and 
inclination to cook. Today's recipe is a 
great way to serve linguine. 



JOHN Q'S PASTA TOSS 

1 Lb of linguine (or a favorite pasta) 

2 cloves of garlic (chopped) 
1 small onion (chopped) 

1/2 pound fresh mushrooms (cut) 
1/2 pound or so of broccoli florets 

3 medium sized fresh tomatoes 
(preferably plum tomatoes) 

Grated romano or parmesan cheese 

3 Tbsps olive oil 

1/2 stick margerine or butter 

(optional) 

In the hot oil and margerine, saute the 
garlic and onion. Add the broccoli and 
cook for a couple of minutes. Add the 
mushrooms and cut up fresh tomatoes 
and cook until done, (takes about 15 
minutes in all). Toss over linguine and 
sprinkle with grated cheese. It's a 
delicious as well as a healthy entree! 



Bag Sale Jan. 13-23 
At Bureau Drawer Shop 



The Bureau Drawer 
Thrift and Gift Shop, 776 
Hancock St., will bold a 
Bag Sale Jan. 13-23. 

The shop is run for the 
benefit of the Protestant 



Social Service Bureau, 
776 Hancock St., which 

offers counseling, child 
placement and shared 
living for the elderly. 



Hours are Wednesday 
through Friday from 9:30 a 
m. to 3:30 p.m. and 

Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 
pjn. 



Seton OB/GYN Associates 

of 

St. Margaret's/St. Elizabeth's 

announces the opening of the 

Roslindale office with 

Paul J. Hull MD and 

Shah Naderi, MD, MPH 

New patients are now being accepted. 

Please call 617-323-1084. 
1 Corinth Street, Roslindale 




MAYOR JAMES SHEETS presents a $500 gift certificate from Home Depot in West 
Quincy to Jim and Lois Belmonte of Quincy for contributing the one-millionth penny 
during a recent penny drive held by the Quincy Park Improvement Committee. QPIC 
is a volunteer organization that has raised approximately $40,000 to reftirbish Quincy's 
only centrally located playground, CoUins-Rest-A-While, with state-of-the-art play 
equipment for city children. On hand for the presentation were, fk-om left, Dan 
McLaughlin, QPIC member; Planning Director Richard Meade, QPIC Chairperson 
Michelle Lydon, Mayor James Sheets, Jim and Lois Belmonte, with their children, 
Elizabeth, 2 1/2 and Ashley, 1 year; and Ray Cattaneo, director of Quincy Park, Forestry 
and Cemetery Departments. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 

25 Quincy Students Included 
In The National Dean's List 



Twenty-five students 
from Quincy are among 
the over 118,000 students 
included in the ISth 
annual edition of The 
National Dean's List just 
published by Educational 

Communications, Inc., 
Lake Forest, 111. 

They are: 

Jonathan F. Bertoni, 
Merrimack College; 
Joanna M. Carty, Mary R. 
Dababneh, and Christine 
M. Donovan, all Newbury 
College; Geoffrey O. 
Hatch, Quincy College; 
Lisa A. Hourigan, Newbury 
College; Heather L. 



Meaney, Quincy College; 
James W. Mitchell, 
Suffolk University; Robert 
J. Murphy, Quincy 
College; Deborah A. 
Showstcsd, Aquinas 
College at Newton; Jacob 
C. Sutton, Boston 
University; Lynne R. 
Swanson, Aquinas College 
at Milton; Huy D. Tu, 
Bunker Hill Community 
College. 

Rorence E. Capone, 
Susan M. Colby, and 
Laurie M. Craig, all 



Davis, Boston University; 
Kristin F. Hacco, Eastern 
Nazarene College; Janice 
A. Kelly, University ot 
Massachusetts at 
Dartmouth; Anita Lang, 

Newbury College; Amy E. 
Manning, Quincy College; 
Annie S. Mui, Boston 
College; Karen M. 
O'Sullivan, Lesley 
College; Elizabeth A. 
Quimby, University of 
Massachusetts at Boston; 
Angela Venezia, Boston 
College. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Quincy College; Amy E. 

Mr. Mrs, Robert Macintosh 
Parents Of Son 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Grandparents are Mr. 
Macintosh of Boston are and Mrs. David Macintosh 



parents of a son, Andrew 
William, bom Oct. 22 at 
New England Medical 
Center, Boston. 




of Quincy and Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard Menelly of 
Burlington, Conn. 

Edmund Sharp IV 
On Newman Honor Roll 

Edmund J. Sharp IV, Edmund Sharp IH of 73 



son of Mr. and Mrs. 



RECEPTION HALLS 



rYLiSN120-SEAT 

DBCOVBONEAR 

MARMABAY. 

THOWHTTOBE 

The seoct's out 

! function room at Amelia's 

I has bacomt one of Boston's 

I most popular spots for u«d- 

drigs, shouBs. coiporate 

meetings, and get togethcrs 

of all ktrids. VJt feature an 

I extensive menu at affordable 

prices UfecK«Tlook Mama 

I Bay and the Boston skyline 

We'd like to make your next 

function really fly. 

Please caD 617471 1453. 



i 



AM E-LIAS 



k/ictory Rd. Ma Quincy, MaI 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasior}s 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



MUSIC 



LIVE MUSIC 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Art Perry, His Saxophone 

and Orchestra 

Featuring 

Music of the 30s and 40s 

843-7878 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



TRAVEL 



HONEYMOON 

IN ROMANTIC SCOTLAND 

H Castle or Cottage « 

Scottish Connections 

304 Victory Rd., Marina Bay 

fi17.77Q4172 2m 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography ^ 

679 Hancock Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-«888 



Quincy 

Choral Society 

Chamber Chorus 

479-2061 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



JEWELRY 



^Ol50n Rne Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family Al - Dave - Mark' 

730 HANCOCK ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 



MEASURABLE 
ADVERTISING! 



SPONSOR 



Welcome Wagon directs 
prospective customers to 
your door with personal- 
ized, measurable adverti- 
sing to: 

• Engaged Couples 

• New Parents 

• Moving Families 

We reach them in their 
homes, usually by request, 
when they're in a buying 
mood. We tell them all 
about your business. 
Interested? Call for more 
details: 

Ba[t>ara Nawrot Mendfiz 
479-2587 



"^^O^^OfL 



Saratoga St., North 
Quincy, has been named 
to the honor roll at 
Newman Preparatory 
School in Boston. 

To qualify for this 
honor, a student must 
maintain an average of 85 
or higher for the first half 
of an academic session. If 
this achievement 
continues for the entire fall 
session, the student is 
appointed to the Dean's 
list. 



JIMMY JAY MUSIC 



Quaranteed Lowest 

Prices on Cassettes, 

CDs and Records 



690 HANCOCK ST -nan 

WOLLASTON 479-7080 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun iiome delivery 
route. 

Teiepiione: 
471-3100 




Thursday, January 7, 1993 Quiocy Sun Page 7 

Mary Ryan Quincy Hospital 
Employee Of The Month 



MR. and MRS. JOSEPH CICCOLO 

Mr., Mrs. Joseph Ciccolo 
Celebrate 50th Anniversary 



Mrs. and Mrs. Joseph 
Ciccolo of West 
Bridgewater, formerly of 
Quincy, recently 

celebrated their 50th 
wedding anniversary. 

A surprise reception 
was held at the Braintree 
Knights of Columbus and 
hosted by the couple's four 
children: Phyllis Cosgrove 
of South Weymouth, 
Robert Ciccolo of Hansen, 
Joseph Ciccolo of 
Braintree and Virginia 
Snell of East Weymouth. 

Rev. Leo X. Lynch, a 
former priest at St. John's 
Church in Quincy, 
renewed the couple's 



wedding vows at the 
reception. 

Mrs. Ciccolo is the 
former Jennie Salemi. The 
couple were married Jan. 
31, 1943 at St. Rose's 
Church in Chelsea. They 
lived in Quincy for 32 
years before moving to 
West Bridgewater. 

Mr. Ciccolo is a retired 
mechanic and was 
formerly active in St. 
John's Holy Name Society 
in Quincy and the Quincy 
Sons of Italy. 

Mrs. Ciccolo is a retired 
cook for North Quincy 
High School. 

They also have eight 
grandchildren. 



KENNETH DiFAZIO and MAUREEN DORAN 

Maureen Doran Engaged 
To Kenneth DiFazio 



Mr. and Mrs. George 
Doran of Quincy announce 
the engagement of their 
daughter, Maureen, to 
Kenneth DiFazio. He is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Rocco DiFazio of 
Weymouth. 

Miss Doran, a graduate 
of Quincy High School and 



Boston Edison Company. 

Mr. DiFazio is a 
graduate of Weymouth 
High School, Maine 
Maritime Academy, 
Central Michigan 
University 



Mary Ryan, R.N., a 
member of the Quincy 
Hospital staff in a myriad 
of positions for 10 years, 
has been named the 
hospital's Employee of the 
Month for December. 

Ryan first worked with 
patients with respiratory 
problems on the old 
Hunting 2 and then moved 
to ICU. During this time, 
she took a training 
program which certified 
her to teach smoking 
cessation and stress 
management courses. She 
used this in her work with 
cardiac patients in the 
ICU, and was also able to 
run programs for 
employees in local 
businesses through the 
hospital's Occupational 
Health Service. 

"Mary never seems to 
get overwhelmed," said 
Nursing Administrator 
Doris Sinkevich. "She has 
a level-headed, calm 
approach to things, which 
was a real asset in the 
ICU." 

Ryan went on to 
become one of two 
members of the hospital's 



and Suffolk 

Univei^ity Law School. He L^ffXel^mentTerm' 

nr nfF°' rrTp'"""^ A^^-^g ^'^b co-worker 

, . for DiFazio & DiFaz.0 and ^arie Marechi. she 

Aquinas College, is an engineer for Yankee developed and taught the 

currently attending Atomic Elecmc Company. cunicuLi for the nursing 

Northeastern Umversity. , A July 1993 wedding is technician program in 



She is 



Quincy NARFE Meeting Jan. 11 



Quincy NARFE 

(National Association of 
Retired Federal 

Employees) Chapter will 
meet Monday, Jan. 11 at 
1:30 p.m. at the Torre Dei 
Passeri Club, 252 
Washington St., Quincy. 



Guest speaker will be 
Karen Griffin, RN, from 
Interim Health Care. Her 
topic will be "Health 
Care." 

The club is 

handicapped accessible. 



employed by planned. 

Quincy Seniors Attend 
Elks Christmas Party 

Mariano, Ward 6 
Councillor Bruce Ayers, 
and Ward 2 Councillor 
Theodore DeCristofaro. 

Dinner was served by 
the Ladies of the Emblem 
Club. 



Quincy Emblem Club Meeting Jan. 13 

Quincy Emblem Club Quincy Elks Home, 440 
will meet Wednesday, Jan. 
13 at 7:30 p.m. at the East Squantum St. 

Mr., Mrs. John Saville 
Parents Of Daughter 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hospital, Weymouth. 
Saville of Brockton are 
parents of a daughter, 
Francesca Marie, born 
Dec. 16 at South Shore 



Grandparents are Mr. 
and Mrs. Domenic 
Falcetta of Quincy. 




VSAVimS 



Am*cX(aB0M)5 



A number of local 
senior citizens attended 
the recent annual 
Christmas Party at the 
Quincy Lodge of Elks, 440 
East Squantum St. 

Mayor James Sheets 
greeted the guests along 
with Reps. Michael 
Morrissey and Ronald 

Scott Rothwell 
On Dean's List 

Scott Rothwell, 91 
Brook Rd., has been 
named to the Dean's List 
at Johnson & Wales 
University in Providence, 
R.I., for the fall trimester. 

He is majoring in food 
and beverage management 
at the school. 



BALLOONS & STUFF 



690 HANCOCK ST. 

WOLLASTON 

773-0690 



ASK FOR THE $29.95 
BALLOON DELIVERY 



1988. She and Marie 
continued to train new 
nursing department 
employees, including 
nursing techs, clinical 
aides, LPNs and RNs. 

They also provide 
training for all employees 
in risk management—fire 
safety, back safety and 
infection control-as well 
as continuing education 



».'.».'. I .!.l.I.JL.l. 1 J. 1 .'. I . » . I . ' . t . t . I J. I .». 1 . t . 1 . 1 . 1 ■ > . r . » . ; . » .J[.M, t J[. ! , 




Winfield 
Gift Emporium 



AFTER CHRISTMAS 
CLEARANCE 
25-50% OFF 
Selected Items 
Hours: Tues-Sat 10:00 am-5:00 pm 
Sunday 12-5 - Closed Monday 
853 Hancock St, Quincy 479-9784 



)l)Ji)LJuLJijiiJL>LJui*Ju!*XKAljiAji*XKAl 



Russell Edward's 



Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St., Quincy Center 
Video Duplication 
Special This \Neek 

Share Your Taped 
Holiday Memories 

472-7131 



A full service hair salon 

MONDAY 

Women's Special $20.00 

TUES & THURS 

Men's Special $13.00 

WEDNESDAY 
Perm Special 

Starting at $42.00 




MARY RYAN 

and CPR recertification for 
nursing staff. 

Ryan said she enjoys 
teaching, and feels that 
she plays an important role 
in maintaining quality care 
standards in the hospital. 

Over the past few 
months, Ryan has been 
working as nursing liaison 
to the hospital-wide 
computer conversion 
project. 

In May, she will 
graduate from the 
University of 

Massachusetts with a 
master's degree in nursing 
education. 

Ryan and her husband, 
George, have two 
daughters, Christine, 24, 
and Brenda, 22. They live 
in Quincv. 

ICE SKATING • 
CLASSES 

Children 

& Adults 

M.D.C. Rinks 




Cleveland Circle 

Everett 

Hyde Park Dedham 

Lyrui 

Medford FlyTin 

Medlord LoConif 

Milton 

Newton Bngkior. 

Ouincv 

Somervtiie 

Wcltham 

We« Ronbury 

\^*\«Tiouth 



7 Lessons 
S65 child. S75 aduli 

Starts January 

registration inio 

965-4460 

BAY STATE 
SKATING SCHOOL 







£e»tf 



Starting at $42.00 

Nail Tipping & Overlay $60 
All specials Include wash, cut and blowdry. Sculptured Nails $60 

Long hair slightly higher Pedicures $25 

Body & Facial Waxing Available 

We carry a full line of hair care products 



REDKEN KMS MC^US 



PFMJL Mn"CHELL 



ymatrix 



472-1060 

Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts., 1 Maple St., Quincy 



f 



Page 8 Qulncjr Sun Thursday, January 7, 1993 



Arts/Entertainment 




WINTER ICE SKATING classes will start the week of Jan. 10th at the WiUlam Shea 
Memorial MDC Rink in West Quincy. Professional instructor Aimee Barron (above) 
teaches beginner, intermediate and advanced students on figure or hockey skates. The 
seven-week series is $65 child, $75 adult. For registration information call Bay State Ice 
Skating School at the MDC, 965-44«0. 

(Anthony Lupo photo) 



5 Residents On Recording Of 'O Holy Night' 



Five Quincy residents 
are featured on a newly- 
released recording of "O 
Holy Night" by the Boston 
Boy Choir. 

They are: Timothy 
Kenerson, son of Mr. and 



^CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 
1/7-1/13 



ISCENTOFAWOMANJ 
(R) 

I2:isa30-7K)0-I0a5 

CHAPUN(PG-13) 

12:25- 3:30 -7K>O-1(h00 



HOFFA(R) 

NO PASSES 

12:30-3:2B-7K)0-«:S0 

FHI* SAT ONLY 12a) A M 

AMUPPET 
CHRISTMAS CAROL (G) 

11«)-2:20-4»«0 

TRESPASS(R) 

7^0-10:00 
FRIt SAT ONLY 12:0s AM 

[the BODYGUARD (R)] 

12:30-3»40-7«6-«M 
FRIli SAT ONLY 12:10 AM 

T0YS(PG-13) 

1V.40- 2:10-4:30-7:1fr«A 
FRIASATONLY 12:15 AM 

FaFEW GOOD MEN (R)1 

1 2:25 -3dS-7M- 9:50 
FRIt SAT ONLY 12:15 AM 

DISTINGUISHED 
GENTLEMAN (R) 

11 «0-2:1»4a>-7:30-10«0 
FRia.8AT0NLY12:1SAM 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Shows 

$3.75 

773-5700 



MEMBERS OF Diane Purdy's Children's Theatre Workshop rehearse for one of the 
group's six January productions which will appear at the Woodward School, 1102 
Hancock St., Quincy Center, Jan. 10, 16, 17, 23 at 3 p.m. and Jan. 24 at 7 p.m. For 
more information, call 472-9233. Quincy cast members include, from left. Amy and 
Jenny Gordon, Fabrice Montes, Sara Gordon, Stephanie Fields and Ashley Farrell. 

^Senior Beat' Wins Top Mass 
Cable TV Commission Award 



Mrs. William Kenerson of 
Norfolk St.; Steven Liu, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenny 
Liu of Elliiot Ave.; Owen 
Nestor, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
James Nestor of Berry St.; 
James Powers, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Wayne Powers of 
Captain's Walk; and 
Michael Spencer, son of 



Mr. and Mrs. Glenn 
Spencer of Babcock St. 

All are students at the 
Boston Archdiocesan 
Choir School, Cambridge. 

The Boston Boy Choir 
performs regularly at 
Tanglewood, Symphony 
Hall, and Carnegie Hall. 



Qi 



[uincy Art Assn. 
Winter Classes Start Jan. 25 



Quincy Art Association, 
26 High School Ave., will 
hold winter classes for 
eight weeks beginning Jan. 
25. 

Adult classes include 
oil, watercolor, sumi-e 
painting, portraiture, and 



oriental rug making. 
Children's classes include 
Artventure, paper 
sculpture, clay, and 
advanced art for older 
children. 

For more information, 
caU 770-2482. 



"Senior Beat," a 
Qu.ncy Community 
Television program 
produced specifically for 
Quincy 's senior citizens, 
was recently voted the 
best volunteer produced 
senior magazine series by 
the Massachusetts Cable 
Television Commission at 
its eight annual contest 
and awards ceremony held 
in Cambridge. 

The half hour monthly 
show is shown on Quincy 
Continental Cablevision 
Channel 3. John Noonan, 
chairman of the Quincy 
Council on Aging, is the 
program host and co- 



producer assisted by 
Darlene Mendoza, director 
and co-producer. 

In the state 
competition, the program 
competed with entries 
from TV cable companies 
from throughout the 
Commonwealth. 

One segment shown 
recently on the program 
was a 15-minute video 
entitled "Seniors: A Safter 
Neighborhood Is Up To 
You." It was produced on 
location in a Boston 
neighborhood by the 
Emmy award-wiiming Stan 
Getz Productions Inc. 
through a grant given to 
the State Division of 



Elderly Health by the 
Neighborhood Justice 
Network, a crime and 
violence prevention 
agency. 

The video is suitable for 
showing to senior citizen 
organizations and housing 
faciUties. Rental copies at 
no charge may be obtained 
by contacting Dr. Alan 
Balsam, Director, Division 
of Elderly Health, State 
Department of Public 
Health, 150 Tremont St., 
Boston, MA 02111 or by 
calling 727-2013. 
Arrangements can also be 
made by calling the 
Quincy Council on Aging 
at 376-1243. 



i 1%\%nL 



Our Own Homemade 
SEAFOOD 
CHOWDER 

9efvinQ 
FRESH nSH 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chanct to earn 
extra monay by building a 
Quincy Sun home dallvary 
routa. 

Talaphona: 471-3100 



Wendy's Fundraiser For 
St. Joseph School Jan. 11 



A fundraiser for St. 
Joseph School in Quincy 
Point will be held 
Monday, Jan. 1 1 from 5 to 



Your Chotea of 
Broiad or Frtad 

Everyday Special 

Open Breakfast 
Everyday Except Sunday 



HOURS 
Mon-Sat 6 a.m. 



■9 p.m. 



TAKEOUT ORDERS 
FAST SERVICE 

308 QUINCY AVE. 
CALL: 773-9654 



9 p.m. at Wendy's, 527 
Southern Artery. 

A percentage of the 
sales made during the 
above hours will benefit 



HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES & PIES 

"There's No Taste 
Like Homemade" 



the school. 

Highlights will include 
balloons, face painting, 
and an appearance by 
Wendy. All are welcome. 



Beechwood Center 



rf% 



68A BIRIngt Rd. 
N. Oulncy. MA 

472-8558 



Thursday, Jan. 7: Pre- 
Luncheon Exercise, 11:15 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14 BEALE ST 773-4600 



: 




Wed & Thurs Jan 6+7 

James Fenimore Cooper's 

TheLaatOfThe 

Mohlcans"(R) 

An action Adventure 
Eye's 7:00 only 



Starts Fri Jan 8 

Gary OWman- Winona Ryder 

"Dracula"(R) 

A Horror Drama 

Fri + Sat 6:55 & 9:20 

Sun-Thurs 7:00 only 

Mon & Tues Dollar Night 



ALL SEATS ^3.00 



a.m. Weekly Thursday 
Lunch, 11:45 a.m. call for 
reservations. 

Friday, Jan. 8: 

Walking Club with Nancy 
(three-mile walk), 9 a.m.; 

Gentle Walk, 10 a.m.; Co- 
ed Volleyball, cost $2, 
11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.; 

Line Dancing, cost $3, 1 
to 2:30 p.m. 

Current Events Club 
will meet the first 
Wednesday of each month. 

For information call 
471-5712. 



6Buccmp 



IHlsterSUB 




Pizza - Pasta - Subs 
Syrians - Salads 



Dine In or Carry Out, or Delivered 



62-64 Billings Road, No. Quincy, MA 02171 
Hot Line 328-9764 • 328-0266 FAX 786-9792 




^Rockin into the 90*s" 

D.J. STEVE KAVANAGH 
Music for all Occasions 



**Munc for people who 

take their fun seriously T 

773-4936 



330 On Central Honor Roll 



Thnnday, January 7, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Central Middle School 
lists 330 students on its 
first quarter Honor Roll. 
High Honors 
Grade 6 
Elizabeth Ashworth, 
Lauren Avalony, Maya 
Barahona, Elizabeth 
Bennett, Heather Brown, 

Paul Burke, Stacie Bush, 
Daniel Cannon, James 
Cantelli, Elizabeth Carten, 
Gen Chen, Ashley 
Crawford. 

Michael Demeo, Sarah 
Dinsmore, Sean Donovan, 
Allison Eyring, Michele 
Fafara, Ruth Fishman, Ian 
Fung, Mark Goodman, 
Brendan Griffin, Alison 
Haddad, David Haendler. 

Bardhyl Hajrizaj, Laura 
Hamilton, Amy Harper, 
Andrea Healy, Kimberly 
Huerth, Tanya Kurd, Paul 
Hussey, Meredith 
Hutchinson, Deirdre 
Jacobs, Christopher Jones, 
Patrick Kane. 

John Katsarikas, 
Michael Kelly, Jennifer 
Kenneally, Katherine 
Kesaris, Sarah Kiley, 
Alexander King, Quentin 
Lam, Helen Lao, Eric 
Leung, Meaghan Lewis, 
Courtney Lomond. 

Sinead Lovett, Paul 
Lutts, Leona Ma, Craig 
MacDonald, Adam 
MacMillan, Lisa 

Maconochie, Leanne 
Martin, Matthew Melchin, 
Alexis Miranda, Anthony 
Monaco, Jennifer Musso. 

Courtney Paquette, 
Matthew Penella, Beth 
Perry, Mark Peterson, 
Lauren Prague, Eric 
Rackauskas, Brian Radell, 
Michael Regan, Elizabeth 
Ryan, Stephen Ryan, 
Angela Scott. 

Kelly Scott, Meghan 
Spillane, James Sullivan, 
Elden Tarn, Jimmy Tan, 
William Tracy, Joseph 
Watson, Marianne Weiler, 
Nicole Weiler, Michael 
Whalen, Shirley Wu. 
Grade 7 

Kevin Ann, John 
Barron, Erin Bany, Alma 
Batac, Michelle Boncek, 
Jonathan Caliri, Paul 
Carney, Thomas Chan, 
Mary Chenette, William 



Connolly. 

Michael Costales, 
Patrick Coughlin, Brad 
Croall, Joanna CuUen, Jon 
DeLucia, Christopher 
DiMattia, Erin Djerf, Julie 
Dunn, Karl Ehrens, 
Marybeth Feeney. 

Joseph Flores, Justin 
Graeber, Pamela Gray, 
Michelle Jodrey, 

Katherine Johnson, Tracey 
Jurewich, Michael Kane, 
Rebecca Kelsch, Matthew 
Lebo, Sharon Lee. 

Bryan Linskey, Jennifer 
Look, William Ma, Amity 
Manning, Jeffrey Marks, 
Justin Marquis, Kara 
McSweeney, Jason 
Moreno, Jennifer Morton, 
Kelley Nee. 

Nyryan Nolido, Maura 
O'Brien, Jill O'Connell, 
Andrea Osborne, Marie 
Phan, Vincent Pivnicny, 
Andrew Risitano, Marisa 
Ross, Meredith Rugg, 
Nawal Saffarini. 

Sarah Satkevich, Leela 
Sbankar, Colin Shea, 
Edward Smith, Stephanie 
Sprague, Mark Stanton, 
Andrea Stevens, Katelyn 
Sweetser, Erin Torraey, 
Shannan Whalen, 

Christopher Wilkie. 
Grade 8 

Jennifer Austin, Mark 
Belanger, Timothy Brown, 
Jennifer Calkins, Lily 
Chan, Vivian Chan, 
Angela Chin, Jamie 
Christo. 

Erica Crawford, Mark 
Demeo, Eric Dickens, 
Cuong Diep, Sarah 
Downing, Amy Drysdale, 
Jay Emerson, Jill Fishman. 

Erin Flaherty, Stephan 
Gildea, Rebecca Gordan, 
Teuta Jajrizaj, Susan 
Haydar, Ashkan Hedvat, 
Nakema Howard, Carolyn 
Jarvie. 

Dianne Kane- 

McGunigle, Tina 

Katsarikas, Tommy Leung, 
Daniel Macheras, Lyrme 
Maconochie, Kelly 
Magnuson, Jon Mahoney, 
Lauren McLellan. 

Janine Miller, 

Christopher Moody, Jinkee 
Pacifico, Ann Petruccelli, 
Jill Picardi, Kosanna 
Poon, Laura Powers, 
Kathryn Quinn. 



Amanda Rork, 

EUzabeth Rudolph, Laura 
Shea, Erica Smith, Susan 
Solimini, Katherine 
Sullivan, Maureen 
Sullivan, Kathleen 
Swanton. 

Felicia Tarn, Jennifer 
Tantillo, Sean Tirrell, 
Wendy Trafton, Jimmy 
Wan, Robin Wise, Cindy 
Wong, Jenny Zhen. 
Honor 
Grade 6 

Joshua Ballard, Ryan 
Barrett, John Bertucci, 
Elizabeth Boc, Teresa 
Bollino, Christopher 
Burkhead, Vincent Chiu, 
Brian Correia, Thomas 
Daley. 

Robert Delaney, Beth 
Devin, Patricia Dixon, 
Christina Duncan, John 
Fakhri, Paul Foley, Eric 
France, Kevin Garrigan, 
Kristin Greene. 

Suzanne Gunnerson, 
Timothy Keating, 
Kathleen Keleher, 
Benjamin Kettleson, 
Christopher Lee, Nancy 
Lee, Elaine Leung, Jessica 
Linskey. 

Carole MacLeod, Ian 
MacRitchie, Steven 
Marks, Colin Martin, Ryan 
McGurl, Michael 

McLaughlin, James Parisi, 
Viet Phan, Alexis 
Pivnicny. 

Breeda Powers, Sarah 
Proto, Michael Racicot, 
Lisa Schwariz, Elizabeth 
Stone, Shirley Tan, Adam 
Tiro, Sarah Towne. 
Grade 7 

Justin Adams, Matthew 
Allen, Dawn Ames, 
Danielle Archer, William 
Armstrong, Sarah Beston, 
Andrew Bisconte, 
Christopher Bregoli. 

Kathleen Burke, 

Thomas Caldwell, Sean 

Ciavarro, Jane Collins, 

William Deshler, Irvin 

Diaz, Jared Downey, Jason 

Dunbar. 

Matthew Foley, Brian 
Frazee, JiU Garland, Kerri- 
Lee Gates, Carmela 
Guarino, Brian Hughes, 
Emily Infenera. 

Matthew Kazolias, 
Melissa Keefe, Michael 
Keenan, Mark Kelly, 
Adam Knowles, Leah 



QUINCY VISITING NURSE 
& HOSPICE 

Wishes To Thank The Quincy Sun 

For Its Support And Interest 

In The Q.V.N.A. HOSPICE PROGRAM 

The Q.V.N.A. HOSPICE Christmas Tree 

In The Sun's Window Honored In 

Remembrance Hospice Patients 

In A Celebration Of Life 
At This Special Time Of Year! 



Lorenzetti, Johnny Ly, 
Chrisfopher Mannix. 

Andrew Mauriello, 
Isabel Maziarz, Michael 
McEvoy, Matthew 
McLoughlin, Christie 
Myers, Meghan O'Brien- 
Ali, Patrick Pezzulo, Erin 
Rooney. 

Bethany Savela, 
Michael Stockdale, John 
Sullivan, Ka Mei Toye, 
Kenneth Tse, William 
Walker III, Elaina Wong, 
Bai Lan Zhu. 

Grade 8 

William Barron, 
Marianne Blaikie, Jennifer 
Bradford, Kari Ann Brown, 
Ryan Catarius, Holly 
Collins, James Conley, 
Paul Daley, Michelle 
Donnelly. 

Jessica Esdale, Pamela 
Farrell, Jennifer Faye, 
John Ferraro, Erik 
Goodrich, Jonathan 
Haddad, Ryan Herlihy, 
Paul Inferrera, Kerry 
Jellison. 

Michael Johnston, 
David Klingenstein, 
Dennis Kohut, William 
Kwong, Alex Lam, 
Melissa Lingoes, Melissa 
Lord, Outtara Ly, 
Christopher McDonough. 

Michelle McSorley, 
James Melchin, Lucas 
Mikula, Lauren MoUoy, 
Timothy O'Brien, Kenneth 
O'Connell, Christina 
Partridge, Meaghan 
Powers, William 

Robinson. 

Hillary Rogers, Bridget 
Sbaughnessy, Michael 
Starr, Alexander 

Stromberg, John Tormey, 
Melody Wass, James 
Wong, Annie Yu, Wingsze 
Yuen. 




GLORIA AND ROBERT Noble of Quincy (third and 
fourth from left) aUended the recent dedication of a 
plaque to American ex-POWs from Massachusetts. 
Robert Noble is the senior vice commander for the 
Department of Massachusetts ex-POWs. Joining them 
are, from left, Rep. Ronald Mariano, former Rep. and 
now State Senator Michael Morrissey, and Rep. A. 
Stephen Tobin. 

(Mark E. Kasianowicz photo) 

Merrymount PTO 
Offering Scholarship 



The Merrymount School 
PTO is offering its annual 
scholarship to any senior 
from the Qass of 1993. 

Applicants must have 
graduated from 

Merrymount Elementary 
School. Applications are 
available at the 
Merrymount School or 



High School Guidance 
Offices. 

Deadline to submit 
appUcations is March 9. 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Oulncy Sun home dallvery 
rout*. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Apollo Lighting & Electric 
Supply Company 

South Shore's Lighting Headquarters 
A Full Line Lighting and 
Electrical Distributor 
Lamp Shades • Lamp Repairs 

Hrs.: Showroom Mon-Sat 9-6Thurs9-8 
Supply Counter Mon-Fri 7-6 Sat 8-5 

767-5000 

476 South Fraiiklin St., Rt. 37, Holbrook 




People Advance By Degrees 

At Quincy College you can begin your degree 
program this spring at either our Quincy or Ply- 
mouth campuses. We offer complete degree 
programs at both campuses. And unlike other 
schools we haven't increased tuition for four years. 
Take your next step forward now at Quincy College. 

• Earn an Associate's Degree or Certificate 

• Full and Part-time Programs offered Days, 
Evenings and Saturdays 

• 28 Majors and Concentrations to choose from 

• Financial Aid and Child Care available 

• Campuses conveniently located in Quincy 
and Plymouth 

Classes Begin January 26, 1993 

For more information call 

(508) 747-5523 Plymouth Campus 

(617) 984-1700 Quincy Campus 




Quincy 
College 



V 



34 Coddington Street, Quincy, MA 02169 
1 1 North Street, Plymouth, MA 02360 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 7, 1993 



Sheets Declares City 
'Economically Sound' 
In Mid-Term Address 



Cont'd From Page 1 

presentation to the City 
Council, I do so with 
optimism and with hope," 
Sheets said. 

He credited the Council 
with working together with 
his administration to find 
creative ways of cutting 
costs. 

Sheets also trumpeted 
the city's most recent 
reorganization project - of 
the city employee health 
insurance program - which 
he said will save the city 
$1.5 million in each of the 
next two years. 

The health insurance 
program for retired 
municipal employees was 
also restructured resulting 
in a savings of $1 million 
this year. 

"Reorganization will 
continue to be the key to 
future budgetary success," 
Sheets said. 

"We should remember 
that these economic 
challenges are fleeting and 
temporary. The truly 
lasting issues are quality 
of life issues. And, in 
1992, we have made great 
progress," Sheets said. 

The mayor also pointed 
to other highlights of his 
administration: 

•The growth and 
success of Quincy 
Hospital. 

•The city's expanded 
recycling program. 

• Completed and 
ongoing sewer projects and 
flood control projects. 

He also discussed 
recent developments 



which could boost 
Quincy's tourism industry 
including federal funding 
for the Quincy branch of 
the National Park Service 
which will pay for: 

•Improvements to the 
Beale Estate on Adams 
Street. 

•A visitor's center at 
Presidents Place. 

•A trolley service 
between historic sites. 

Sheets also said the 
burial sites of John Adams 
and John Quincy Adams 
and their wives will be 
open on the same schedule 
as the president's 
birthplaces and the Adams 
Mansion. 

Also, Sheets expects 
Governor WiUiam Weld to 
sign legislation creating 
the United States Naval 
Shipbuilding Museum 
Corporation. 

The museum will 
negotiate a lease with the 
MWRA for a 5.5 acre site 
at the Fore River Shipyard 
where the U.S.S. Salem is 
expected to arrive in the 
spring. 

Private funding will pay 
for enhancement of 
Constitution Common and 
Mclntyre Mall near City 
Hall. The project includes 
the "Walk of Names" brick 
program and a new 
fountain as centerpiece. 

Sheets said that recent 
physical improvements to 
downtown Quincy set the 
stage for expanding the 
city's retail mix. Sheets 
said the key to revitalizing 
the downtown area will be 



the development of 
110,000 sq.ft. of new retail 
space at the Hancock 
Parking area. 

"It is pure folly to 
believe that we can attract 
modern retailers to a 
vacant site, like the old 
Child World location, or 
into a downtown that looks 
shabby," Sheets said. "We 
must create new retail 
space which meets the 
requirements of today's 
retailers." 

Sheets said the city will 
work with its business and 
labor partners in the 
Quincy 2000 program to 
develop the site. 

"The Hancock retail 
project will be the first 
major project to feel the 
powerful impact of this 
new partnership. I am 
absolutely confident of its 
success," Sheets said. 

Sheets said 1992 was a 
positive year for Quincy's 
educational system. 
Highlights included: 

•Hiring of Eugene 
Creedon as Superintendent 
of Schools. 

•Full accreditation of 
North Quincy High School. 

•Plans for an addition to 
the Bemazzani School. 

•Construction of an 
early childhood center. 

•The growth of Quincy 
College. 

In his conclusion. 
Sheets said that the city 
was able to endure deep 
cuts in local aid between 
1990 and 1993 "through 
our creativity, our hard 
work, and our willingness 
to woifc together." 




JEANNE REARDON is sworn in as City CouncU Clerk of Committees by City Clerk Joe 
Shea. Reardon is beginning her 13th year in the position. 



QCBPA 'After 5' 
Networking Social Jan 



.27 



The Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association will hold an 
"After 5" Networking 
Social, Wednesday, Jan. 
27 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at 
River Bay Club, 99 



Brackett St. 

The socials allow 
QCBPA members to 
familiarize themselves 
with the sponsoring 
business and meet other 
members and guests. 



^^ vsAvims 



Take 
Stock 
in 



Cost is $5 at the door. 
Hors d'oeuvres and other 
refreshments will be 
served. RSVP by calling 
471-3232. 

Other social are 
scheduled for March 3 at 
Fine Light Photography; 
March 31 at Brennan's of 
Quincy Square; April 21 at 
A.E. Goodhue; May 12 at 
New England Deli; and 
June 15 at Designer Hair 
Company. 




THE CITY COUNCIL CHAMBER was full as Mayor James Sheets delivered his mid- 
term address Monday. Among those in attendance were, first row, from left, School 
Committee members Margaret King and Linda Stice, and former State Sen. Paul 
Harold. Second row, from left, William Reardon, Jr., and William Reardon, Sr., son 
and husband of Clerk of Committees Jeanne Reardon. Third row, from left, Brian 
Buckley, Council on Aging Director, and Ray Cattaneo, Park, Recreation and Cemetery 
Executive Director. 

Cahill: 'We're Not Out 
Of The Woods Yet' 



Contd From Page 1 

the weather cooperates 
and we have little or no 
snow and ice. On the other 
hand you never know. We 
could have an unusually 
cold winter with a higher 
than normal number of 
water main breaks." 

Cahill said there was 
one glaring omission from 
the mayor's address. 

"One thing that wasn't 
mentioned was the 
MWRA and water-sewer 
rates and what the city 
will do to address the 
issue," Cahill said. 

While Cahill warned 
about being overly 
optimistic, other 
councillors gave Sheets 
good overall marks for his 
performance. 

"I think the mayor is 
heading the city in the 
right direction despite the 
bleak economy," said 
Ward 6 Councillor Bruce 
Ayers. "He is working on 
good schools, safe streets 
and hope for a bright 
healthy future. Quincy 
2000 and other plans he 
has initiated are certainly 
leading us in that 
direction." 

"The mayor has done a 
great job as has the City 
Council. The main thing is 
that we move ahead. We 
all want the same thing... 
to make Quincy a better 
place to live," said Ward 1 
Councillor Peter Kolson. 

"It's amazing what we 
have accomplished over 
the last two or three years, 



particularly last year," 
Kolson said. "There is a lot 
of optimism, a lot of hope, 
there is a great future in 
Quincy. What people 
receive for their tax dollar 
is enormous for the futu*-.; 
that's ahead of us. We 
have all sorts of things 
going on and the services 
are still there." 

"I think the mayor's 
address was upbeat," 
Phelan said. "I was happy 
with the comments he 
made about public safety 
and bringing it up to 
strength. I think the people 
need to feel safe in the 
city." 

"He (Sheets) touched 
on a lot of important issues 
that both the mayor's 
office and the City 
Council have addressed 
over the past few years," 
said Ward 4 Councillor 
Thomas Fabrizio. "I 
thought his speech was on 
target. It reflected his 
experience as a city 
councillor, as mayor, and 
as an educator. The theme 
of both the mayor's and 
Councillor (Council 
President Charles) 
Phelan's remarks was that 
we're all working towards 
a better community and I 
think we'll continue to 
strive towards that." 

Several of the 
councillors agreed that the 
Quincy 2000 plan could 
have a big impact on the 
city. 

"I think (Quincy 2000) 
is going to work out and 



really take off this year, " 
Phelan said. 

"I'm pleased with the 
direction the mayor 
intends to move on a 
couple of different issues," 
said Ward 3 Councillor 
Larry Chretien. "With 
Quincy 2000, I think we'll 
see the fruits of that effort 
as early as this year." 

Chretien was also 
happy that the mayor has 
made consolidation of city 
government a priority. 
Chretien introduced ideas 
on streamlining various 
city departments more 
than a year ago. 

"The mayor has worked 
hard in his position on the 
School Committee. There 
are a couple of building 
projects and other things to 
see to it that everyone in 
Quincy gets the education 
they deserve," Chretien 
added. 

"Quincy is moving 
forward. The mayor's 
address offers us positive 
hope of improving 
economic conditions in the 
city and the business 
climate which will serve 
to lower taxes for 
residents," said Councillor- 
at-Large Michael Cheney. 
"The mayor and City 
Council have worked 
together to improve the 
quality of life and to 
ensure that services are 
deUvered at the cheapest 
possible cost." 

By STEVE KAVANAGH 



Johnson Withdraws As 

Presidential Candidate 

At Eastfield College 



(Cont'd from Page 3) 

California and a 12 and 
15-year-old who live with 
him in Hanover. 

Since taking the reins 
at Quincy College, 
Johnson said he has been 
offered four college 
president positions. But 
before he considers 



another offer to move on, 
Johnson said the chain of 
command issue must be 
resolved. 

"I want to see the 
governance resolved and 
see Quincy College as a 
totally stable institution: 
in its finances, its 



governance, policy setting 
process and enrollment. 

"I want to continue 
working for the people of 
Quincy and this region and 
I want to make Quincy 
College the best in the 
worid." 



Thnralar, Janiur; 7, 1993 Qnincy Sua Page 11 



Re-Elected Council President 

Phelan Praises Colleagues 
Sets Council Priorities 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

City Council President 
Charles Phelan, Jr., 
congratulated his 
colleagues Monday for 
leading the city through 
tough economic times. 
Phelan's remarks followed 
his re-election as council 
president. 

"When I came on the 
City Council five years 
ago in 1988, we were 
looking at an expanding 
economy and expanding 
state aid. In the years to 
follow, we faced the loss 
of state aid and one of the 
largest downturns in the 
economy in several years," 
Phelan said. "Many cities 
the size of Quincy faced 
severe cutbacks in 
services. Some even going 
bankrupt. In the same 
period of time, Quincy has 
maintained its financial 
stability and was still able 
to deliver vital services to 
its citizens." 

Phelan pointed to some 
of the successes of his 
fellow councillors in the 
past year. 

Peter Kelson, Ward 1 
- leadership in fighting 
rising MWRA water and 
sewer rates; work to help 
residents recover from 
storm damage. 

Ted DeCristofaro, 
Ward 2 - chairman of the 
Health & Hospital 
Committee which oversaw 
computerization at Quincy 
Hospital; guidance in 
helping Phelan as council 
president. 

Larry Chretien, Ward 
3 • success and expansion 
of Quincy's recycling 
program. 

Tom Fabrizio, Ward 4 




COUNCIL PRESIDENT Charles Phelan, Jr., tells his 
colleagues that Quincy has a bright future. "The 
financial stability of the city helped us to go through very 
difficult times," Phelan said during remarks at Monday's 
council meeting. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



- leadership in negotiating 
the Home Depot project. 

Bruce Ayers, Ward 6 

- handling of the Tall 
Ships controversy during 
his first year in office. 

Mike Cheney, At- 
Large - leadership in 
organizing the first "First 
Night" celebration. 

Tim CahiU, At-Large - 
introduced a resolve to 
change the governance at 
Quincy College; fiscal 
conservative with taxpayer 
money. 

Pat Toland, At-Large - 
leadership as Finance 
Committee chairman; 



Quincy's representative on 
the Massachusetts 
Municipal Association 
board. 

Phelan said the 
council's priorities in the 
coming years should be to 
work on: 

•The Old Colony 
Railroad project. 

•Alleviating school 
overcrowding through the 
Bernazzani School 
addition and construction 
of the Lincoln School 
Early Childhood Center. 

•Change the gover- 
nance structure of Quincy 
College. 



City Council Meeting Monday, Jan. 11 



The Quincy City 
Council will reconvene 
Monday, Jan. 11 at 7:30 
p.m. at City Hall. 

The Council will 
conduct its regular 
business at this meeting. 
The next regularly 

scheduled Council 
meeting will be held 



SECONDARY 
LUNCH 



Jan. 11-15 
Men: pizza, green 
beans, apple crisp, milk. 

Tues* Early release 
day, middle and high 
school. Hamburger on a 
roll, cole slaw or salad, 
fiaiit juice, jello, milk. 

Wed: stuffed shells 
with sauce, vegetable, 
fresh baked Italian roll, 
fiuit juice, milk. 

Thurs: Kentucky 
style chicken, mashed 
potato, peas, fresh baked 
wheat roll, jello, milk. 

Fri: grilled cheese 
sandwich, later tots, fruit 
juice, milk. 



Tuesday, Jan. 19 at 7:30 pm. 



ELEMENTARY 
LUNCH 



Jan. 11-15 
Mon: pizza, fruit 

juice, chocolage chip 

cookies, milk. 

Tues: Early Release 

Day. No lunch served. 
Wed: tuna salad on a 

roll, chopped lettuce with 



dressing, fruit juice, milk. 

Thurs: turkey 
fricassee, sweet potato, 
peas, fresh baked wheat 
roll, milk. 

Fri: grilled cheese 
sandwich, tater tots, fiuit 
juice, milk. 



»Walk Of Names' 
Bricks At Half- Way Goal 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

Bricks for the city's 
"Walk of Names" project 
continued to sell 
extremely well throughout 
the Christmas season, 
according to a 
spokesperson for the 
company marketing the 
endeavor. 

Georgia Peirce of P.R. 
Etc. said Tuesday that 
approximately 1,200 
bricks, nearly half the 
company's ultimate goal 
of 2,500, had been sold as 
of Dec. 31. 

"We were extremely 
busy the week before 
Christmas," said Peirce. 
"We received a number of 
interesting orders from 
people from out-of-state 
who were visiting for the 



holidays." 

Peirce added that a 
special walk-up ordering 
booth, which helped boost 
sales, was in place in the 
City Hall annex during 
that same week. 

City officials, who 
introduced plans for "Walk 
Of Names" Nov. 30, are 
relying on the sales of the 
2,500 bricks to assure the 
funding necessary to start 
the brick plaza project 
next summer. Aside from 
preparing the site, no 
municipal money will be 
used for the project, which 
calls for a new brick plaza 
in the area of in front of 
the City Hall annex. 

The dark red bricks, 
which will replace the 
present granite pavers, will 



be engraved with names 
from people of the past, 
present and future to form 
a "Walk of Names." 

For a donation of $50, 
any Quincy resident, 
business or group can have 
a personalized brick with 
up to 15 characters each. 
Officials hope to begin 
construction on the project 
this summer and to have it 
completed in fall. 

"Everybody has been 
extremely enthusiastic 
about the project," said 
Peirce. "We encourage 
people to get their orders 
in as soon as possible." 

Order forms for the 
bricks can be obtained in 
the City Hall annex lobby. 
Bricks can also be ordered 
directly by calling 376- 
3676. 



58 Residents On DOR 
Unclaimed Refund List 



Approximately 58 
Quincy taxpayers appear 
on the Massachusetts 
Department of Revenue 
(DOR) unclaimed refund 
list for 1991. 

In all, 3,548 state 
taxpayers are due refunds 
ranging from $1.00 to 
$5,901. Before turning the 
money over to the state 
treasurer for the general 
fund, the DOR is making 
one last effort to locate 
taxpayers who are owed 
money fit>m the state. 

Quincy names, as they 
appear on the list, are: 

Anderson, Est Will F., 159 
Whitwell St.; Manm, Or L. 
Paul. 159 Whitwell St.; 
Siddiqui. Mobin Uddi, 995 S. 
Artery A2; Mason, Est Robert 
P., 135 Quincy Ave.; Mason 
Ex or Robert J., 135 Quincy 
Ave.; Moschella, Toni, M., 
P.O. Box 2265; Low, Kwok, 
183 Taylor St.; Low, Lri, 183 
Taylor St.; Harrison, Sarah C, 
11 Sea St.; Morris, Daniel E., 
33 Bayview St.; Broderick, 
Helen L., 149 Common St.; 
Ryan Jr., Lawrence W., 14 
Russell St. A12; Homsy, 
John, 148 Malboro St.; 
Fantasia, Michael S., 144 
Washington St.; Fantasia, 
Theresa, 144 Washington St.; 
Martins, Benedito, 154 Elm 
St. A4; Clements, Carolann, 
104 Davis St.; Rivera, 
Waleska, 28 E. Squantum St.; 
Siddiqi, Mobin, 995 So. 
Artery A202; Siddiqi, Nelofur, 



^g^ Adult & Continuing 
"""^^ Education 



^^ 



CENTER FOR TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

(formerly Quincy Voc-Tech) 

107 Woodward Avenue 

Quincy, MA 02169 

Located across from YMCA 

Registration at Center for Technical Education: 

January 11-14, 1993 6:30-9:00 p.m. 
January 19-21, 1993 6:30-9:00 p.m. 
All classes will be held on Monday and Wednesday Evenings 
For additional information, calL John McLaughlin 984-8888 
Courses offered: QT-T), SJ^T, Computers, 'Business, Trade dr 1/oc. Reparation 
Tjnricfaneni "Programs and the ArU. 



995 So. Artery A202; Ehwyer, 
Peter L., 36 Saville Ave.; 
Albano, Leslie, 230 Granite 
St.; Jones, William F., 12 
Figurehead Ln.; Sirivath, 
Bounhome, Box 287; Sharpe, 
Gregory, 3 Shaw St.; Sharpe, 
Karen, 3 Shaw St. 

Spono, Jeff M., 46 
Cleverly Ct.; Sharpe, 
Gregory, 3 Shaw St.; Sharpe, 
Karen, 3 Shaw St.; Cheng, In 
Ngo, 24 Harriet St.; Drew, 
Jeffrey T., 35 Brooks Ave. A8; 
Sharpe, Gregory, 3 Shaw St.; 
Sharpe, Karen, 3 Shaw St.; 
Bousquet, Janice, 10 
Presidents Ln.; Ormeno, 
Victor M., 362 Centre St. #4; 
Cooperband, Adele R., 125 
Granite St.; Sharpe, Gregory, 
3 Shaw St.; Sharpe, Karen, 3 
Shaw St.; Bush, Joseph E., 51 
Plover Rd.; Gagei, Kim, 150 
Simmer St.; Gambino Jr., 
James V., 995 S. Artery, 
A508; Ferguson, Meghan K., 
120 Church St.; OShea, 
Jeremiah E., 41 South St.; 
OShea, Geraldine M., 41 
South St. 

Hamilton, Amanda E., 69 
Church St.; Siddiqui, Mobin 
Uddi, 995 S. Artery A202; 
Reppucci, Arnold, 175 Centre 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



Agnitti 

INSURANCE 

HOME •AUTO 'BUSINESS 




Anthony L. Agnitti 

CALL FOR A QUOTE ON 

PROPER mSURANCE 

COVERAGE AT 
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21 FRANKLIN ST., QUINCY 



St.; Sharpe, Gerregory, 3 
Shaw St.; Sharpe, Karen, 3 
Shaw St.; Freitas, Zequias, 50 
Ross Way; Peterson, Chad 
C, 1 Bessie St. A4; Camargo, 
Donisete G., 291 Newport 
Ave. A45; Delval, Est Enriqu 
A., 75 Palmer St. A620; 
Taylor, James S., 1000 S. 
Artery A 103; OMalley, Paul 
R. 252 S. Central Ave.; 
OMalley, Paula, 252 S. 
Central Ave.; Crispo, Jeffrey, 
100 Macy St.; Crispo, Nicole. 
100 Macy St.; and Rogers, 
Emest E., 310 Copeland St. 
A53. 

Taxpayers on the list 
are urged to contact the 
nearest DOR office 
immediately. The toll free 
number in Boston is (800) 
392-6089 or 727-4545. 

Any unclaimed 
remaining checks will be 
sent to the state treasurer's 
office in June, 1993. 



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Mon thru W«d, Fri & Sat until 6 pm 
Thurt. unll9pin. 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 7, 1993 



Obituaries 



Alice J. Delaney 

Retired Administative Assistant 

A funeral Mass for rezoned. The 



Richard A. Cooke Sr., 75 

Retired Quincy Firefighter 



Alice J. (Kelly) Delaney 
of Wollaston was 
Celebrated Monday in Our 
Lady of Good Counsel 
Church. 

Mrs. Delaney died Dec. 
30 at Milton Hospital after 
a brief illness. 

An administrative 
assistant with Paine- 
Webber in Boston for 45 
years, she retired in 1989. 
She also did some work as 
a broker along with her 
administrative duties. 

An ardent sailor, she 
and her sister, Dorothy C. 
Kelly of Wollaston, were 
known as the Kelly Sisters 
sailing team. During their 
many years of racing, the 
Kelly Sisters won a 
number of races including 
the Quincy Bay Race 
Week competition. 

A member of the 
Wollaston Park 

Association, she worked 
with that group to have the 
Wollaston Beach area 



group 

succeeded in having it 
classified as residential to 
prevent it from becoming 
comiiurcialized. 

The association also 
fought a proposed high-rise 
project for the Black's 
Creek Marsh. With the 
high-rise blocked, the 
owners donated the land to 
the city for a park. 

She was a charter 
member of the Quincy 
Citizens Association. 

Bom in Chicago, she 
lived in Quincy since she 
was 2 years old. She was a 
graduate of North Quincy 
High School and Burdett 
College. 

She taught herself to 
play the concertina and 
was also a cat fancier. 

She was the wife of the 
late Leonard C. Delaney. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St. 



A funeral Mass for 
Richard A. Cooke Sr., 75, 
of North Quincy, a retired 
Quincy firefighter, was 
celebrated Tuesday in 
Sacred Heart Church. 

Mr. Cooke died Dec. 30 
in North Conway, N.H. 

He retired from the 
Quincy Fire Department in 
1957 after 15 years of 
service. 

He was a charter 
member of Local 792 of 
the International 

Association of Firefighters 
and a founder of Quincy 
Municipal Credit Union. 
He was bora in Boston. 
He was a member of 
North Quincy High 
School's first graduating 
class, in 1934, and was the 



first person inducted into 
the school's Basketball A funeral service for 
Hall of Fame. Dorothy (Wilson) Schultz, 

Husband of the late ^1, of Quincy, was held 
Dorothy (McGaw) Cooke, J^" 3 in Temple Beth El. 
he is survived by a son. Mrs. Schultz died Dec. 
Richard A. Cooke Jr. of 31 at Brigham and 
Hanover, a member of the Women's Hospital in 
Quincy Fire Department; a Bo.ston. 
daughter, Dianne Medley After her husband died 
of North Conway, N.H.; •" 1953, she took over the 
two brothers, Peter J. management of the 
Cooke of Sandwich and Dorothy Ann Shop retail 
Bradenton, Fla. and Dr. apparel shops in 
Edward F. Cooke of Weymouth Landing, 
Naples, Fla.; and four Wliitman and Middleboro. 
grandchildren. I" 1961, she changed the 

Burial was in Mt. name of the Whitman 
Wollaston Cemetery. store to the Nanci Jane 

Funeral arrangements Shop. She retired in 1982. 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



Dorothy Schultz, 81 

Owned Apparel Shops 



in Boston, she 
in Quincy since 



Gertrude M. Fitzgerald, 87 

Worked For Quincy Public Works Dept. 



Eva A. Michneawicz, 83 



A funeral Mass for Eva 
A. (Kebert) Michneawicz, 
83, of Quincy, formerly of 
South Boston, was 
celebrated Jan. 2 in St. 
John's Church. 

Mis. Michneawicz died 
Dec. 30 at the Ellis 
Nursing Center where she 
had been a resident the 
past four months. 

She was bom in South 
Boston. 

Wife of the late Stanley 
Michneawicz, she is 
survived by a son, Stanley 
Michneawicz of South 



R.E. PAPILE CO. 

1546 Hancock St., Quincy 

Memonal Gifts, Perpetuate, 

Plaques, Engraving, Prayer Cards. 

Let us assist you on all your 

memonal needs. 

471-0222 



Boston; two daughters, 
Eva Karcber of Quincy and 
Rose Marie Stone of 
Phoenix; three sisters, 
Helen Wagner of 



A funeral Mass for 
Gertrude M. (Corcoran) 
Fitzgerald, 87, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Tuesday in 
Most Blessed Sacrament 
Church. 

Mrs. Fitzgerald died 
Jan. 2 at Quincy Hospital 
aiiter a brief illness. 

She was a former 
employee of the Quincy 
Public Works Department, 
where she worked for 10 



Police Department, she is 
survived by a son, William 
D. Fitzgerald of 
Weymouth; two sisters, 
Irene M. Corcoran of 
Quincy and Virginia Garity 
of Braintree; five 
grandchildren, and seven 
great-grandchildren. She 



Bom 
lived 
1938. 

She was a life member 
of Hadassah and a 
founding member of 
Temple Beth El of Quincy. 

Wife of the late Meyer 



Schultz, she is survived by 
a son, Alan L. Schultz of 
Quincy; three daughters, 
Barbara Fleischer of Palm 
Beach Gardens, Fla. and 
Weston, Nancy Gamache 
of Calabasas, Calif., and 
Leslie J. Schultz of 
Sherman Oaks, Calif.; two 
brothers, David Wilson of 
Newton and Jacob Wilson 
of Milton; a sister, 
Rebecca Sholler of 
Minneapolis, Minn.; six 
grandchildren, and two 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Sharon 
Memorial Park, Sharon. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Stanetsky 
Memorial Chapels, 
Brookline. 

Donations may be made 
to the Brigham and 
Women's Hospital 
Development Office, 16 
Huntington Ave., Boston, 
MA 02130. 



Bertha B. Keith, 84 



Billerica, Sophie Graf of years. 



Former Laundry Manager 

A funeral service for resident of Quincy. 
Bertha B. (Beaudette) She is survived by a 
Keith, 84, of Quincy, was son, Robert A. Duffy of 

^ held Tuesday in the Quincy; five 

was the mother of the late Sweeney Funeral Home, grandchildren, and eight 
Daniel J. Fitzgerald Jr. and ^^^ Copeland St. great-grandchildren. She 

Mrs. Keith died Jan. 3 was the mother of the late 
at Qumcy Hospital after a Murray B. Keith and 



North Easton and Marta 
Yantas of Sun City, Ariz.; 
six grandchildren and 
several great- 

grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Benedict Cemetery, West 
Roxbury. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Hamel, 
Wickens and Troupe 
Funeral Home, 26 Adams 
St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Dana-Farber Cancer 
Institute, 44 Binney St., 
Boston, MA 02115. 



She was a graduate of 
the Vesper George Art 
School in Boston. 

Bom and educated in 
Quincy, she was a lifelong 
resident. 

Wife of the late Daniel 
J. Fitzgerald of the Quincy 



Joan Marie Fitzgerald 
Burial was in Hall 

Place Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 

were by the Sweeney 

Brothers Home for 

Funerals, 1 Independence 

Ave. 

Donations may be made 

to the charity of one's 

choice. 



brief illness. 

She was a former 
manager for Twin City 
Laundry in Quincy, where 
she worked for 40 years. 

Born in Bridgewater, 
Vt., and was a lifelong 



Richard W. Keith. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Donations may be made 
to the charity of one's 
choice. 



Franziska E. Jackson, 73 



Mary T. DiBona, 78 




A THOUGHT 
FOR THE WEEK 

Someone once eatd: 

"Faith Is not a substKute for 

thought, but the basis for 

thinking." Faith is taking our 

doubts Into consideration and 

rendering a verdict in favor of 
SCOTT DEWARE 5,,,^^ " 

Because one has faith does not mean he cannot 
question or doubt. The person who lias some doubts 
rolling around In his mind will l>e learning, experienc- 
ing and discovering new and t>etter things. Doubts 
can cause one to come upon exciting beliefs and 
truths. 

Fatth or t>eiief Is an Instrument of vast power ready 
for us to use. H Is true that we can have almost 
anything we l>elieve we can have. Something seems 
to itappen to a man when he gets the Idea of 
achievement Into his mind and holds It there. Suc- 
cessful iNJslnessmen are usually those who over tlie 
years have firmly l>elieved in their ultimate success. 
Inventors are men who press toward a goal, confident 
tliat they can achieve It. Columbus had faith that there 
was a new world beyond the western horizon. By his 
l>elief he laid hold on that new world .. 

"All things are possible to them that believe" ... 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the "New England Funeral Trust' 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered to Any Distance 



A funeral Mass for 
Franziska E. (Koch) 
Jackson, 73, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Tuesday in 
St. Arm's Church. 

Mrs. Jackson died Dec. 
3 1 at Quincy Hospital. 

A member of the Koch 
Club Bowling League, she 
was the sister of the late 
Dick Koch, founder of the 
Quincy club. 

Bora in Boston, she 
lived in Quincy for 60 
years. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Ralph E. Jackson 
Jr.; four sons, Ralph E. 
Jackson ni and Richard P. 
Jackson, both of Quincy, 
and Ronald F. Jackson and 
Roger D. Jackson, both of 
Rorida; three daughters, 



Franziska M. Mantia and 
Paula M. Jackson, both of 
of Quincy, and Dorma M. 
Davis of Rhode Island; two 
brothers, Karl Koch and 
Paul Koch, both of 
Quincy; two sisters, Mary 
Phelan of Quincy and Ann 
Byras of California; and 
five grandchildren. She 
was also the sister of the 
late Leo Koch. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Koch Club, c/o 
Thomas Koch, Mayor's 
Office, Quincy City Hall, 
Quincy, MA 02169. 



A funeral Mass for 
Mary T. (Salvucci) 
DiBona, 78, of Quincy, 
was celebrated yesterday 
(Wednesday) in St. John's 
Church. 

Mrs. DiBona died Jan. 2 
at Quincy Hospital. 

Born in Claremont, 
N.H., she lived in Quincy 
since 1935. 

Wife of the late Angelo 
DiBona, she is survived by 
two sons, Francis A. 
DiBona of South 
Weymouth and Robert L. 
DiBona of Plymouth; a 
daughter, Marilyn C. 
DiBona of Milton; four 



two 



Mt. 



grandchildren, and 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Bolea- 
Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 
116 Franklin St. 

Donations may be made 
to the South Shore 
Association for Retarded 
Cirizens, Inc., 371 River 
St., North Weymouth, MA 
02191; or Hospice of 
Quincy Visiting Nurse 
Association, 1354 
Hancock St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 



Theresa Sava, 79 



A funeral Mass for 
Theresa (Penella) Sava, 
79, of Quincy, was 
celebrated yesterday 



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(Wednesday) at Sacred 

Heart Church. 

Mrs. Sava died Jan. 2 at 

Quincy Hospital after a 

brief illness. 

Bom in Boston, she 

lived in Quincy for 34 

years. 

She is survived by her 

husband, Lawrence Sava; 

two daughters, Lorraine 

Sava of Quincy and Ann 

M. Sava of North 

Weymouth; two brothers, 
Leonard Penella of 
Dorchester and Anthony 
Permella of Quincy; and a 
granddaughter. 

Burial was in 
Knollwood Memorial Park, 
Canton. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



Thursday, January 7, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 13 



Business 



De Wolfe Offering 
Buyer Agency 



De Wolfe New England 
is now offering Buyer 
Agency to those who seek 
home- finding assistance. 

Richard B. De Wolfe, in 
making the announcement, 

said: 

"This will be an 
additional contractual 
segment that will augment 
our traditional service 
which will continue to be 
available to those who 
prefer that approach. 

"In addition, DeWolfe 
will offer complete 
cooperation to 'Realtor' 
Buyer Agents who wish to 
show and sell our listings. 
Our sellers will enjoy 
additional opportunities to 
expose their properties to 
buyers who are using 
Buyer Agents in greater 
numbers. 

"In order to assure 
complete education and 
understanding of our new 
service and the contracts 
and disclosures which 
have been developed, we 
have adopted a policy 
which will require every 
DeWolfe associate, 
manager, relocation and 
mortgage personnel to 
attend training and obtain 
certification." 

DeWolfe noted that for 
nearly five decades the 
process of buying and 



selling homes has 
remained virtually 
unchanged--the 
introduction of Multiple 
Listing Service being the 
only notable exception. 

"The laws of agency 
and the concept of sub- 
agency have governed 
practices during this entire 
period seemingly without 
deceit or discord, yet 
definitely creating 
misunderstanding and 
some disappointment," he 
said. 

"Consumers, 
corporations, regulators 
and lawmakers have taken 
special note of our industry 
practices and have pushed 
for both disclosure and a 
higher level of 
accountability in our 
conduct with customers 
and clients. 

"The DeWolfe 

reputation has been built 
on adherence to the 
principles and values of 
honesty, integrity and 
fairness but today we need 
to offer even more. We are 
an industry leader and as 
such must respond to the 
needs of our public. It's 
time to change and change 
we will." 

DeWolfe New England 
has a Quincy office at 835 
Hancock St. 



Dr. Gary Hirshberg Named 

Chief Anesthesiologist 

At St. Louis Children's Hospital 



Quincy native Gary 
Hirshberg, M.D., was 
recently appointed 
anesthesiologist-in-chief at 
St. Louis Children's 
Hospital and director of 
the division of pediatric 
anesthesiology at 
Washington University 
Medical School. 

"The past few years 
have seen significant 
growth in our surgical 
programs. Since 1986, the 
number of operating room 
cases has increased 71 
percent and the number of 
OR hours has increased 97 



percent," said Alan Brass, 
president and chief 
executive officer at the 
hospital. 

"Dr. Hirshberg possesses 
the attributes, both 
clinically and 

administratively, to build a 
top quality department to 
support surgical 

expansion." 

Hirshberg is a graduate 
of Hahnemann Medical 
College in Philadelphia. 
He is the son of Dr. 
Sumner Hirshberg of 
Quincy and the late Molly 
Hirshberg. 



Maribeth Castonia Named 
Assistant Quality Control Manager 

Maribeth Castonia has quality control at Industrial 

been appointed an since 1989. She was 

assistant quality control previously employed by 

manager by the Board of Ciba Coming in Walpole. 
Directors at Industrial Heat 



Crime 
Watch 



By ROBERT HANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quincy Police Department 




No All-Night Parking 
Without Permit 

City Ordinance Article IV Sec. 67. All-Night Parking 
Prohibited. 

"It shall be unlawful for the driver of any vehicle, 
other than one acting in an emergency, to park such 
vehicle on any street for a period of time longer than 
two hours between the hours of 1:00 am and 7:00 am of 
any day. 

The above shall not apply to any vehicle bearing an 
all-night parking permit which has been issued by the 
Quincy Police Department. Said permits shall be valid 
for one year from date of issue, and shall cost $2.00. 
Said permit may be revoked for cause at anytime." 

All-Night Parking Permit Agreement 
1: The parking decal permits the owner of this vehicle 
to park in a designated area between the hours of 1:00 
am and 7:00 am. 

2: All other City ordinances with regard to parking 
regulations must be observed. 

3: In the event of a snow emergency the parking permit 
is suspended and the vehicle must be removed from the 
street until plowing operations are completed. If the 
vehicle is not removed it will be subject to tow action. 
4: If the owner of this car moves to a different address 
he will notify the Quincy Police Department 
immediately. 

5: Violations of the above regulations will result in the 
revocation of this permit. 

Winter Parking Schedule 

Between October 15th and April 15th you must park 
your vehicle on the even numbered side of the street in 
an even numbered year ... and, park on the odd 
numbered side of the street in an odd numbered year. 

Applications for all-night parking permits may be 
obtained at the Quincy Police Station. Once the 
application is filled out, the request is checked by the 
Traffic Bureau. An Officer will be sent to the address to 
check the need for a parking permit. 

If in his/her estimation there is enough room in the 
driveway for the vehicle, the parking permit will be 
denied. Parking permits are not issued so that people 
do not have to jockey vehicles around in their 
driveways. 

It may take up to two weeks before a parking 
permit request is granted, this gives the department 
time to check the address on several occasions to 
make sure there is a real need. Parking permits cost 
$2.00, one all-night parking ticket costs $5.00, it's a 
matter of simple economics, a parking permit is 
cheaper. 

David Ziolkowsky 
SMU Scholar 



Police Log 
Hot Spots 



Monday, Dec. 28: 
Break, 10:09 am: 76 Field St., Mass Electric Sub 
Station 

Tuesday, Dec. 29: 
Break, 9;18 am, 396 Sea St. Apartment broken into 
Break, 11:15 am, 284 Water St. Entrance gained 
through window. A Trek Antelope Mountain bike was 
stolen. 

WednesJay, Dec. 30: 
Break/Arrest, 2:23 am, 119 Burgin Parkway. Officer 
F. Barnes arrested a 24-year-old Randolph man for 
breaking and entering in the night and assault and 
battery with a dangerous weapon. 
Att. Break, 9:34 am, 12 Gannett Rd., Owner reports 
lock on garage door tampered with, no entrance gained. 
Break, 11:40 am, 215 Quincy Ave., Bradlees. 
Manager reports an outside storage container was 
broken into. 

Break, 7:11 pm, 208 Newbury Ave. Under 
investigation. 

Thursday, Dec. 31: 
Break, 12:18 am, 86 Quarry St. Rear door broken, 
nothing missing. 

Robbery, 1:36 am, Felton St. Cab driver reports being 
held up in this area by two white males in their late 
teens. Youths both wearing baseball caps and dark 
clothing. 

Break, 6:33 pm, 722 Willard St. Apartment broken 
into. 

Break, 7:58 pm, 28 Woodbine St. Under investigation 
Break/Arrest, 11:25 pm, 192 School St. Officer L. 
Coppens responded and arrested a 25 year old 
Randolph man for breaking and entering in the night. 

Friday, Jan. 1: 
Break/Arrest, 12:37 am, 87 Chuhbuck St. Officer J. 
Horrigan responded and arrested a 28 year old Quincy 
man for burglary. 
Break, 10:22 am, 44 Mass Ave. Under investigation 

Saturday, Jan. 2: 
Break, 1:21 pm, 43 Mill St. Caller reports someone 
broke into his apartment and stole a large amount of 
money. 

Sunday, Jan. 3: 
Break, 1:21 am, 15 Beale St., World Electronics. 
Front window smashed in. 
Break, 8:30 pm, 65 West St. Under investigation. 

Services for Week: Total calls serviced -999; 
Total Arrests-45; Total Stolen Cars- 12. 

If you have any information on any of the above 
crimes, or any crime, please contact the Quincy Pohce 
Detective Bureau at 479-1212 ext. 312. You will not be 
required to identify yourself, but it could help. 

Correction 



Because of a 
typographical error, a story 
in last week's edition of 
The Quincy Sun incorrectly 
stated that an award for 
Dick Taylor at the recent 
Quincy High Baseball Hall 



of Fame induction dinner 
at the Sons of Italy Hall 
was accepted by Rick 
Cummings. 

In fact, the award was 
accepted by Chris 
Cummings. 



David Anthony 

Ziolkowski, 33 Brunswick 
St., Quincy, has been 
named a University 
Scholar at Southern 
Methodist University in 
Dallas. 

Selection is based on a 
variety of factors, 
including academic record 
and extracurricular 
activities in high school. 



Treating, Inc., of North 
Quincy. 

A 1987 honors graduate 
of Stonehill College, with 
a degree in chemistry, 
Castonia has worked in 



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Page 14 Qutocy Sun Thursday, January 7, 1993 

41 On Honor Roll 
At St. Joseph School 



Forty-one students are 
listed on the honor roll for 
the first trimester at St. 
Joseph's School. 
They are: 

Grade 2: Elizabeth 
Bloomer, Meghan 
Chagnon, Ronald DeVera, 
Thomas Reynolds, Lauren 
Servaes, Gary Jacobs. 

Grade 3: Garrett 
Berger, William Doran, 
Brendan Fludder, Joseph 
Jackson, Michael Kalell, 
Elizabeth Lo, Michael 
Lorenzano, Brianne 
Queeney, Stephen 
Ramponi, Juliette Vo. 

Grade 4: Caitlin Brillo, 
JoAnna Ford, Eugene Ho, 
Amanda Palmer, Morgan 
Peterson. 

Grade 5: Shaun Lynch. 
Grade 6: Katherine 
Connolly, Siobhan Farrell, 
Ann Marie Garcia, Kristen 
Giannandrea, Maeve 
Glynn, Sarah McQuinn, 
Ashley Peterson, Ryan 
Piccinin, Andrew 

Sweeney, Aurelio Vergara. 
Grade 7: Valerie 
Doherty, Bonnie Ford, 
Charlene Ho. 

Grade 8: Vera 
Junkovic, Erin Munn, 
Danielle Smith, Irene 
Eklund, Christine O'Neil, 
Joseph Barkhouse. 

The following students 



have achieved Honorable 
Mention: 

Grade 2: Saad Bhatti, 
Mary Zoe Bucavalas, 
Michael Capano, Kacy 
Cerasoli, Eric DiPietro, 
Nicole Glasheen, Nicole 
Martin, Robert Pearson. 

Grade 3: Laura Feeley, 
Kristopher Kambourian, 
David LaHage, Rachel 
Marshall, Kimberly 
Patrizi, Julie Piccinin. 

Grade 4: Samantha 
Buckley, Sean Crowley, 
Kerry Eaton, Karen Lo, 
John Lupo, Terri McAdam, 
Daniel McCaughin, 
Francis Ukpeh. 

Grade 5: Dianna Amo, 
Pamela Garrett, Courtney 
Madden, Devin 

McCaughin, Nicole 
McNamara, Michael 
Prezioso, Colleen Reid. 

Grade 6: Jonathan 
Brillo, Lisa Califano, 
Jamie Grossi, Katrina 
Skayne. 

Grade 7: Alicia 
Bertrand, Richard 
Carbonneau, Caryn Kalell, 
Erin Madden. 

Grade 8: Jason 
Chagnon, Nicole 
Giannandrea, Lisa Skayne, 
Anthony Califano, MeUssa 
DeBonis, Christine 
Pollara, Nancy Ruscio. 



Religion 



'For The Common Good' 
Bethany Sermon Topic 



Bishop Hart's 40th Year 
Of Ordination Party Feb. 12 



The Rev. Roger 
Ketcham, minister, will 
conduct the 10 a.m. 
worship service Sunday at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, Spear and 
Coddington Sts. 

Rev. Ketcham 's sermon 
topic will be "For The 
Common Good." Scripture 
reader will be James 
Ferriera. 

Two duets will be 
offered by Brenda Bonoli, 
soprano, Rosemary Way, 
alto, Paul Frazer, tenor 
and Matthew Murphy, 



bass. 

Carl Krause will be 
guest organist. Greeters 
will be Lois Greene and 
Irene King. The fellowship 
hour in the Allen Parlor 
following the worship 
service will be hosted by 
Gladys and Clayton 
Simpson and Paula Aluisy. 
Church School classes 
will be held at 10 a.m. and 
child care will be 
available for infants and 
toddlers. The Bible Study 
group will meet Sunday at 
8:30 a.m. in the parish 
house. 



The annual Hart Party 
for Bishop Daniel A. Hart, 
Auxiliary Bishop of Boston 
and Regional Bishop of 
the South Region will be 
held Friday, Feb. 12 at 
Lombardo's in Randolph. 

The Hart Party will be a 
celebrarion of Bishop 
Hart's 40th year of 
ordinarion. Bishop Hart 
was ordained a priest by 
the late Richard Cardinal 
Gushing on Feb. 2, 1953. 

Dinner is at 7 p.m. with 
dancing to follow. 

All proceeds will go to 
the benefit of CHRISM. 
CHRISM is a pastoral staff 



office for Bishop Hart. Its 
primary focus is to provide 
educational and spiritual 
enrichment programs to 
the laity, religious and 
clergy on the South Shore. 
Ministry training programs 
are available in the areas 
of liturgy, mission 
evangelization, and Rite 
of Christian Initiation of 
Adults (R.C.I.A.). 

Tickets are $28 per 
person and tables of 10 are 
available. For more 
information, call the 
CHRISM office at 331- 
5194 or Don Uvanitte, 
chairman, at 337-0451. 



Epiphany Sermon Topic 
At Covenant Congregational 



Scottish Heritage Week 
At Point Congregational 



3 Residents Invested 
In Boston Boy Choir 



The meaning and 
significance of Epiphany 
will be the sermon topic of 
the Rev. Gordon Schultz, 
interim pastor, at the 10:45 
a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Covenant 
Congregational Church, 
Whitwell and Granite Sts. 

Richard Smith, minister 
of music, will direct and 
accompany the choir in an 
introit and two anthems. 
He will also direct and 
organ prelude, offertory 



and postlude. 

Sunday School, with 
classes for all ages, will 
begin at 9:30 a.m. During 
the worship service, an 
attended nursery is 
available for children age 
five and younger. For 
children up to age 12, 
there is junior church. 

For more information 
about any of the church's 
activities, call the church 
office at 479-5728. 



The "Eighth Annual 
Scottish Heritage Week" 
will begin Sunday at 4 
p.m. at Quincy Point 
Congregational Church, 
Washington St. and 
Southern Artery, with "Tea 
and Scones" for $1 per 
person. 

Other events are: 

Saturday, Jan. 16 at 6 
p.m., "Annual Robbie 
Burns Banquet" with 
authentic Scottish roast 



beef dinner and 
entertainment for $10 per 
person (tickets should be 
purchased in advance). 

Sunday, Jan. 17 at 10 
a.m., "Kirking O' The 
Tartan" service of worship 
followed by an authentic 
Ceilidgh of Scottish 
delicacies and desserts. 

For more informarion, 
call the church office at 

773-6424. 



Dedication To God At 
First Church Of Squantum 



Three Quincy residents 
have been invested into 
the Boston Boy Choir 
which performs regularly 
at Tanglewood, Symphony 
Hall, and Carnegie Hall. 

They are: Robert 
Hanna, son of Mrs. and 
Mrs. Roberta Hanna of 



Sims Rd.; Allen Louie, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Kok-Hong 
Louie of East Squantum 
St.; and Andrew Nestor, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Nestor of Berry St. 

AU are fifth graders at 
the Boston Archdiocesan 
Choir School, Cambridge. 



'Making The Church Great' 
Topic At HN Congregational 



5 Residents Honored 
At Don Bosco Ceremony 



Five Quincy residents 
recently were honored at 
the Mass of the Holy Spirit 
at St. James Church in 
Boston for their scholastic 
achievements at Don 
Bosco Technical School. 

Michael J. Chase, 441 
Granite St., who attended 
St. Agatha's Grammar 
School in Milton, was 
named the outstanding 
student of the freshman 
class and received the 
departmental awards in 



9 



American Heart 
Association 



English I, Religion I, 
Mathematics, Social 
Studies and Intro to 
Computers. 

Other recipients and the 
grammar schools they 
attended are Thomas E. 
Piotrowski, 16 Dunmore 
St., St. Margaret's; and 
Brian J. Jeannette, 2 
Thompson St., St. 
Joseph's; both juniors. 
Also, Dennis M. Pateras, 
94 Walker St., Atlantic 
Middle School; and 
Michael G. Sullivan, 30 
Hobomack Rd., Sacred 
Heart; both sophomores. 

The awards are held 
annually to honor 
outstanding performance 
by students of the school. 



Rev. M. Alicia Corea 
will deliver the sermon, 
"Making the Church 
Great" at the 9 a.m. 
Sunday service at Houghs 
Neck Congregational 
Churdi. 

Ron Lemieux will be 
the greeter. Dorothy and 
Harold Sparks will serve 
for the Diaconate. 

Dr. Peter V. Corea s 
sermon at the 10:30 a.m. 
service will be "People 
Power." Martha Chase 
will be the scripture reader 

at both services. 

The choir will sing 

under the direction of 

Arden T. Schofield. 

Christine Pendergast will 

sing an offertory solo. 
There will be a 

sacrament of baptism 

during the 



service. Diaconate 

members Frank 

Catrambone and Ruth 
Gordon will serve. 

The greeter will be 
Barbara Curran. 

Coffee hour between 
the two services will be 
hosted by Miriam Coombs. 
Following the 10:30 
a.m. service, the 
Centennial Committee 
will meet. All those 
interesting in working on 
the 100th year celebration 
of the church should plan 
to attend the meeting. 

The church is equipped 
for the physically 
challenged. Donations are 
requested for the baskets 
in the vestibule for Fr. 
Bill's Place and the PSSB 
Pantry Shelf. 



Two children were 
presented by their parents 
in dedication to God last 
Sunday at First Church of 
Squantum, 164 Bellevue 
Rd. They were Christina 
Jennifer Duane and Juliana 
Kimberly Duane, 

daughters of John and 
Nancy Duane. 

Grandparents are Harry 
and Peggy Carleton and 
John and Dorothy Duane. 

The Rev. Dr. Gene 
Langevin, pastor, 
conducted the service 
assisted by Hazel Mayne, 
Patricia Langevin and 
Tom Klock. 



Scripture readers were 
Earl Taylor and Joan 
Hansen. 

The pastor spoke on 
"The Parents' Obligation" 
before leading the 
congregation in an 
observance of The Lord's 
Supper. Deacons who 
assisted were Ann and 
Tore Wallin, Hazel 
Mayne, Tom Klock and 
Louise Randall. 

This Sunday, the 
worship service will be 
held downstairs in 
fellowship hall at 10:30 
a.m. All are welcome. 



'Remember Your Baptism' 
United Methodist Topic 



10:30 a.m 

Seminarian To Preach 
At Quincy Point Church 



Church of 
Saint John 
the Baptist 

44 School St., Quincy, MA 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Saturday 4:00 & 7:00 pm 

Sunday: 7 am, 

9 am, 11 am, 

12:30 and 5:30 pm 

Confessions in Chapel Sat. 3-3:45 pm 

\ Rectoiy-21 Gay St. 773-1021 




Kevin Cameron, a third 
year seminarian at 
Andover Newton 

Theological School, 
Newton Centre, will 
deliver the morning 
sermon at the 10 a.m. 
worship service Sunday at 
Quincy Point 

Congregational Church, 
Washington St. and 
Southern Artery. 



Senior Deacon Susan 
Mahan will serve as 
Hturgist. Ginny Lindsay, 
chair of the Mission 
Board, will participate in 
"Time With The 

Children." Acolytes will 
be Jason McAuliffe and 
Leah Robertson, members 
of the 1993 Confirmation 
Class. 



The Rev. Harry Soper 
Jr. will preach on 
"Remember Your 
Baptism" at the 10 a.m. 
worship service Sunday at 
Quincy Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St. 

Scripture reader will be 
Leonard Perkinson. 
Greeters will be Russell 



and Mildred Peterson. 
Ushers will be William 
and Marion Cross. 

Sunday School will 
follow the Young Disciples 
message. The fellowship 
hour in Susannah Wesley 
Hall will be hosted by 
Virginia Hawes, Margaret 
Troup, Shirley Gargano 
and Esther Paulsen. 



Rev. James Kimmell To Preach 
Sunday At Faith Lutheran 



FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 

20 Greenleaf Street, Quincy 

Cordially invites you and 

your family to attend 

Sunday Services at 10:30 am. 

Sunday School is held 

at the same time. 

Wednesday Evening 

Meetings begin at 7:30 pm. 

Child Care is available both 

Sunday and Wednesday. 

Come and hear how Bible truths heal... 




Rev. James L. Kimmell, 
pastor, will preach at the 
10 a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Faith Lutheran 
Church, 201 Granite St. 
All are welcome. 

Coffee and fellowship 



will follow. Christian 
Education for adults and 
children begins at 9 a.m. 

For more information 
call the church office at 

472-1247. 



Blood Drive Saturday 
At Masonic Lodge 

The American Red 
Cross will conduct a 
Quincy community blood 



@ United ^^ 

^^^ II brings out the bfst in ill of us. 



drive Saturday, Jan. 9 from 
8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at 
Masonic Lodge, 1170 
Hancock St., Quincy 
Center. 



Call 471-8417 for an 
appointment to donate. 



Thursday, Janiury 7, 1993 Quiocy Sun Page 15 



Sun Sports 



Basketball 



Quincy Lands On 
Plymouth, 84-67 



The Quincy boys' 
basketball team turned in 
one of its best 
performances of the season 
Monday to defeat 
Plymouth, 84-67, and 
improve its record to 2-4 
(1-3 in the Old Colony 
League). 

The Presidents played 
at Falmouth last night 



(Wednesday), will host 
Barnstable Friday at 7 
o'clock and will be at 
Silver Lake next Tuesday 
night. 

In wiiming its second 
game in a row, Quincy 
was paced by junior 
forward Tom Malvesti, 
who scored 20 points and 
had eight rebounds. 



Eddie Kenney had 13 
points and four steals, 
Robbie Kane and Matt 
Dwyer 100 points apiece. 

"We are starting to put 
everything together," said 
Quincy coach John 
Franceschini. "We have 
cut down on our turnovers 
and our fouls and are 
shooting much better." 



Brockton Too Much 
For North Quincy 



The North Quincy boys' 
basketball team met up 
with former Suburban 
League rival Brockton 
Monday night and it 
wasn't a happy meeting as 
the Boxers handed the 
Raiders an 80-64 defeat. 
North fell to 4-3. 

The Raiders played 
Taunton last night 
(Wednesday), will play at 
Weymouth Friday and will 



be home to Bridgewater- 
Raynham next Tuesday 
night at 7 o'clock. 

Sean Donovan had a 
season-high 26 points and 
Luke Sheets pulled down 
12 rebounds, but the strong 
Boxers just had too much 
for the Raiders. 

In its previous game 
North Quincy pulled out a 
58- 54 win over Stoughton 
in the consolation game 



for the Stoughton Holiday 
Tournament. 

Sheets had 16 points, 
Donovan 10 and Bo Smith 
seven. 

North trailed, 28-22, at 
halftime but Sheets, 
Donovan and Smith led 
the Raiders from behind. 

The Raiders lost to 
Boston Latin, 84-70, in the 
opening round of the 
tournament. 



North Girls Defeat Quincy 



The North Quincy girls' 
basketball team is off to a 
slow start, but it defeated 
Quincy, 47-31, in the 
consolation game of the 
North Christmas 

Tournament. 

The North girls 
improved to 2-4, while 
winless Quincy fell to 0-5. 

The Quincy girls had a 
fine first half and only 
trailed, 17-16, at the half. 

North came back after 



the intermission and a 12-2 
run widened its lead to 29- 
18. 

"We didn't play the 
greatest first half for the 
second game in a row, but 
again the girls came out 
and played a real good 
second half," said North 
coach Ken Panaro. 

"We had a tough 
stretch at the beginning of 
the second half," said 
Quincy coach Bob 
Keuther. "They came out 



and scored six quick 
ones." 

Center Joanne Cuneri 
had 13 points to spark 
North, Regina Murphy had 
five points and Sara 
Stanton had a three-point 
play during the 12-2 spurt. 

Christine Richmond had 
a three-point play and 
Kerri Connolly a 
breakaway layup to cut the 
gap to 29-23 for Quincy's 
last gasp. 



Coast Guard Boating 
Skills Course Starts Jan. 10 



The United States 
Coast Guard Auxiliary will 
offer a Boating Skills and 
Seamanship Course, 

Sundays from 9:30 to 
11:30 a.m., beginning Jan. 
10 (registration at 8:30 



a.m.) at Metropolitan 
Yacht Club, 39 Vinedale 
Road, Braintree. 

The course if for first 
time boaters and is a 
review for more 
experienced boaters. 
Subjects include boat 



Registration Underway 
For Ice Skating Classes 



Registration is 
underway for group ice 
skating lessons for children 
and adults at 13 MDC rink 
locations, including the 
William Shea Memorial 
Rink on Willard St., West 
Quincy. 

Classes begin mid- 



January. Participants 
should wear figure or 
hockey skates. 

Cost of the seven-week 
series in $65 per child and 
$75 per adult. For 
registration information, 
call Bay State Ice Skating 
School at 617-965-4460. 



construction, boat 
handling, safety and legal 
requirements, navigation 
rules, aids to navigation, 
piloting, marine engines, 
marlinspike, weather, 
radio-telephone, trailering, 
and locks and dams. 

There is a minimal fee 
for course materials. Pre- 
registration is preferred. 
Call Jerry Faunce (after 6 
p.m.) at 335-8440. 



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NORTH QUINCY'S cheerleaders are, front row, left to right, Lynne Carter, Jenn 
Phipps, Esther Alexander and Carole Blaiklie. Second row, Lauren Rodriguez, Amy 
Grasso, Kerry Connolly, Amy Echelle, Jackie Pellitteri and Andrea Carinci. Back row, 
Tracey Peterson, Stella Plaskasovitis, Katie Ehrlich, Julie Johnston, Katherine 
Hennessey and Sara Walsh. 



5 Quincy Players 
On B.C. High Team 



The Boston College 
High basketball team, 
coached by Quincy's Brian 
Buckley, has an all new 
look this season, having 
lost five starters and 10 
players overall to 
graduation from last year's 
Catholic Conference 
championship team. 

The Eagles, who 
finished 17-5 last year, 
have five Quincy players 
on the squad: Co-Capt. 
Matt Fennessy, a 5-9 



senior point guard; Jay 
Schnabel, a 6-2 senior 
forward; Dan Donovan, a 
6-2 junior forward; Jason 
Fennessy, a 5-11 junior 
guard; and Pat Bryan, a 5- 
1 1 junior guard. 

Fourth-year coach 
Buckley has size but is 
unsure of how his team 
will perform. 

"We have some big 
guys in the middle and ' 
Matt Fennessy can 
definitely handle the point 



guard position, but how we 
do under varsity conditions 
with our tough schedule is 
all up in the air." 

The Eagles' schedule, 
one of the strongest of any 
Eastern Mass. school, in 
addition to the strong 
Catholic Conference 
games, includes Div. 1 
South finalists Durfee and 
Brockton, powerful New 
Bedford and a strong North 
Quincy team. 



Soccer Referee Course At ENC 



The Mass. Referee 
Committee, with the 
assistance of the Quincy 
Youth Soccer League, will 
offer a 16-hour referee 
certification training 
course on Jan. 16 and 17 
from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 
Eastern Nazarene 
College's Lahue Physical 
Education Center. 

The training will 
prepare candidates to take 



the test to be certified as 
Mass. Youth Soccer 
referees. 

The test will be given 
Wednesday, Jan. 20 at a 
site to be announced. The 
cost of the course is $25 
per person. 

The course is open to 
anyone interested in 
becoming familiar with 
and/or learning the rules of 
soccer. 



Anyone wishing more 
information can call the 
soccer office at 472-9033 
and leave a name and 
telephone number. 



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Page 16 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 7, 1993 



Girls Track 



North In Good Start 



The North Quincy girls' 
winter track team is off to 
a good season start with 
wins over Taunton and 
Quincy and turned in some 
fine performances at the 
annual Brown University 
Invitational. 

In a 67-23 win over 
Taunton, North winners 
were Katy Deady, 50-yard 
dash; Sue Hamilton, 300; 
Mel Gaziano, 1000; Erin 
Duggan, mile; Laura 
Blaiklic, two-mile; Jessie 
Ceurvels, 600; Chrissy 
Herman, hurdles; and 
Stacie Minukas, shot put. 
There was a four-way tie 
for the high jump among 
Sue Hamilton, Deady, 
Alyssa Cobban and Linda 
Jellison, and the relay 
team of Deady, Hamilton, 
liana Cobban and Jen 
Nutley also won. 

Placing second were 
Nutley, 300; Alyssa 
Cobban, hurdles; Karen 
Leary, 1000; Erica 
Doherty, mile, and 
Jennifer Walker, shot put. 

Third places were taken 
by liana Cobban, 600, and 
Jen Pineo, shot put. 

In a 62-20 victory over 
Quincy, North winners 
were Deady, 50; Hamilton, 
300; Herman, hurdles; 
Ceurvels, 600; Gaziano, 



Soccer 



1000; Doherty, mile; 
Kristy Kabilian, two-mile, 
and Minukas, shot put. 

Placing second were 
Nutley. 300; Ursula 
Feurtado, 1000; Blaiklie, 
mile; Alyssa Cobban, 
hurdles and high jump iind 
Walker, shot put. 

Quincy scorers were 
Michelle Civitarese, first 
in the high jump; Kasey 
McNaught, second in the 
50; Laura Molina, second 
in the 600; Suzanne 
Civitarese, third in the 
300; Ann Marini, third in 
the 600; Liz Sawan, third 
in the mile; Natasha 
Young, third in the 
hurdles; and the winning 
relay team of Young, 
McNaught, Michelle 
Civitarese and Marini. 

In the Brown 
Invitational the shot put 
relay team of Minukas, 
Walker and Pineo took 
fourth in a 16-team field 
and the freshman- 
sophomore distance 
medley relay team of 
Erica Doherty, Uchechi 
Kalu, Jessie Ceurvels and 
Blaiklie took sixth in a 20- 
team field. 

North qualified six 
individuals and a relay 
team for the state meet in 
the Boston University 
Fastrack meet. State 



qualifiers were Hamilton, 
300; Lewis and Eric Torvi, 
mile; Duggan and 
Blaiklie, two-mile and 
Gaziano, 1000. The mile 
relay team of Hamilton, 
Gaziano, Nutley and 
Ceurvels ran 4:34.4 to 
qualify and junior Jeremy 
Gott, running the 600 in 
1:18.4, topped the 36- 
runner field to win and 
receive an engraved 
plaque. Other good 
performances were by Erin 
Doherty, mile; Josh Walty, 
1000; and Mike Duffy, 
high jump. 

North has been sending 
several freshman to the 
Brown University 
Development series. 
Turning in quality 
performances were 
Jellison, 4-6 in the high 
jump; Pineo, 25-11 in the 
shot put; Ceurveks, 2:50.2 
in the 800, and Phyllis 
Poon, 7.97 in the 55-meter 
dash. 

North Quincy will 
participate in the 
Dartmouth Relays this 
Friday and Saturday. 
Competing will be Deady 
in the 50, Hamilton, 
Nutley and liana Cobban 
in the 400, Blaiklie, 
Duggan and Lewis in the 
two-mile and Heather 
Rendle in the high jump. 



North Boys Finish 
Season Strong 



The North Quincy boys' 
soccer team, which 
showed steady improve- 
ment during a frustrating 
season, finished its season 
on a hopeful note, tying 
Bridge water-Rayoham, 1- 
1, and playing to a 
scoreless tie with Quincy. 

"The tie against 
Bridgewater-Raynham was 
a tremendous game for us, 
as it was the first time any 
team from Quincy bad not 
lost to an Old Colony 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Hare's • ciMnc* to tam 
Mira monay by building a 
Oulncy Sun homa dallvary 
routa. 

Talaphona: 471-3100 



League powerhouse," said 
North coach Bob Dano. 

The tie knocked B-R 
out of contention for first 
place and Silver Lake took 
the championship. The 
game was bard-fought from 
the start with B-R scoring 
30 minutes into the first 
half. 

With eight minutes left 
in the game. North's Bob 
Johnston took a deflected 
ball and fed Dan Danais, 
who scored the tying goal. 

The Raiders played 
outstanding defense with 
goalkeeper Adam Calvert 
playing an exceptional 
game with help from 
MacDougall and defenders 
Brian Fitzeerald. Scott 



McCormick and Ed 
Mitton. Zai Costa and Bo 
Smith also played strong 
games. 

The scoreless tie with 
Quincy at Veterans 
Memorial Stadium again 
featured outstanding 
defense by both teams. 

Fitzgerald and 

MacDougall anchored the 
North defense with Neil 
Hutchinson creating 
several good offensive 
chances. Calvert earned 
his first shutout of the 
season. 

The Raiders finished 
the season at 3-11-2 but 
prospects are bright for 
next season with several 
players returning. 



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Swimming 



North Boys Defeat 
Blue Hills For 2nd Win 



The North Quincy boys' 
swim team defeated Blue 
Hills, 86-74, for its second 
win of the season. 

North will be home to 
New Bedford tomorrow 
(Friday) and will host 
Taunton Thursday, Jan. 14 
at 3:30, all meets at the 
Lincoln-Hancock School 
pool. 

The 200 medley relay 
team of Mike Ploof, Erik 
Delorey, Terence Roche 
and Dan Bermingham won 
its event. 



Ploof won the 200 
individual medley and the 
100 butterfly, Jim Flaherty 
won the 200 and 100 
freestyle, Delorey won the 
50 freestyle, Erik Oster 
won the 500 freestyle, 
AJan Morse won the diving 
and Roche won the 100 
breaststroke. 

North Quincy had 
opened the reason with a 
102-56 victory over Durfee. 

The 200 medley relay 
team of seniors Mike Ploof 
and co-capt. Erik Delorey, 



junior Billy Lee and 
sophomore Dan 

Bermingham won its race. 

Co-capt. Jimmy 
Flaherty won both the 200 
and 500 freestyle and 
Ploof was also a double 
winner, taking the 100 
butterfly and 100 
back.stroke. 

Junior Alan Morse won 
the one meter diving, Lee 
won the 100 breaststroke 
and Bermingham, Ploof, 
Flaherty and Delorey won 
the 200 freestyle relay. 



Youth Football 



Panthers Receive Title 
Trophies At Dinner 



The Quincy Point 
Panthers recently held 
their annual awards night 
banquet at the Fore River 
Clubhouse. 

All players and 
cheerleaders received 
championship trophies for 
their first-place finish in 
the Quincy Youth Football 
League. The Panthers won 
their 20th regular season 
title and were playoff co- 
champions with the North 
Quincy Apaches. 

More than 200 parents, 
family and friends 
attended as the 35 players 
and 18 cheerleaders 
received individual 
awards. 

The following varsity 
awards were presented: 

Most Valuable Player 
(voted by the team), 
David Guntber. 

Coaches Award, Steve 
Roberts and Carmen 
Lorenzano. 

Most Improved, Brian 
MiUer. 

12th Player, Brad 
Smith. 

Memorial Award (for 



Football 



the players that best 
exemplify a Panther both 
on and off the field), 
Richard Garcia and Mark 
Joyce. 

Gunther, Joyce, 
Roberts, Smith, Miller, 
Lorenzano, Garcia and 
Josh Maloney were named 
to the league all-star team. 

The following junior 
varsity awards were given: 

Players' Award, 
Jonathan Brillo. 

Coaches Award, Tom 
Daley. 

Most Improved Player, 
James Bennett. 

12th Player, Andrew 
Sheridan. 

The following 

cheerleader awards were 
presented: 

Most Spirited (voted by 
both varsity and junior 
varsity cheerleaders), 
varsity captain Chrisrine 
Caporale. 

Most Improved, Bonnie 
Ford. 

Most Dedicated, Jana 
Bagen. 

League cheerleader all- 



star awards went to 
Caporale, Lisa Robertson, 
Beth Crowley and Tricia 
Oliva. 

Other members of the 
football team honored 
were Joe Mariano, Jack 
Daley, Dan Smith, Mike 
Martin, Kofi Fraser, Rotha 
Voein, Josh Ackles, 
Richard Carbonneau, Mike 
Cascarano, Brad 

DiMartino, Billy Duke, 
Mike Fraser, Dave 
Geloran, Steve Geloran, 
Chris Kerins, Sean Kerins, 
Nathan Liberman, Rick 
McCaiy, Steve McMahon, 
Mark Miller, Peter Read, 
Joe Walsh and Sean 
Wilkosky. 

Other members of the 
cheerleading squad 
honored include Melissa 
Christopher, Natalie 
DiBona, Amanda Barter, 
Nicolette Martinson, 
Patrice Kelly, Anne Marie 
Garcia, Caito Brillo, 
Elizabeth Dunlea, 
Christina McLaughlin, 
Kristen Perry, Jackie 
White and Jamie 
McCarthy. 



Munroe NCAA All-Star 



Former Quincy High 
all-scholastic and 
Suburban League all-star 
end Sean Munroe was 
rewarded for his record- 
breaking season at 
UMass/Boston by being 
named to the NCAA Div. 3 
all-star team. 

Munroe, the favorite 



Volleyball 



target of his former Quincy 
teammate Steve Austin, 
finished his impressive 
career by catching 10 
Austin passes for 232 yards 
and an NCAA record five 
touchdowns in a game 
against Framingham State. 
His 1693 receiving 
yards this year set an 



NCAA Div. 3 record. 

Although not named to 
the all-star squad, Austin 
had a fantastic season, 
finishing with 2991 yards 
passing, an ECAC Div. 3 
record. In the Framingham 
State game he threw eight 
touchdown passes, tying 
an NCAA Div. 3 record. 



Holly Rendle Earns 4th Letter 



Holly Rendle of Quincy 
recently earned her fourth 
varsity letter as a member 

of the Colgate University 
women's volleyball team. 

Rendle, an outside 
hitter and backcourt 
player, averaged 2.64 digs 
per game, and had 25 
service aces and 50 kills. 



She had a career-high 26 
digs against Connecticut, 
and recorded 19 digs in 
two other matches. 

The Red Raiders had -x 
19-12 overall record iii 
1992 and made their third 
consecutive appearance in 
the Patriot League 
championship match. 

Colgate, which has 



enjoyed 16 straight 
winning seasons, has won 
18 or more matches in 
each of the last five 
seasons. 

Rendle, a sociology- 
anthropology major, is a 
graduate of North Quincy 
High School where she led 
the volleyball team to the 
1987 state championship. 



Hockey 



Thursday. Janimry 7, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 17 



Trio Gives Quincy 
Needed Scoring Punch 



Youth Hockey Jamboree 



4 Advance To Mite 
House Semi-Finals 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

When the season 
started, Quincy hockey 
coach Bob Sylvia said if 
the Presidents could get 
consistent scoring from 
Jeff Craig, Jim Schatzl 
and Sean McArdle, they 
could have a good season. 

So far things have hved 
up to expectations as this 
trio has led Quincy to a 4- 
2-1 record, including a 5-2 
victory over a big, strong 
Bridgewater-Raynham 
team last Saturday at the 
Quincy Youth Arena. 

The Presidents played 
at Plymouth last night 
(Wednesday), will play at 
Falmouth Saturday at 8 
o'clock and will host 
Barnstable next 

Wednesday night at 7:50 
at the Youth Arena. 

Quincy turned in one of 
its better performances to 
topple B-R with Craig 
scoring two goals and 
McArdle, Scott 

MacPherson and Dave 



Mullen one each. 

Mark Gilmore had two 
assists and Mullen, Steve 
Barrett, Joe McPhee and 
Schatzl one apiece. 

Goalie Marie Smith had 
another good night with 27 
saves. 

In their previous game 
the Presidents had to 
battle from behind in the 
final two minutes to tie 
Rockland, 5-5, at 
Rockland. 

Quincy scored a goal in 
the first period but 
Rockland came back with 
three goals in the second. 
Quincy exploded for four 
goals in the third period 
but trailed, 5-3, with two 
minutes to go. 

Schatzl scored with two 
minutes left to move 
Quincy within a goal and 
Craig scored the tying goal 
with 44 seconds remaining. 

Schatzl had another 
goal and MacPherson and 
Steve Provost also scored 
for the Presidents. 



Sophomore Smith had 
21 saves and Anthony 
Farrell had a great game 
in goal for the Bulldogs as 
he came up with 35 saves, 
many of them of the 
spectacular variety. 

Craig has 18 points on 
11 goals and seven assists, 
Schatzl 14 points on five 
points and nine assists and 
McArdle 12 points on five 
goals and seven assists. 

"These three boys are 
scoring as I hoped they 
would and they have done 
a fine job," Sylvia said. 
"The win over 
Bridgewater-Raynham was 
a big one as they have one 
of the biggest and toughest 
teams in the Old Colony 
League. 

"Mark Smith is doing 
an excellent job in goal 
and Dan Morrell, Mark 
Gilmore and Dan Mann 
have played strong 
defense. Morrell in 
particular has been playing 
real aggressive hockey." 



The Paul Harold Club, 
Lydon-Russell, Campbell's 
Auto Service and 
Neponset Valley Survey 
advanced to the semifinals 

of the Mite House League 
jamboree. 

Harold defeated 
Samoset Pharmacy, 6-2, 
with Mark Tetreault and 
Matt Holt having two 
goals apiece and Steve 
McGrath and Matt Gregory 
one each. Holt, Tommy 
Hughes, Colin Maxey and 
Brian Stock had assists. 
Patrick Casper and Steve 
McGonagle scored for 



Samoset. 

Lydon-Russell defeated 
Barry's Deli, 5-3, as Scott 
MacDonald scored twice 
and Jon Paquette, Jimmy 
Cashins and Jon Tallent 
one each. Jordan Virtue 
had two assists and Joe 
Fitzpatrick, MacDonald 
and Brian Petit one each. 
Frank Guest, Ryan Tobin 
and Jeffrey Hunt scored for 
Barry's and David 
Germain, Brianna Nolan 
and Daijoy Sullivan had 
assists. 

Mark Gibbons had two 
goals and Paul Rynn and 
Matt Moriaity one each as 



Campbell's topped Granite 
Rail Pizza, 4-2. John 
Chevalier had two assists 
and Flynn and Matt Alleva 
one each. Ryan Conley 
scored both Granite Rail 
goals and Mike McKeon 
and Michael Steen had 
assists. 

Neponset Valley 
blanked Purdy's Ice 
Cream, 2-0, with goalie 
Ryan Graeber recording 
the shutout. Patrick Lahar 
and Kevin Richardson had 
the goals and Steve Goff, 
Ken Reichel, George 
Snowling and Chris 
Sheehan had assists. 



Colonial, Keohane's 
In Pee Wee Semi-Finals 



North Peppers 
Barnstable Net 



Colonial Federal and 
Keohane's will meet 
tonight (Thursday) at 7:50 
in the semifinals of the 
Pee Wee House League 
jamboree. The winner will 
meet the Morrissey Club, 
which drew a first round 
bye, in the title game 
Friday at 5:30. 

Colonial Federal 
outlasted AU-Star Sports, 
10-9, with Robbie Winter 
having a hat trick, Billy 
Connolly two goals and 



Mark Hawes, Paul 
McCarthy, Andre Nagy 
and Jimmy Hasson a goal 
each. Hasson scored the 
winning goal in an 
overtime shootout. 
McCarthy had three assists 
and Hasson, Connolly, 
Nagy and Billy Graney 
one each. Eric Wood 
exploded for five AU-Star 
goals, Lucas Chenette 
scored two and Shawn 
Manning and Derek 
McTomney one each. 



Keohane's topped 
Marina Bay Taxi, 6-3, 
with Ron Gamel having 
two goals and Bobby Hall, 
Brian Beaton, Mike 
Fitzpatrick and Kevin 
Regan one apiece. Regan, 
Gamel, Mark Foster, and 
Carlos Ashmanskas had 
assists. Justin Doty had 
two goals and John 
Masone one for Marina 
Bay and Tim Lewis, Jason 
Snaith, Steve Veriicco and 
Mark Glynn had assists. 



The North Quincy 
hockey team's victory over 
Barnstable last Saturday 
was reminiscent of a 
Bruins game. 

The Raiders peppered 
the Barnstable goalie with 
43 shots while the Cape 
team had only 11 shots on 
North goalie Sean 
Connolly. 

But, despite the huge 
difference in shots. North 
could just pull out a 3-2 
victory over one of the Old 
Colony League's top 
teams. The Raiders 
improved to 4-1. 



North Quincy hosted 
Silver Lake last night 
(Wednesday), will be 
home to Plymouth 
Saturday at 7:50 at the 
Quincy Youth Arena and 
will face Weymouth next 
Wednesday at 5:30 at the 
Pilgrim rink in Hingham. 

Mike DesRoche 
continued his consistent 
scoring for the Raiders 
with two goals and an 
assist in the big win at 
Barnstable. Jim Sapienza 
scored North's other goal. 
Brendan O'Brien had two 
assists and Andrew 



Vermette and Sapienza 
had one apiece. 

"This was another fine 
win for us," said North 
coach Tom Benson. "We 
should have scored more 
but their goalie, who has 
started for four years, was 
outstanding and had some 
tremendous saves. 

"Connolly has been 
excellent in goal and John 
Gladuc, Vermette, Dave 
Pacino and Dennis Pateras 
have been playing 
outstanding defense for 
us." 



4 In Squirt House Semi-Finals 



The Quincy Sun, 
Granite Auto Electric, 
Johnson Motor and Green 
Environmental played in 
the Squirt House League 
jamboree semifinals. 

Green, defeated in the 
opening round, made the 
semis for the having the 
fewest goals against. 

Granite Auto topped 
Burgin Plainer, 8-3, with 
Frank Curreri and Ryan 
Doyle having hat tricks 
and Paul Burke two goals. 



Pee Wee Bs Advance Squirt Cs Win , Lose 
In State Tourney 



Sean Garvey and Didier 
Alther scored for Green 
with Graham, McShane, 
Matt Gibbons, and Chris 
Griffin having assists. 

Johnson Motor Parts 
defeated Doran & 
Horrigan, 6-3, on goals by 
Shane Kabilian, Tom 
Gouthro, Mark Doyle, 
Mike Cunniff, Kiva Tupe 
and Spike Bertucci. Steve 
King, Cuimiff, Jon Healy 
and Kevin Lynch had 
assists. Chad Fitzpatrick 
scored twice and Robbie 
Bell once for Doran and 

and Tom Gaeta had Patrick Kenney had an 

assists. Andrew Nestor, assist. 



Nick Pizziferri had three 
assists, Curreri two and 
Matt Reggianni and Burke 
one each. Billy Griffin, 
Steve Ford and Sean 
Fennelly scored for Burgin 
and Mike Viles and Joe 
Cox had assists. 

The Quincy Sun edged 
Green Environmental, 4-3, 
on goals by Sean Haidul, 
Sean Adams, Mike 
Carloni and Joe Watson. 
Watson scored the winner 
in an overtime shootout. 
Kevin Mason, Joe Ardagna 



The Quincy Pee Wee B 
hockey team advanced to 
the third round of the state 
championships after solid 
wins over Weymouth and 
Braintree. 

Quincy topped 

Weymouth, 6-1, with two 
goals by Kevin Cellucci 
and one each by John 
Barron, Andre Nagy, 
Bobby Hall and Jonathan 
Haddad. Bill Connolly had 
two assists and Mike 
Powers, Glenn Chase, Tim 
Lewis Brad Macauley one 



apiece. 

Quincy blanked 
Braintree, 4-0, as Connolly 
and Macauley each had 
two goals. Hall, Haddad 
and Barron had two assists 
each. 

John Masone was 
outstanding in goal in both 
games, Mike Sulhvan had 
a pair of fine two-way 
efforts and Matt 
McDonough, Dan Stock, 
Mark Hawes, and Pat 
Coughlin played strong 
defense. 



Quincy's Squirt C 
hockey team won one 
game and lost two in a 
recent tournament in 
Noithboro. 

Quincy lost to Medford, 
4-1, in its opening game 
with Chris Lumaghini 
scoring the only goal. Tom 
Gouthro and Nfike Sullivan 
had assists and Brian 
Correia played strong 
defense. 

Quincy bowed to 
Ashland-Holliston, 4-2, in 
game two with Sean 
McCusker scoring 
unassisted and Sean 
Lefebvre scoring the 



second with an assist for 
Tom Gaeta. Nick Pizziferri 
was excellent in goal. 

Quincy exploded for a 
9-1 victory over 
Woonsocket, R.I., in the 
third game with Andy 
Nestor and Lefebvre 
having hat tricks and 
Lumaghini, Mike Carloni 
and Gaeta a goal each. 
Lumaghini, Shane 
Kabilian, Sullivan, 
Carloni, Gaeta, Lefebvre 
and Nestor had assists. Pat 
O'Donnell had a strong 
game in goal and 
Pizziferri played strong 
defense. 



Morrissey Pounds Keohane's 



The league-leading 
Morrissey Club pounded 
Keohane's, 1 1-4, and holds 
a three-point lead in the 
Pee Wee House League. 

Mike Gallagher, Pat 
McGann and Mike Ryan 
had two goals apiece and 
Bobby Harvey, Scott 
Cooper, John Barron, 
Owen Nestor and Brian 



Gates one each. Barron 
had three assists and Brian 
Ehrlich, Cooper, Nestor, 
Brian Degan, Harvey and 
McGann one each. 

Ron Gamel had a hat 
trick and Kevin Regan a 
goal for Keohane's. Carlos 
Ashmanskas had two 
assists and Mark Foster 
one. 



The standings: 

Morrissey Qub, 9-3-1; All- 

Star Sports, 7-3-2; Marina 



Bay Taxi, 5-7-0; 
Keohane's, 3-7-3; Colonial 
Federal, 3-7-2. 



More Sports 
On Page 18 




by Tony Centorino, Bill Starkie and Kevin McGroarty 

NOT-SCM>ELIGHTFUL SQUEALING 

dition and tension. 

HINT: In general, belts 
should deflect no more than 
a half-inch when pressed 
at a point midway between 
pulleys. 

At LEO & WALT'S 
SUNOCO we do our best 
to make sure that your car 
runs well every season of 
the year. If you will be doing 
much traveling this winter, 
keep in mind there's noth- 
ing worse than setting out 
on a trip and finding your- 
self stuck in an auto repair 
shop miles from home. So 
get a thorough examination 
of your car 258 Quincy Ave . , 
E. Braintree, 843-1550 be- 
fore you leave. Hours: Mon- 
Fri 6 am- 9 pm, Sat, 7 am- 
9 pm, Sun. 9 am-5 pm. 'A 
Place Whera Your Car Can 
Live Longer.' 



When drivers notice 
high-pitched squeals com- 
ing from under their auto- 
mobiles' hoods that grow 
louder upon acceleration, 
loose belts are probably the 
culprits. If the noise tends to 
subside, its underlying 
cause should not be ig- 
nored. Because belts are 
tied to the function of such 
critical auto components as 
the fan and alternator, their 
failure could lead to engine 
overheating or loss of power 
down the road. The air con- 
ditioner or power steering 
mechanism could also be 
similarly affected. Conse- 
quently, prompt attention to 
a loose or failing belt could 
prevent a breakdown or 
component failure. Better 
yet, it is a good idea to an- 
ticipate belt prot>lems with 
regular checks of belt corv 



Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 7, 1993 



r 



:::^i|ii<iiiii.^BP^Siii:::ffy.iWy::*]^yjiy:Wf^^ 



l^EOAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

PROBATE COURT 

Norfolk, ss. 

No. 92D-1780-D1 

JUDrm M. LUNDBOHM 

Plaintiff 

vs 

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION 

JAMES L. LUNDBOHM 

Defendant 
To the above-named 
Defendant: 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court by 
the Plaintiff. Judith M. 
Lundbohm, seeking a 
divorce, for Cruel and 
Abusive Treatment. 

You are required to 
serve upon Brian F. 
Gilligan, plaintiff's 
attorney, whose address 
is 480 Adams Street, 
Milton, MA 02186, your 
answer on or before March 
3. 1993. If you fail to do 
so, the Court will proceed 
to the hearing and 
adjucation of this action. 
You are also required to 
file a copy of your answer 
in the office of the Register 
of this Court at Dedham. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esq., First Judge of 
said Court at Dedham. 
December 9th, 1992 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
RESTER OF PROBATE 

12/24,31/92 1/7/93 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P0146E1 
Notice of 
Fiduciary's Account 

To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
ELROY ORINGER AKA 
ROY ORINGER late of 
Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 72 that the First 
and Final account(s) of 
Dorothea B. Oringer and 
Paul J. Gallagher 
Temporary and Permanent 
as Executors 

Administrator/ Administra- 
trix--(the fiduciary) of said 
estate has-have been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to 
preserve your right to file 
an objection to said 
account(s), you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before the 
third day of February, 1 993 
the return day of this 
citation. You may upon 
written request by 
registered or certified mail 
to the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy 
of said account(s). If you 
desire to object to any item 
of said account(s), you 
must, in addition to filing a 
written appearance as 
aforesaid, file within thirty 
days after said return day 
or within such other time 
as the Court upon motion 
may order a written 
statement of each such 
item together with the 
grounds for each objection 
thereto, a copy to be 
served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 5. 

Witness, Robert M. 

Ford, Esquire, First 

Justice of said Court at 

Dedham this thirty-first 

day of December, 1 992. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/7/93 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P2962E1 
Estate of ISABELLA M. 
WALSH late of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK. 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that GEORGE 
T. DEFORGE of FRANKLIN 
in the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executor 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on orj 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 3, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-thira 
day of December, on 
thousand nine hundre 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHE 
REGISTER OF PROBATE! 

1/7/93 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P2980E1 
Estate of JENNIE M. 
McSWEENEY late of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that 
KATHLEEN M. 

McSWEENEY of QUINCY 
in the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executrix 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 3, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-third 
day of December, one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-tow. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
1/7/93 

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Busy Schedule For 
Pee Wee A's 



Squirt A's Win 3 



Quincy's Pee Wee A 
hockey team had a busy 
schedule, playing eight 
games during the school 
vacation period. 

The team defeated 
Medfield, 7-1, and lost to 
Canton, in Greater Boston 
League games. 

Against Medfield Eric 
Wood and Chris Haidul 
had two goals apiece and 
Scott Cooper, Tim Wood 
and Mark Glynn one each. 
Bill Franey Derek 
McTomney had assists. 

In the Canton game 
Cooper, Mike Fitzpatrick 
and Eric Wood scored the 
goals and Rob Winter, 
Haidul, Eric Wood and 
Brian Degan had assists. 

During Christmas week 
the team traveled to 
Rhode Island to play in the 
CICF Tournament. It 
advanced to the 
championship game where 
it lost a 4-3 overtime 
decision. The team posted 
a 3-1 record in the tourney. 

In the title game Mark 
Glynn's rocket shot rang 
wide off the goal post and 
the Northern R.I. Vikings 
then scored on a rebound 
in the crease that goalie 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



LBOAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfoll< Division 

Docl<et No. 92P2950E1 
Estate of MADELINE 
ELIZABETH WEISS AKA: 
MADELINE WEISS late of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that 
LORRAINE ELIZABETH 
BAKER of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executrix 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 3, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-third 
day of December, one 
thousand nine hundred 
arxj ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/7/93 



Brian Beaton couldn 
cover. 

Glynn, Haidul and Mi* e 
Ryan scored for Quincy. 
Beaton was named tl^e 
game MVP. 

The Pee Wee A's then 
returned to GB^ 
competition and edged a 
strong Waltham squad, 3- 
2, with Winter, Eric Wood 
and Ryan scoring the goals 
and Eric Wood and Copper 
having assists. 

In earlier games the 
Pee Wee A's had two 
victories to improve their 
record at that time to 4-0. 

Quincy defeated 
Waltham, 7-2, Eric Wood 
had two goals and three 
assists and Chris Haidul, 
Billy Graney, Robbie 
Winter, Scott Cooper and 
Tim Wood a goal each. 
Steve Verlicco had two 
assists and Ryan and 
Winter one apiece. 

Quincy also topped 
Chariest own, 7-2, coming 
from behind after 
Charlestown scored two 
early goals. Cooper had k 
hat trick and Ryan, 
Graney, Winter and Mark 
Glynn a goal each. Glynn 
had three assists and 
Ryan, Derek McTomney 
and Brian Degan one 
apiece. Brian Beaton stood 
out in goal and Chris 
DiMattia, Matt Langille, 
Verlicco and Tim Wood 
played strong defense. 



Quincy's Squirt A 
hockey team defeated 
Needham, 5-3, in the 
Greater Boston League 
and recorded wins over 
Warwick, R.I., and St. 
Moritz in a Christmas 
tournament in Warwick. 

In the Needham game 
Chad Fitzpatrick had a 
goal and two assists. Sean 
Garvey, Sean Haidul, 
Spike Bertucci and Mike 
Welch had the other goals, 
Dan Kennedy and Jesse 
Winter each had two 
assists and Haidul one. 

Quincy hammered 
Warwick, 8-3, with 
Kennedy having two goals 
and two assists and Welch 



two goals and an assist. 
Jimmy Sullivan, Ryan 
Barrett, Paul Markarian 
and Fitzpatrick had a goal 
apiece, Joe Ardagna, 
Barrett and Fitzpatrick two 
assists each and Winter 
and Steven Ford one 
apiece. 

Quincy blanked St. 
Moritz, 4-0, behind the 
outstanding work in goal of 
Chris Carthas. Fitzpatrick 
had two goals and Sullivan 
and Kennedy one each. 
Ardagna had two assists 
and Ford one. Pat Kenney, 
Markarian, Billy Griffin, 
Brian Nolan and Ford 
played strong defense. 



Executive Hockey 



Boyle*s Lead Beacon Sports; 

South Shore Bearing Wins, 

Flibotte's, Fowler Tie 



WWPWfWWHifWVP 



COMMONWEALTH OF , 
MASSACHUSETTS ; 
THE TRIAL COURT 
PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docl<et No. 92P2954E1 

Estate of LAURA 

SALVUCCI late of QUINCY 

in the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has beem 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will and codicil 
of said decedent be 
proved and allowed and 
that ALMA G. TUFFO of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 3, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-third 
day of December, one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/7/93 



The Boyle family 
teamed up for six goals as 
Beacon Sports defeated 
Adams Sports, 9-2, in 
Quincy Executive League 
hockey action. 

Brothers Artie and Bob 
Boyle scored two goals 
each and father Art and 
brother Mike added single 
goals. Kevin Jago, Skip 
Manganaro and Peter 
DiBona also scored for 
Beacon. 

DiBona had five assists, 
Jago three, Artie Boyle 
two, and Mike Boyle, Bob 

liiiiiiliiiil^^ 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE COURT 

AND FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P2972E1 
Estate of JOHN H. 
NORTON late of Quincy In 
the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that HELEN A. 
MURRAY of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executrix 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 3, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-third 
day of December, one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/7/93 



Boyle, Dennis Bertoni, 
Manganaro and Jack Valle 
one each. 

Jack Fowkes, assisted 
by Bibby Lewis and Mark 
Giordani, and Gerry Kelly, 
assisted by John 
McCarthy, scored for 
Adams. 

Flibotte's Auto Sales 
and Fowler House skated 
to a 3-3 tie as Fowler 
House's Rich Gibbs scored 
with seven minutes to 
play. Peter Janis and Ed 
Linehan also scored for 
Fowler. Bill Blaser, Gibbs 
and Glen Snaith. 

Jim Cooney had two 
goals and Mark Paolucci 
one for Flibotte's. Doug 
McLean had two assists 
and Paolucci, Glen 
Ferguson and Ed Norton 
had one each. 

Frankie Guest tallied a 
hat trick and assisted on 
two other goals to lead 
South Shore Bearing to an 
8-7 win over Grumpy 
White's Pub. 

Bob Carroll, Jack 
Aldred, Tom Cahill, Scott 
Richardson and Ken 
Gardiner also scored. 
Richardson and Cahill had 
three assists each, Aldred 
two, and Bob Carroll one. 

Mike O'Connell and 
Paul Messina scored two 
goals each for Grumpy's 
and Ted Viles, Mark 
Boultier and Mark 
Andrews also scored. 
Messina, Rick Joyce, 
Boultier and Dick McCabe 
had two assists each and 
Paul Veneziano, Andrews 
and Viles also had assists. 



Sun 
Classified 



Ads 



Results 



Thursday, January 7, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 19 




i:E<sii^liilcsiS 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
PROBATE COURT 
Norfolk, ss. 

No. 92D1829-D1 

MARYTHIBEAULT 

plaintiff 

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION 

vs. 
ROLAND THIBEAULT. JR. 
Defendant 
To the above-named 
Defendant: 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court by 
the Plaintiff Mary 
Thibeault, seeking a 
divorce. 

You are required to 
serve upon Regina Healy, 
Esq., of Healy, Fiske, and 
Woodbury, plaintiff's 
attorney, whose address 
is 189 Cambridge Street, 
Cambridge, MA 02141 your 
answer on or tiefore March 
3, 1993. If you fail to do 
so, the Court will proceed 
to the hearing and 
adjucation of this action. 
You are also required to 
file a copy of your answer 
in the office of the Court at 
Dedham. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esq., First Judge of 
said Court at Dedham. 
December 9, 1992 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGBTER OF PROBATE 

12/24,31/92 1/7/93 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

AND FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 91 P2793E1 
Estate of WILLIAM M. 
SHIPPS late of QUINCY In 
the County of Norfolk 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that JOHN A. 
SHIPPS of WRENTHAM in 
the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executor 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 3, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
F^ord, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-third 
day of December, one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/7/93 



Save Ga» and Money 
Shop Locally 



EVERYBODY'S MARKETPUCE 



tHER$ONfti 



FORRENt 



Wishing everyone a 
Happy, Healthy and Pros- 
perous New Year. Thank 
you for your support 
Ed Ryan Plastering 
328-5046 1/7 



Thank You 
St. Jude 



c.a 1/7 



PRAYER TO THE 

BLESSED VIRGIN 

(Never Known to Fail) 

Oh most beautiful 
flower of Mt. Camiel, Fruitful 
vine, splendor of Heaven, 
Blessed Mother of the Son of 
God, Immaculate Virgin, Assist 
me in my necessity. Oh Star of 
the Sea, help me and show me 
herein you are my mother. Oh, 
Holy Mary, Mother of God, 
Queen of Heaven and Earth! I 
humbly beseech you from the 
bottom of my heart to succor me 
in this necessity. There are none 
that can withstand your power. 
Oh, show me herein you are my 
mother. Oh Mary conceived 
without sin,prayforus who have 
recourse to thee (3x) Holy 
Mother, I place this cause in 
your hands (3x) Holy Spirit, you 
who solve all problems, light 
roads so that I can attain my 
goal. You who gave me divine 
gift to forgive and forget all evil 
against me and that in all in- 
stances in my life you arc with 
me. I want in this short prayer to 
thank you for all things as you 
confirm once again that I never 
want to be separated from you in 
etemal glory. Thank you foryour 
mercy toward me and mine. The 
person must say this prayer 3 
consecutive days. After 3 days 
the request will be granted. This 
prayer must be published after 
the favor is granted. 

A.M.D 1/7 



HAIFA 
DOZEN 
WAYS 
TO EARN 
AN EARLY 
RETIRE- 
MENT. 

1. Kat hii<h-fat, hinh- 
cholesterol foods. 

2. Smoke. 

.'{. ItJnore >()iir hijjh 

blood pressuff. 
I. Hea\il> salt t'\fr>- 

thin^; ><>ii t-al. 
,T. Put on extra weinht. 
H. Stop exeriisinji 

re><ularl>. 

Follov* tht'Sf slt-ps and 
\oii could retirt'from 
work, and from life, s<H)ner 
than vou planned. 



American Heart 
Association 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Newly Renovated 
Sent of Italy Social Center 
Golden Lion Suite 
Capacity - 300 
Venetian Room 
Capacity - 140 
Call 472-SWM) 



SERVrCES 



i m i m iii UM ( » mMMM I » * ??f1 > lffTPilwtl' l t!|»M t inn i Hrn « 



SERVICES 



SERVrCES 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-S967 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings, Showers. 

Meetings, Banquets 

Elks Home, 440 E Squantum St 

Ouinfy 

472-2223 

T£ 

HALL FOR RENT 

Nickerson Post No. 382 

American Legion, Squantum, MA 

Handicapped Accessible. 

Capacity 90 or less. 

Call 328-9824 

MorxJay through Satuiday 4-7pniTF 

2 HALLS FOR RENT 

George F. Bryan Post 

1 suitat>ie for large functions 
(350-t- people); other suited for 
small functions (120 people). 
Call the George F. Bryan Post 

Call 472-6234 m 

iiiiiiiiiilBiiiit 

HOUSE INSPECTORS 

No Exp. Necessary. Up 

to $800 Wkly. Will Train. 

Ca// (2 19)-769-6649 

EXT H5046 9 A.M. 

to 9 P.M. 7 days ^„^ 




EXPERT 

lAMP REPAIR 
t REWIRING 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
OUINCY TF 



PRQFESSQNAL 

RERMR 
WIND(3VS 
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77>-?7II 

v.ouMa noiMa mamtmi 



JUST $7.99/HR! 

(PLUS TRIP - $6.50 max.) Win- 
dow, carpet and housedeaning, 
leaf raking, assemt>ly, painting, 
arxi much more! Joe 773-1084. 
Since 1 979. Free Estimates 1/7 



Window Coverings 



Verticals • Reated Shades 
Mini Blinds • Cellular Shades 
Draperies • Coordinates 
Measuring 
& Installation 



Interior Painting 



Paint any room and receive 
IJ:IJJ Mini Blinds 
Call MJC Enterprises 
508-607-5381 ^^>^ 



A&T VACUUM 

•19.95 Overhaul Special on 
any vacuum 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 
•Sharpening 

(scissors, knives, etc.) 

• Oreck XL Vacuums $249 

• Eledrolux w/power nozzle 

$199. 

• Used vacuums $45 & up 

27BealeSt.,Wollaston 
47&-5066 TF 

HANDYMAN/ELECTRICIAN 

Meet or Beat any price 

Senflce Changes a Specialty 

• All Work Guaranteed • No job 

too small • Licensed & Insured 

(617)479-1319 2,, 



CHRISTIAN DATING 

& FRIENDSHIP 

SERVICE 

Free Intormation packet 
1-800-829-3283 m 



TAX RETURNS 

Very Very Low Rates 

Richard 0. McDonough, EA 

Professional Sen/ice 

in Your Home 
20 Years Experience 
472-2694 415 



Your 3outli Short 

HMdqiMfter* 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 
& APPLIANCE 

1 15 Franklin St . So Ouincy 
4/2-1710 

TF 



PRECKOM 

LAMP 
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REWIRING 





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mmfm 



SIESTA SLEEP SHOP 

Mattress Warehouse Bar- 
gains. Roiiaway cots, 
trundles, headboards, etc. 
Opposite Reebok & BJ's 
Routes 139-24 

963-2000 1/28 



wUUullililiilUiUiulNil^^ 



UiiUilililililililUuu^^ 



* 



GOVERNMENT HOMES 

from $1 (U Repair). Delin- 
quent tax property. Repos- 
sessions. Your area (1 ) 805- 
962-8000 Ext. GH-3019 for 
current repo list. i/ze 



NEWSCARRIEhS 
WANTED 
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Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



PROANE 

20 LB. TANK 

DCHANGE 

$7.gQ 

wEsrcuwcroMx 
4l2-«50 VE8T0UNCY 



MOVIES 
FOR SALE 

Call 
479-4539 



1/7 



Typesetting Equipment 
For Sale 

2 Varityper Compact 351 

with Fonts 

1 Selectline PermaKwik 
Processor 

BEST OFFER 

The Quincy Sun 

1372 Hancock Street 

Quincy 02169 

471-3100 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



I 

I INDEX 
I 

I 



a Services 

D For Sale 

a Autos 

a Boats 

O For Rent 

a Wanted 

D Help Wanted 

a Pels, LIveslocK 

D Lost and Found 

a Real Estate For Sale 

D Real Estate Wanted 

a Miscellaneous 

O Work Wanted 

a Antiques 

a Coins A Slamos 

O Rest Homes 

a Instruction 

Day Care 

O Personal 

D Electrical A Appliances 



RATES 
1WEEK 
9-7 WEEKS 

1-12 WEEKS 

13 WEEKS 
OR MORE 



D $5.00foronein«artlon,upto20wordt, 1W for each additional word. 

D $4.80 per Inaertlon up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of the same ad. 

^09 each additional word. 
D $4.30 per inaertlon up to 20 words for 8-12 insertion* of the same ad. 

109 more each additional word. 
D $4.00 per Insertion up to 20 words for 13 or more Insertions of the 

same ad, 10( each additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ — 
in The Ouincy Sun 



Jor the following ad to run 



-weeks 



COPY: 



NO REFUND WIU M MAM AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT Of CANCELLATION. 
DffAOLmE: MONDAY. Mt PJi. MEASE INCLUDE YOUR mONE NUMBER M AD. 



Page 20 Qu'ncy Sun Thursday, January 7, 1993 



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Thank You. Thank You. 

We thank the general public for the very warm reception you gave 
to us during the recent City of Quincy Christmas Festival Season 
programs. The largest crowds ever attended these holiday 
events. We wish you all a very happy and heathy New Year! 

^briBtmasJfffstJual Committee 



The 41st Consecutive 



% 



Christmas Parade Viewed By One Of The 
Largest Crowds Ever, Over 250,000 People 




(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 



Grand Marshal John Giliis 




■Stt^tinuttg 



THE WINNER - First prize in the 41st annual Qolncy Christmas Festival 
Parade's noncommercial float category went to Quincy H^ School for its 
entry, "Parading Thru The Days." 




WOODWARD SCHOOL placed second in the noncommercial float 
category with its "Christmas Is A Ball." 



SHOWN BELOW ARE THE MAJOR SPONSORS OF THIS YEAR'S 
41st ANNUAL CITY OF QUINCY CHRISTMAS PARADE. 

JTh^Fatriot 





I 



^ FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTORS The Festival Committee and a grateful general public ^ 
Si sincerely thank these organizations and businesses that contributed financially in support ?( 
i^ of the 1992 Christmas Festival Season programs ... without your support these holiday li|[ 



^ festival events would not be possible! 

^ • r-resiaenis riace Associates . Manet Management 

Sk if Christmas iic Santa's i^ Nativity i^ Santa's if Ttie Annual if Elementary 

*" Lighting Arrival " " " "" ' ' " ^ - 



BayBank 

Burke Distributing Co. (Miller, Miller Lite) 
' The Boston Five 
George F. Bryan VFW Post 613 
Colonial Federal Savings 
Campanelli Industries 
Curry Hardware 
Bank of Boston 

N.Q. Business & Professional Assoc. 
Presidents Place Associates 



Keohane Funeral Home 
The Cooperative Bank 
The Quincy Savings Bank 
The Quincy Sun 
South Boston Savings 
The South Shore Bank 
SS&B Realty 
Shawmut Banks 
QCBPA 



• WJDA 

> Stop & Shop Supermarkets 

> Bradlees Dept. Store 

> Continental Cablesystems 

• Quincy Rotary Club 

> State VFW Ladies Auxiliary 
'Jack Conway Real Estate 

> Barry's Oeli/Ship Haven Rest. 
'Wollaston Credit Union 







Pageant Mailtx)xes Awards Event School Christmas 

Poster Contest 



From the 



G 



eason'si nreetinqs 



Christmas Festival 



Committee Members 



Kathy Bubas, Mary Blood, Bryant Carter, 
Eileen Cohen, Kevin Cook, Mary Jane Fandel, 

Ed Fiddler, Frances Flynn, Herb Fontaine, 

Rita Kelleher, Paul Kennedy, Mike McFarland, 

Tom McFarland, Ann Morrill, Bill Morrill, 

Chief Francis Mullen, Jack Nigro, Andrea White, <S 

Bob Noble, Gloria Noble, Joe Pearson, Laurel Peddie, wj 

Al Petta, Bernie Reisberg, Tony Siciliano, ^ 

Patricia Toland, Agnes Trillcott and George White. Ijj 



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•JlfrJ»rJ»rJX-J»rJ»rJ»r:»rJ».ii!r.J»rJ»rJ»rJ»rJ»rJ».-JX-J»rJ».-J^^^ 



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'F^M.^i 


691 ■^0 'f-'^i 'AouTTiO 


VOL.25 No. 17 


Thursday, January 14, 1993 \ 





NEWLY APPOINTED Quincy 2000 executive director Charles D'Aprix, left, confers 
with Thomas Galvln, chairman of the board, president and CEO. D'Aprix, hired hired 
by the corporation's board of directors last week, will begin his duties Jan. 19. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 

Charles D'Aprix Hired By Board 

Quincy 2000 Director 

To Reach Out To All 

Segments Of Community 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

The newly named 
executive director of The 
Quincy 2000 Corporation 
promises to reach out to 
all segments of the 
community to help identify 
future programs and 
projects designed to 
rejuvenate the city's 
business districts. 

In an interview with 
The Quincy Sun Tuesday, 
Charles F. D'Aprix said, 
"My first priority will be to 
reach out and solicit as 
many views from as many 
different segments of the 
community as possible. 

"I will also begin to 
meet with community 
leaders, including the 
mayor, board members, 
merchants and other key 
members of the business 



community, to solicit their 
views. 

"This type of work 
cannot be done in a 
vacuum. It demands 
involvement from every 
segment of the community. 
I'll leave no stone 
unturned," he said. 

To help gather ideas 
and views pertaining to 
economic revival in 
Quincy, D'Aprix said he 
plans to conduct a 
scientific poll or research 
survey. 

Using results from the 
survey and information 
gathered from consulting 
with civic leaders, the 
director said he will 
identify programs and 
projects "that can be 
started at once." 

Programs and projects 



may include incentives for 
facade improvements to 
local businesses and 
targeting parcels for 
development. 

"It will definitely 
include marketing 
Quincy's assets," he 
added. 

Quincy 2000 is 
expected to play an 
instrumental role in a plan 
to develop the city-owned 
Hancock Parking Area 
across from the Quincy 
District Court. D'Aprix 
said he endorses the plan 
"100 percent." 

D'Aprix, 35, was 
selected executive director 
of the Quincy 2000 
Corporation at a board of 
directors meeting held Jan. 
8 at the Quincy 

(Cont'd on Page 12) 



Residents Urged To Join 
Sewer-Water Campaign 



Residents are being 
urged to join a letter 
writing campaign to try to 
secure federal funding to 
offset rising sewer-water 
bills. 

Ward 1 City Councillor 
Peter Kolson introduced a 
resolve Monday that the 
city support the efforts of 
Mayor James Sheets and 
Congressman Gerry Studds 
towards refunding of the 
federal Clean Water Act 
to assist in the reduction of 



sewer-water bills in the 
MWRA region. 

"This is where we can 
get money for the Boston 
Harbor cleanup," said 
Councillor-at-Large 
Michael Cheney. "Seventy 
percent of residents water- 
sewer bills can be paid by 
the federal government" 

"This is our window of 
opportunity," Kolson said. 

He asks that all citizens 
write letters asking for rate 
relief to Studds or 
President-elect Bill 



Clinton. Kolson said the 
letters may be sent to City 
Hall (Council office), 
1305 Hancock St., Quincy, 
02169. 

"And I will hand carry 
them to Congressman 
Studds' office (in Quincy 
Center)," Kolson said. 

"Now is the time to do 
it," Cheney said. "Once 
this opportunity passes we 
may not get another 
chance." 

-■STEVE KAVANAGH 



City Council Meeting Changed To Jan. 25 



The City Council 
meeting scheduled for Jan. 
19 has been postponed and 
rescheduled to Monday, 
Jan. 25 at 7:30 p.m. at City 
Hall. 



Also, the council's 
Education Committee will 
meet Monday, Feb. 1 at 7 

p.m. to discuss the addition 
to the Bemazzani School, 



the construction of a new 
school at the site of the 
former Lincoln School and 

a change of governance at 
Quincy College. 



'Connector Road Needed, 
Would Cause More Demolition' 

Cahill Says Hancock 

Retail Plan Has 

'Too Many Holes' 

By STEVE KAVANAGH 

City Councillor-at-Large Timothy Cahill this week criticized Mayor James 
Sheets' plan to develop the Hancock parking area in Quincy Center. 



"There are so many 
holes in the plan... it 
doesn't make sense," said 
Cahill, chairman of the 
council's Downtown 
Economic Development 
Committee. 

"I don't think the plan 
will work as proposed," 
Cahill said. "I think there 
are other developable sites 
downtown that are more 
feasible." 

"I think it's a great 
project," Sheets said. "It's 
time we move forward to 
improve the character of 
the downtown." 

The mayor said he is 
receptive to new ideas for 
downtown development 
from Cahill and others. 

"We welcome any 
ideas Councillor Cahill 
has and anything we feel 
are workable we would 



work to incorporate," 
Sheets said. 

Cahill said he would 
prefer to see development 
of the vacant lot at the 
former Kincaide Furniture 
site and the lot at the site 
of the former Strand 
Theater. He said city 
officials should be open to 
changing zoning 

ordinances restricting 
height and density 
downtown. 

Sheets said those 
locations don't offer 
enough space and don't 
cure the problems of 
access or parking. Also, 
today's retailers want 
ground floor space, he 
said. 

The mayor's plan calls 
for tearing down 
businesses on Hancock St. 
and Cottage Ave. which 



border the parking area. 

"I think it's wrong to 
tear down viable 
businesses," Cahill said. 
"You could add without 
taking away from the tax 
base" by developing 
vacant lots instead. "We 
have to bring more people 
into the city." 

"The fact remains we 
are going to use the 
Hancock lot," Sheets said. 
"It remains to be seen if 
we will take all the stores 
named in the RFP but we 
really need to open up 
Hancock St. to change the 
character." 

Cahill said a connector 
road from Route 3 or the 
Southeast Expressway is 
necessary to make the 
plan viable. He said 
construction of a connector 

(Cont'd on Page 12) 



Council Approves Pay 
Raises For Police, Laborers 



The City Council 
approved pay raises 
Monday for police 
patrolmen, police superior 
officers, the personnel 
director and members of 
the Laborers Union, Local 
1139. 

The Council voted 7-1 
in each case with 
Councillor-at-Large 
Timothy Cahill voting 
against all four raises. 

"My problem with pay 
raises stems from a 
disagreement with this 
administration on how 



good the financial 
situation of the city is," 
Cahill said. 

"I have no problem with 
people getting raises," 
Cahill said. "I would like 
to see those people get 
those raises when the city 
can afford it." 

Other councillors 
disagreed with Cahill. 

"For over two years no 
one (city employees) has 
got a pay raise," said 
Ward 5 Councillor Charles 
Pbelan. "These raises are 
not exorbitant." 



"We can't balance the 
budget on the backs of our 
employees," said 
Councillor-at-Large 
Michael Cheney. 

"Not two months ago 
we were arguing over 
raising taxes and we said 
we had no control over 
fixed costs," Cahill said. 
"Well, here is an area we 
do have control over. 

"As long as we are in a 
recession, I think we have 
to be carehil," he said. 

"STEVE KAVANAGH 



Toland Seen Asst. Clerk 
Despite Cheney Proposal 



City Councillor-at- 
Large Patricia Toland 
appears to have enough 
support to land the 
assistant city clerk job. 

But fellow Councillor 
Michael Cheney has 
proposed that the post be 
made a part-time position. 

Cheney's proposal, 
which was not discussed 
during Monday's City 
Council meeting, was 
submitted to the coimcil's 
Ordinance Committee and 
could be reviewed at the 
Jan. 25 meeting. 




PATRICIA TOLAND 

The State Ethics 
Commission has ruled that 
Toland must resign her 



council seat before she 
can be nominated for the 
assistant cleik position. 

Cheney has said that 
the post can be filled on a 
part-time basis which 
would save the city 
money. The full-time job 
pays $31,300. 

City Clerk Joseph Shea 
said his department has a 
smaller staff but more 
duties than similar size 
area communities. Shea 
said he would like to see 
the job remain a full-time 
position. 



?■(• 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 14, 1993 




SPECIAL STOCKING STUFFERS-Newborn Dylan Reed of Quincy, far left, and two 
other infants, Brenton McTigue of Weymouth and Stephen Welch of Braintree, were 
born at the South Shore Hospital's new maternity center during the holidays. Before 
their "sleigh ride" home, they were slipped into stockings provided by Friends of SSH, 
the hospital's 700-member auxiliary. With the infants is staff nurse Janet Plausse. 

Change In Work Hours 

Saves Former Quincy 

Woman From Massacre 



A fonner North Quincy 
resident who luckily 
avoided being part of a 
gruesome murder scene in 
Illinois last weekend said 
Monday she will be afraid 
to leave her home until 
police catch the person 
responsible for the death of 
her co-workers. 

Debora Barrett, 29, an 
employee of Brown's 
Chicken in Palatine, 111., 
discovered Saturday 
morning that the two 
owners and five co-workers 
were found slain in a 
freezer compartment at the 
restaurant. The murders 
apparently took place the 



night before. 

Barrett, who has been 
employed by the restaurant 
for about two months, used 
to work Friday evenings at 
Brown's until her hours 
were cut back to part-time 
status shortly after 
Christmas. The change in 
her work schedule may 
have saved her life. 

Barrett said Monday the 
nature of the murders 
made her believe that the 
motive was more than 
robbery and that the killer 
may be a psychopath. 
Police are interviewing 
fonner employees of the 
restaurant, apparently 
looking for someone who 



might have had a grudge 
against the owners. 

Among those killed 
Friday night were co- 
owners Richard Ehlenfeldt, 
50, and his wife, Lynn, 49; 
Rico Solis, 17; Michael 
Castro, 18; Thomas 
Mennes, 32; Guadalupe 
Maldonado, 48, and 
Marcus Nellsen, 31. 

Palatine, 111. is 
approximately 30 miles 
northwest of Chicago. 
Barrett and her husband, 
Bryan, moved there from 
Buiffalo in August after he 
received a promotion from 
his employer, Kemper 
Insurance. 



Crime Map Comes 
Under Council F ire 



Ward 1 City Councillor 
Peter Kolson was joined 
by several other 
councillors Monday in 
criticizing The Patriot 
Ledger for printing a map 
which shows break-ins 
which occur in Quincy. 

Kolson asked that the 
Ledger discontinue the 
map or print a crime map 
of all other communities 
served by the Ledger. 

"People feel they are 
being singled out," Kolson 
said. "I think we have 
become the laughing stock 
of the South Shore." 

"The map tells other 
people that there is crime 
in Quincy and not 
anywhere else," said 
Councillor-at- Large 
Michael Cheney. 

Kolson said the map 
could give Quincy an 
image problem which 
could impact property 
values. 

Ward 4 Councillor 
Thomas Fabrizio said in 
addition to the map being 
unfair the accompanying 
log of break-ins can be 
misleading in that it does 
not explain the disposition 
of each case. 



"Why just Quincy?" 
asked Councillor-at-Large 
Timothy Cahill. "The 
Patriot Ledger stopped 
being a Quincy newspaper 
a long time ago." 

Cahill said the map and 
log of break-ins is good in 
that "it let's people know 
what's going on. 

"I don't disagree with 
the intent, but with the 
way it is done." 

Ward 5 Councillor 
Charles Phelan and Ward 
3 Councillor Larry 
Chretien also criticized 
the use of the map saying 
Quincy's crime rate is 
relatively low for a city of 
its size and proximity to a 



major city. 

"I looked at the map 
and was surprised," 
Cheney said. "In a city of 
88,000 I thought there 
would be a lot more 
crime." 

The Quincy Sun 
frequently publishes a Ust 
of police log "Hot Spots" 
which provide the 
disposition of incidents 
and other details. 

The Sun also publishes 
a "Crime Watch" column 
by Robert Hanna, crime 
prevention officer of the 
Quincy Police Dept., 
which offers crime 
prevention tips. 

"STEVE KAVANAGH 



Memorial Fund Drive For 
Granite Workers Statue 



The Ward 4 

Neighborhood Association 
is conducting a Fund Drive 
to erect a statue in honor 
of the Quincy Granite 
Woikers. 

Donations should be 
sent to Alba Tocci, 
Treasurer, Quincy Ward 4 
Neighborhood Association, 
IS Rodman St., South 



Quincy, MA 02169. 
Checks should be made 
payable to The Granite 
Workers Memorial Fund. 

Meeting information 
will be scheduled 
beginning in January. For 
more information, call 
President Ernest Aristide 
at 472-6312. 



Johnson, Cahill In Opposition 

Sheets Forming Task 

Force To Create Quincy 

College Board Of Trustees 



Mayor James Sheets is 
initiating a five-member 
task force to create a new 
governance board for 
Quincy College. 

However, Quincy 
College President O. 
Clayton Johnson and City 
Councillor-at-Large 
Timothy Cahill are both 
opposed to the creation of 
a task force. 

Johnson said last week 
that the task force amounts 
to "stall tacfics" by the 
mayor on the issue. 

Cahill said the 
governance change should 
be handled through the 
City Council's Education 
Committee. 

"We are the best forum 
because we've been 
outside the realm of the 
bickering," said Cahill, 
referring to numerous 
disagreements between 
Johnson and the School 
Committee in recent years. 

Sheets' task force would 
include two School 
Committee and two City 
Council members and 
would be chaired by the 
mayor's administrative 
assistant Bemice Mader. 

Sheets has asked 
Council President Charles 
Phelan to appoint Cahill 
and Ward 4 Councillor 
Thomas Fabrizio to the 
task force. Fabrizio is 



chairman of the council's 
Education Committee. 

Steve Durkin, vice 
chairman of the School 
Committee said Sheets 
has asked him to appoint 
two members. Durkin said 
he has selected Linda 
Stice and has narrowed 
down the second choice to 
either Dan Raymondi, Peg 
King or himself. He said 
he would probably make 
the second selection by 
today (Thursday). 

Cahill proposed a home 
rule petition to the council 
in October calling for a 
Board of Trustees to 
govern the college instead 
of the School Committee. 

"I brought this (to the 
council) on my own... not 
for someone else (current 
Board of Trustees). We 
need to do something 
before the college is 
seriously damaged," Cahill 
said. 

The mayor's task force 
would also include eight 
non-voting members 
including, Johnson; 
Superintendent of Schools 
Eugene Creedon; Steve 
McGrath, city solicitor; 
Tom Walsh, president of 
the Quincy Education 
Association; a student 
government representative; 
a member of either the 
College Board of Trustees 
or College Courses 



Incorporated; and two 
members of a community 
college association or 
related organization or 
organizations that are 
expert in college 
governance. 

The two community 
college members would be 
paid consultants. 

Cahill said meetings of 
the council's Education' 
Committee would be open 
to everyone. 

"We want input from 
the public. We meet at 
night in an open forum 
when residents can attend. 
Not during the day behind 
closed doors," Cahill said. 

Sheets has 

recommended that at least 
one public hearing be held 
on the issue. 

The mayor wants all 
city departments to 
identify and way in which 
they interact with the 
college so that any factors 
may in transferring control 
of the college may be 
worked out. 

The mayor will order 
the task force to make a 
recommendation by April 
1. His plan also calls for 
the City Council, School 
Committee and mayor 
himself to act on the 
proposal by May 1 and 
that a home rule petition 
be prepared by May 15. 

-STEVE KAVANAGH 



Council Creates City*s 

First Human 

Rights Committee 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

"We are making history 
tonight," said City 
Councillor Michael 
Cheney after the council 
voted to create the city's 
first Human Rights 
Commission. 

The council voted 7-1, 
with Timothy Cahill 
dissenting, to estabUsh the 
commission which will 
consist of appointees by 
Mayor James Sheets. 

Cheney, who first 
proposed the commission 
last year, said Quincy's 
image regarding human 
rights has come full circle. 

"Just a short time ago 



we (Quincy) were 
criticized," Cheney said 
referring to comments in 
the early 1980s by Alex 
Rodriguez, then director of 
the Massachusetts 
Commission Against 
Discrimination, that 
Quincy was "the most 
racist city in America." 

Cahill said the city has 
an excellent record in the 
area of human rights and 
questioned the need for a 
commission. 

"I question whether it's 
necessary. It is the role of 
ward councillors, 
councillors-at-large and 
community activists to 



help solve neighborhood 
problems," Cahill said. 
"Sometimes we can create 
more of a problem by 
creating a commission like 
this." 

Cahill said he is 
worried people will use the 
Commission as a "crutch 
to get ahead" by making 
unfounded charges of 
racism. 

Prior to the vote the 
council amended the 
Human Rights 

Commission ordinance to 
limit membership on the 
commission to Quincy 
residents only. 



License Board Briefs 



The Quincy License 
Board took the following 
action at its meeting 
Tuesday: 

•Granted a request fi^om 
Quincy Teen Mothers, 
Bethany Congregational 
Church for a permit to 
solicit charitable funds 
using the Wishing Well 
Friday through Sunday, 



Oa. 1-3. 

•Granted a request from 
the North Quincy High 
School Cheerleaders 
(Elizabeth Ballum) for a 
permit to conduct a 
Canning Drive Thursday 
through Saturday, March 
25-27. 

•Granted a request from 

G.J. Coddington's, 1250 

jncock St. (George 



Cook) for an extension of 
their premises license into 
the Atrium for a function 
Saturday, Jan. 23. 

•Granted a request from 
the North Quincy High 
School Giris Basketball 
Team for a permit to 
conduct a Canning Drive 
Friday through Sunday, 
Jan. 15-17. 



Thursday, January 14> 1993 Quincy Sun Page 3 



North Quincy Firm Would Relocate Here Or Nearby 

Super Stop & Shop Planned At Pneumatic Scale 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

Stop & Shop Co. plans 
to build a Super Stop & 
Shop at the 10-acre 
Pneumatic Scale site, 65 
Newport Ave. 

Stop & Shop would 
close the supermarket at 
141 Newport Ave. once the 
new store is completed. 

Meanwhile, Pneumatic 
Scale Corporation is 
seeking to relocate in 
Quincy, possibly to the 
Jordan Marsh warehouse 
site in Squantum or the 
Boston Gear site in North 
Quincy. 

A spokesman for 
Pneumatic Scale, James 
Lawson, said the 
company's first priority is 
to relocate in Quincy. 
Lawson said be met with 
Mayor James Sheets last 
week to discuss relocation 
sites. 

"We are going to look 
within the city but at other 
locations as well," Lawson 
said. "The mayor would 
like to keep us." 

Pneumatic Scale 
employs 335 full-time 
workers including 52 from 
Quincy. The property is 
split by Holbrook Road 
with a parking lot to the 
north and the plant and 
offices to the south. 

Stop & Shop 
spokesman Terry 
Vandewater said that the 
current, 46,000 sq. ft.. Stop 
& Shop at Hobart St. and 
Newport Ave., would be 
converted into retail use. 

"We will put in some 
type of complimentary 
retail... something that 
would fit in well with the 
rest of the area," 
Vandewater said. "We will 
woik very closely with the 
neighbors." 

The new supermarket 



would be 74,000 sq. ft. and 
would have at least 400 
parking spaces compared 
to 220 at the present store. 
"Parking was really an 
issue, we're cramped at 
the present location," 
Vandewater said. 

Other features of a 
"Super Store" would 
include expanded product 
lines and expanded in- 
store service departments 
such as bakery, seafood 
and pharmac y , 

Vandewater said. 

Ward 3 City Councillor 
Larry Chretien said he 
wants to be satisfied on 
three points before he 
supports the project: 

•details of the new 
supermarket. 

•relocation plans of 
Pneumatic Scale. 

•plans for use of the 
current Stop & Shop store. 
"The neighbors will 
have input," said Chretien. 
"We have to look at what 
a new store would 
generate in terms of 
traffic." 

The City Council voted 
Monday to amend a 
zoning ordinance to 
designate the council as 
"special permit granting 
authority" for certain 
projects which require a 
special permit. Converting 
Pneumatic Scale or 
Boston Gear into a 
supermarket or retail 
facility would fall under 
this category. 

Ward 6 Councillor 
Bruce Ayers said he has 
contacted Pneumatic 
Scale and has offered to 
be a liason with Jordan 
Marsh. The size of the 
Jordan Marsh warehouse 
site, 1.3 million sq. ft., has 
made it difficult to market. 
William Zielinski of 



Meredith & Grew, the 
Boston firm marketing the 
Jordan Marsh property, 
denied that Pneumatic 
Scale was negotiating for 
the site. 

"I've never heard 
anything about that," 
Zielinski said. "We'll only 
make an announcement 
when a deal has been 
completed." 

Pneumatic Scale's 
James Lawson said his 
company needs 300,000 
sq. ft. of combined 
manufacturing and office 
space. Lawson said his 
company would prefer to 
move to a single floor, 
more modem layout. 

Quincy Building 
Inspector Matt Mulvey 
said the zoning of the 
Jordan Marsh site could be 
changed to allow both 
light industrial use by 
Pneumatic Scale and 
retail use by others. 

Pneumatic Scale has 
been at its present site on 
Newport Ave. for 95 years. 
The St. Louis-based 
company manufactures 
high-speed bottling and 
packaging equipment. 

"We are not under 
pressure to move right 
away," Lawson said. He 
added that under terms of 
the agreement with Stop & 
Shop, Pneumatic Scale 
has up to 4 1/2 years to 
move. 

Ward 5 Councillor 
Charles Phelan said 
Pneumatic Scale has been 
a good neighbor and he 
would welcome them to 

(Cont'd on Page J2) 



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Fine Handcrafts 

pseann'6 .. §f ^, ,^ ■ 

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Thank You for makifig our holiday season so successful. 
All of our crafters look forward to serving you in 1993. 

New Hours 



Mon & Fri 
Wed & Thurs 
Sat 
Sun 



10:00-5:30 
10:00-7:00 
10:00-4:00 

12:00-4:00 



Certified Alexander Instructor Elizabeth Mulkerin will be giving a 

free demonstration on the "Wet on Wet" oil technique on 

Wednesday, January 27 from 6:30 - 7:30 pm. Door prize. 

Please call if interested 773-4353 

1089 Hancock Street, Quincy Center (across from Woodward School) 




PNEUMATIC SCALE CORP., a fixture in North Quincy for 95 years, has agreed to seU 
Its property at Newport Ave. aud Holbrook Road, to Stop & Shop which plans to build a 
"Super store" at the site. r i- f 

'. — .^ (Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



Montilio Bakery 



Building To Be Demolished 

The Montilio's Bakery headquarters for the The owners of the 

building, 29 Chestnut St., famous Montilio's Bakery building. South Shore 

is slated for demolition as chain for many years. The Bank, will level the 

early as this week. property was sold at structure and expand its 



The building served as auction last year. 



parking area. 



.JSs.- — ' 




Ddaafe 

NEW ENGLAND 



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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 14, 1993 



€%ix±zxosr 



^^ 






USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co Inc 

1372 Hancock St Quincy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworlh Jr . Publisher 
Robert H Bosworlh. Editor 

30* p«r copy. $12.00 p«r y«ar by mail in Quincy 
$14.00 par yaar by mall outalda Quincy. $17.00 out of state 

Telephone 471-31Q0 471-3101 <i7i-3i02 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun. 1372 Hancock SI Quincy. Mass 02169 



The Ouip ¥ Sun atsumas nc tinancial responsit.iity lor 
typographiL., errors m idvertisemenu but wdl repnni that 
part ol an actverrsetr'eni m which the typographical error 
occurs 



'A^- 



Support Groups 
At Quincy Hospital 



The following support 
groups meet at Quincy 
Hospital on a regular basis. 
For information about any 
of the following programs, 
please call the phone 
number listed after the 
program. 

Alcoholics Anon- 
ymous: Groups that focus 
on the "12 Steps" and 
discussion groups. 
Wednesday, 7:30 to 9 
p.m., Conference Room A. 
Friday, 8 to 9:30 p.m.. 
Education Center, 426- 
9444 or 847-3841. 

Al-Anon: Deals with 
the issues of family 
members of alcoholics. 
Saturday, 10 a.m. to noon 
and 4 to 6 p.m. and 8 to 10 
p.m. Sunday, 8 p.m. to 9:30 
p.m.. Conference Room B 
& C, 843-5300. 

Bettors Anonymous: 
For people who have 
difficulty controlling their 
desire to gamble. Friday, 
8:30 to 10 p.m.. Education 
Center, 988-9561. 

Chronic Fatigue and 
Immune Dysfunction 
Syndrome Assn.: One 
Sunday a month, 2 to 4 
p.m.. Conference Room D, 
472-4498. 

Debtors Anonymous: 
A support group for people 
who need to control their 
spending habits. 



Wednesday, 7 to 9 p.m.. 
Conference Room D, 773- 
9981. 

Emotions Anonymous: 
Self-help group in which 
participants can share their 
personal experiences and 
learn to either solve their 
individual problems or live 
peacefully with uiu-esolved 
issues and their emotions. 
Sunday, 3 to 4:30 p.m.. 

Conference Room A, 479- 
4002. 

Manic Depressive 
Group: Discusses issues 
for people with a manic 
depressive disorder or 
depression. Second and 
fourth Thursday, 7 to 9 
p.m., Conference Room A, 
773-7440. 

Overeaters Anon- 
ymous: 12-step program to 
help people with a 
compulsive eating 
addiction Tuesday, 7 to 9 
p.m.; Sunday, 7 to 8:30 
p.m., Conference Room D, 
641-2303. 

Smokers Anonymous: 

Monday and Friday, 5:45 
to 7 p.m., Conference 
Room D, 472-5628. 

United People in Pain: 
A support group for people 
with chronic pain. 
Alternate Tuesdays, 7 
p.m.. Conference Room A, 
471-1733. 



^ Medically 
^ Speaking 

byMkhaelM. Bakerman, M.D., FA.C.C 




TAKING CONTROL OF ENDOMETRIOSIS 



Many women go 
through life believing that 
severe pain is just a 
normal part of the 
menstrual period, not 
realizing they may be 
suffering from a very real 
disorder: endometriosis. 
When the mucous 
membrane that lines the 
uterus grows in other parts 
of the body, endometriosis 
occurs. The errant tissue 
builds up each month, 
breaks down and causes 
bleeding, just as normal 
uterine tissue does. 
However, when this cycle 
takes place outside of the 
uterus, the result is 
internal bleeding, 
degeneration of the cast 
off blood and tissue, 
inflammation of surround- 
ing areas, and scarring. 
While there is no cure for 
endometriosis, treatment 
can slow the condition 
down, alleviate pain, and 
protect or restore fertility. 



P. 8. Endometriosis 
afflicts one out of ten 
women of childbearing 
years. 

If you experience 
severe pain each month 
during your period, consult 
your physician just to rule 
out the possibility of 
endometriosis. If you 
would like to learn more 
about this topic, or about 
how you can help prevent 
heart disease, call 
COMPREHENSIVE CAR- 
DIAC CARE at 472-2550. 
We are dedicated to the 
compassionate arxj caring 
practice of medicine. 
When treating patients, I 
always try to consider how 
I woukJ like myself, my wife 
and chikJren or my parents 
to be treated by a doctor. 
Office hours are by 
appointment at 101 Adams 
St., Suite 24 in Quincy. I 
am affiliated with Quincy 
Hospital and South Shore 
Hospitals. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Shades Of 1959? 




The two headlines on Page One in last week's 
Quincy Sun sounded like what could be the 
opening gun in this year's mayoral election: 
Sheets Declares City 
'Economically Sound* 
And, below it: 

Cahill: 'We're Not Out 
OfThe Woods Yet' 
Councillor Tim Cahill has been giving "serious 
consideration" to challenging Mayor 
James Sheets who will be seeking a 
third term this fall. 

Was his "We're Not Out Of The 
Woods Yet" the opening salvo for a 
1993 run? 

Maybe. Maybe not. CAHILL 

Cahill is still in the thinking- about-it stage. He 
hasn't made up his mind yet whether to challenge 
Sheets or run for re-election as a councillor at-large. 
Cahill disagrees with Sheets as to what direction the 
city is taking. Sheets sees it as moving ahead. Cahill 
thinks it's "just floating". Not going backward. But not 
going forward either. 

But Cahill knows to take on 
Sheets this year would be an upward 
battle. On a popularity scale of 1 to 10 
Sheets has got to be at least a 9 3/4s. 
Now midway through his 
second term he has yet to get bogged 
SHEETS down in conu-oversy. He has been 
able to deal with the various city imions. He has the 
downtown area looking its best in years. The city has 
a healthy-looking image and one that projects "things 
are going to get better." 

Frankly, most political observers think Sheets is 
unbeatable this year. Two years from now may be a 
different story. But this year, they don't think anyone 
short of George Washington could beat him. And, this 
year George might have a problem. 

Cahill points to another George - last name Bush - 
- who was thought to be unbeatable and a re-election 
shoo-in not too long ago but becomes a former Presi- 
dent Jan. 20. 

Cahill no doubt would be a formidable challenger. 
He topped the coimcil at-large field the last two elec- 
tions. A lot of people like the way he speaks out on 
issues even though they might not always agree with 
him. 

But Cahill has a concem he has to look straight in the 
eye before getting into a mayoral race this year. As a 




McINTYRE 




working businessman (owner Handshakes Restaurant) 
will he have the important needed time to conduct a 
long, hard, all-out campaign? 

And that may be the deciding factor as to whether he 
runs for mayor or not. 

If Cahill doesn't challenge Sheets, it is doubtful 
anyone else will. Unless a token opponent gets in just 
to see his name in the newspapers. 

Sheets could very well be the first mayor in Quincy 's 
history to run twice for re-election unopposed. Three 
mayors have done it once: Thomas Burgin (1940), 
Francis McCauley (1983) and Sheets himself in 1992. 
And speaking of Quincy's history, perhaps Cahill 
should take a look at 1959. 

That year a young (29) popular c ity 
councillor by the name of James 
Mchityre decided to challenge a vet- 
eran, popular Mayor by the name of 
Amelio Delia Chiesa. 

It was a colorful, hard-hitting cam- 
paign and when the smoke cleared, 
Delia Chiesa was still mayor by a 
margin of something Hke 2,100 votes. 
Mclntyre, some thought back 
then, should have waited for a better 
time. And that did come when Delia 
Chiesa retired in 1965 and Mclntyre 
came back to swamp Joseph LaRaia 
and win the office he couldn't win six years earlier. 

Cahill is young (33) and popular. And some observ- 
ers think he should let this year go by, seek re-election 
to the city coimcil and uain his sights for mayor on 
1995. 

But there's a problem with that, too. 
By then-especially if Sheets decides to retire or 
move on to something else-Cahill could have a lot of 
company in a mayor's race. 

Councillor Michael Cheney who has taken himself 
out of mayoral contention this year, might be ready in 
1 995. School Committeeman Dan Raymond! is a strong 
possibility. Don't rule out Paul Harold. And don't 
forget Joe LaRaia. 
Stay tuned. 



Mike Bellotti will host an Appre- 
ciation Night tomorrow (Friday) 7 to 
10 p.m. at Flanagan's, Parkingway, 
for all who worked in his successful 
campaign for state representative. He 
stresses: "No Admission Price. No 
Speeches. No Politics. No Kidding!" 






DELLA 
CHIESA 




BELLOTTI 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

Now is the time to do 
something about the 
200,000 children who are 
hungry, or at risk of 
hunger, right here in 
Massachusetts. 

The legislature has just 
passed the Massachusetts 
Childhood Hunger Relief 



Reader's Forum 



Hungry Children Need Help 



Act, which invests $5.3 
million in new dollars to 
our diildren's future. 

This pragmatically 
compassionate bill brings 
together existing child 
nutrition programs, funds 
them at adequate levels, 
and makes them more 
accessible to hungry kids 
from poor families. 



In addition to reducing 
Medicaid costs, the bill is 
designed to bring extra 
federal dollars into 
Massachusetts in food aid. 

We are very proud of 
our legislative bodies for 
their action to put hungry 
children and poor famihes 
first in Massachusetts, and 
urge Governor Weld to 



demonstrate his strong 
support of child health and 
prevention programs by 
signing this bill into law 
without delay. 

Hungry children are 
waiting. 

Dr. Joseph Doolin 

Archdiocesan Director 

Catholic Charities 



Post Offices Closed On Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 



Residents are advised 
that all post offices will be 
closed and there will be no 
regular mail delivery 
Monday, Jan. 18 in 
observance of Martin 
Luther King, Jr. Day. 



Special Delivery and 
Express Mail will be 
delivered on the holiday. 
Collections will be made 
at 1 p.m. to target 
businesses open on the 
holiday in addition to a 



regular 5 p.m. coUection. 

Customers are reminded 
that 24-hour service, seven 
days a week is available 
at the Self-Service Postal 
Center located in the 
lobby of the Boston 



General Mail Facility, 25 
Dorchester Ave., Boston. 

For postal information 
during non-business hours 
customers may call the 

Postal Answer Line at 451- 
9922. 



Thanday, Janiury 14, 1993 Qulncy Sun Page 5 



New State Representative In The First Norfolk District 

Bellotti: 'I Want To Be 
In Touch With My District' 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

With the last name 
Bellotti, one might think 
the city's newest state 
representative has been a 
frequent visitor to Beacon 
HiU. 

After all, Michael 
Bellotti's father, Francis 
X. Bellotti, served as state 
attorney general from 
1963-64 and lieutenant 
governor from 1975-1986. 
Amazingly, however, 
when the younger Bellotti 
was sworn into his first 
two-year term as state 
representative in the First 
Norfolk District Jan. 6, it 
marked only his second 
visit to the House of 
Representatives Chamber. 

He first walked into the 
hallowed halls of the State 
House 18 years ago. The 
year was 1975 and the 
elder Bellotti took the oath 
of office as lieutenant 
governor. Michael 

Bellotti, and the rest of his 
family— mother Maggie 
and 1 1 sisters and brothers- 
- proudly watched from the 
House of Representatives 
gallery. 

"I remember sitting up 
there in the gallery. There 
were 12 of us and we took 
up the entire left side and I 
remember how in awe I 
was then— I was only 11 
years old." 

Eighteen years later, 
the younger Bellotti took 
his own oath of office as 
his family again watched 
proudly from the gallery. 
With his right hand raised, 
the feeling of being a state 
representative had finally 
sunk in. 

"That's when it finally 
hit me-standing there and 
getting sworn in. It was 
the first time I met a lot of 
the other state 
representatives. 

"I also realized it's my 
turn to make a difference 
now. I'm no longer 
watching from the 
gallery." 

Of course, it was much 
more than Bellotti's name 
that helped him get 
elected last fall in an 
impressive political debut. 
His fresh face, friendly 
disposition and strong 
grass-roots campaign 
keyed his victories in the 
September primary and 
November final election. 

Bellotti succeeds 
Michael Morrissey who 
held the First Norfolk seat 
16 years. Morrissey 
vacated the seat to make a 
successful bid for the state 
senate seat held by Paul 
Harold. 

Unlike other 

candidates, Bellotti did 
not run as an agent of 
change. Instead, he 
campaigned as an agent of 
public service, a basic 
political principal learned 
eariy in his life. 

"Growing up, I learned 
you can make a difference. 
I really feel in politics you 
can have a positive impact 



on people's lives. As a 
state representative, I want 
to be regarded as someone 
who is very much in touch 
with the people of his 
district and one who 
understands the problems 
they face every day. 

"I want to be known as 
a representative who has a 
common sense approach to 
government." 

Two weeks into his first 
term, Bellotti is quickly 
out of the blocks. He has 
filed or co-sponsored 
nearly a dozen bills, most 
of which deal with the 
MWRA, a main campaign 
issue. 

Specifically, the 
MWRA's bill are aimed at 
making the authority's 
spending more 

accountable and billing 
more equitable. Filed by 
Morrissey, the bills are co- 
sponsored by Bellotti, the 
city's two other 
representatives, Steve 
Tobin and Ron Mariano, 
as well as fellow freshman 
legislator Joseph Sullivan 
of Braintrce. 

One bill would instruct 
the MWRA to bill sewer 
customers based on usage, 
not population. Because 
billing is based on 
population, Quincy was 
overcharged approximately 
$1.5 million last year. 

With a usage-based 
system, proponents say the 
city would pay a lower 
assessment to the MWRA 
which in turn would mean 
lower bills for ratepayers. 

Another MWRA-bill, 
originally filed by Harold, 
would give the authority's 
Advisory Board control 
over the budget instead of 
its Board of Directors. The 
advisory board is 
comprised mainly of 
community activists and 
officials from within the 
MWRA's district. 

"These bills would lead 
to more accountability and 
tighter spending restraints 
and in the end," Bellotti 
said, "savings for the 
ratepayer. Right now, they 
(MWRA) don't have to 
justify their own budget." 

Bellotti acknowledged 
that passage of the 
MWRA bills is a long shot 
at best, in large part 
because the South Shore 
contingent is heavily 
outnumbered by non- 
MWRA district 

representatives. In the 
past, any effort to spread 
the burden of the Boston 
Harbor cleanup outside the 
MWRA's 43 communities 
has been thwarted by 
officials outside the 
district. 

But, with a new session 
underway and 29 other 
new faces on Beacon Hill, 
Bellotti remains upbeat 
and optimistic. 

"I'm going to do my 
best to work on these bills 
because this (the MWRA) 
was the most prominent 
issue in the campaign. 




STATE REPRESENTATIVE Michael BeUottI, Qulncy's 
freshman legislator, meets with House Speaker Charles 
Flaherty (D-Everett) in the speaker's office after being 
sworn in by Gov. William Weld Jan. 6 in the House of 
Representatives Chamber. 

(Mark E. Kasianowicz photo) 

Transportation, Natural 
Resources and Health 
Care Committees. He said 
transportation is his first 
choice because of the Old 
Colony railroad restoration 
project and its impact on 
Quincy. The city is also 
home to four MBTA Red 
Line stations. 

Whatever committee he 
serves, Bellotti has clear 
expectations for his first 
legislative session. 

"I want to learn as 
much about the legislative 
process in the shortest 
amount of time possible 
and to learn even more 
about the needs of my 
district. I want to become 
focused on the best ways 
to meet those needs as a 
state representative. 

"The MWRA and jobs 
arc the biggest issues. For 
the MWRA, I want to 
bring it under control so 
that there's more 
accountability, change the 
rate billing system for 
sewerage and provide 
greater oversight of the 
Fore River pelletization 
plant." 

A lifelong Democrat, 
Bellotti said both parties 
will need to work together 
to help stimulate the 
Massachusetts economy 
and provide employment 
opportunities. 

"Even though the 
Democrats are in a 
position of power, more so 
now than before 
November, we still have to 
remember that we have to 
do whatever it takes to 
attract business and 
industry arKl that means 
working with a RepubUcan 
administration." 

As he embarks on his 
first journey in public 
office, Bellotti is heeding 
the simple advice from bis 
father "Always listen to 
peq>le and let them know 
you care about their 
problems. And, even 
though you may not be 
able to solve every 
problem, you'll try your 
hardest." 



But, it's going to be 
tough." 

Besides the MWRA, 
Bellotti has focused on 
other issues. He has filed 
a bill which would approve 
state funding to dredge the 
areas around Marina Bay 
and Squantum Yacht Qub, 
including the channel 
basin and adjacent 
mooring area. The 
dredging is performed 
periodically for improved 
accessibility, navigation 
aiKi pubUc safety. 

He's also co-sponsored 
a bill filed by Morrissey 
aimed at punishing anyone 
who knowingly and 
willfully obstructs, resists 
or interferes with a police 
officer, firefighter or any 
other pubUc safety official 
performing his or her duty. 
If approved, the legislation 
would place convicted 
offenders behind bars for 
up to one year or fine them 
$100 to $250. 

"We must protect our 
public safety officials. 
They're out there fighting 
for us on the front lines. 
We must have laws to 
protect them," the 
freshman legislator said. 

Bellotti, who is single, 
will celebrate his 30th 
birthday March 21. A 
former manufacturing 
representative who co- 
owns a wholesale produce 
company with his brother, 
Tom, Mike Bellotti 
decided to make his first 
run for office last year. 

"I'm 29 years old and I 
know first hand bow 
politics takes its toll on 
families. This was the 
right time and age for me 
to nin." 

Bellotti is one of 30 
state reps comprising the 
1992 legislative freshman 
class. With 160 

representatives, almost 19 
percent arc new faces. 

As for committee 
assignments, Bellotti has 
asked House Speaker 
Charles Flaherty to be 
placed on the 



Quincy 's 
Yesterdays 

Parking Hinted 
On Library Lawn 

Colleagues on the City Council looked askance at a 
proposal by Councillor David J. Crowley to construct a 
parking arca for 150 cars on the lawn of the Thomas Crane 
Public Library. 

Councillor Carl W. Anderson, who usually voted with 
Crowley in what had become ■--«-------------------------• 



known as the Anderson- 
Crowley Axis, announced his 
strong opposition to destroy- 
ing one of the few "beauty 
spots" in the Qty. 



Jan. 14*20 

1952 

41 Years Ago 



"To profane this beautiful 

building by turning its spacious lawn into a parking lot 

would be a serious error," said Councillor Edna B. Austin. 

Crowley noted that the "cold-blooded" Council did not 
hesitate to destroy "the birthplaces and heaithstooes of 
Quincy citizens" for parking and "human beings deserve 
morc consideration than a lawn." 

The Council voted to send Crowley's ^mposil to Gty 
SoUcitor Arthur I. Burgess, who gave a prcliminaiy opinion 
that the city could take the lawn but Ubrary trustees also 
could sue for damages. 

CAR IN QUARRY 

Quincy poUce could find no evidence of foul play in a 
1950 sedan with a bullet bole in the roof which was found in 
New Fallon's Quarry, West Quincy, less than an hour after 
it was reported stolen in South Boston. 

Capt. William Ferrazzi said investigation disclosed that 
the radio and lock were missing from the car indicating that 
robbery was a motive for its theft and abandonment in the 
water-filled quarry.. 

It was discovercd at 1 :30 am by Patrolmen Gorden Parry 
and John Malvesti, who also found two empty but still warm 
shells from a German luger pistol a short distance away on 
quarry St. 

QUINCY-KMS 

Sea Charies W. Hedges urged that 18-year-olds be per- 
mitted to vote since if they were old enough to fight "as they 
arc doing in Korea, the voting franchise should be extended 
to them" ... George O. E>ixon was honored for his 30 years of 
service as treasurer of the First Church of Squantum ... Pot 
roast was 79 cents a pound at Lodgens, 32 Cottage Ave ... 
Alexander Smith, director of finance, announced that parking 
meter revenue for 1951 totalled $87,795 and operating 
ejqwnses $21,550 ... Mrs. Cari F. Hammerle, 77 Teme Rd., 
Adams Shore, was ajqKnnted civil defense chairman of the 
Quincy Federation of Women's Organizations ... "Golden 
Girl," starring Mitzi Gaynor and Dale Robertson, and "Silver 
City," with Yvonne DeCarlo and Edmond O'Brien, were 
playing at the Ait Theater ... Mayor David S. Mcintosh was 
the principle speaker at the annual installation of ofGcers in 
the Quincy Firefighters Association at the Winfield House ... 
Marine Pfc Joseph F. Duffy, son of Patrolman and Mrs. T. 
Joseph Duffy, 25 Dale Ave., South Quincy, was serving 
aboard the aircraft carrier USS Midway ... The Sdiool 
Committee viewed four sites in the Adams St.-Fumace 
Brook Parkway area under consideration for a proposed 
elementary school to serve the Cranch Hill-WoUaston area ... 
A 1947 Crosley was $189 at Bargainville, 540 Southern 
Artery ... J. Everett Robbie was re-elected clerk of the 
corporation of the Quincy Trust Co ... The Rev. ComeUus J. 
Donovan was the honorary chairman of a committee plan- 
ning the observance of the 1 10th anniversary of St Mary's 
Church ... The stars of the Savoy, Storyville and Eddie 
Condon 's played in a Dixieland jazz concert at the Sea Shell 
Grille, 105 Sea St, Merrymount ... Councillor David J. 
Crowley was named by Mayor Mcintosh to chairtheCoundl's 
Hnance Conmiittee ... Yardarm Lane, Taffrail Rd. aiKl 
Quadrant Circle were accepted as city streets by the Qty 
Council ... Louis J. Sordillo was installed as commandant of 
the Caddy Detachment, marine Cmps League ... Charies 
Francis Adams, 85, former mayw of Quincy, was conva- 
lescing from a serious illness in Washington ... George A. 
Daley Jr., president of the Quincy Chamber of Commerce, 
was named chairman of the committee that was planning a 
testimonial dinnerforbanker-philaotlm^nstDelcavareKing. 



Page 6 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 14, 1993 




Marie's 
Kitchen 

By MARIE J. D'OLBVIPIO 



Jed's Shrimp Creation 



Since our daughter Nancy's woiking 
hours are much later than her new 
husband's, Jed sometimes surprises her 
by making dinner for the both of tbem. 
And so it was recently when she called 
raving over his new invented recipe. 

The next day, she brought us over a 
taste and naturally when we tried it I 
thought immediately of all of you so here 
it is. 

JED'S SHRIMP CREATION 

1 to 1/2 pound of shrimp 

1 small jar of marinated artichoke 
hearts 

3/4 cup vermouth cooking wine 

2 fresh tomatoes (sliced) 

1 medium onion (chopped) 

4 or 5 cloves of garlic (finely 



chopped) 

2 or 3 slices of lemon (minus the 
rinds) 

4 tablespoons olive oil 

3 tablespoons butter or margarine 
salt, pepper, basil and oregano 
grated Parmesan cheese 

In a large skilled skillet, saute the 
onions, garlic with the seasonings. Add 
the lemon with the vermouth and stir for 
a minute or so. Then stir in the shrimp. 
While waiting for them to turn pink, add 
the tomatoes, artichoke hearts and then 
lastly the mushrooms. Simmer until the 
mushrooms are cooked. 

Serve with grated cheese and Italian 
crusty bread (to soak up the juices) Jed 
says! Serves 2 to 4. 



3 Residents To Be Honored Tonight 
At YMCA Black Achievers Banquet 



Three Quincy residents 
will be recognized tonight 
by their employers and the 

YMCA Black Achievers 
Branch for outstanding 
contributions to the 
workplace and 

commitment to community 
service. 



They are: Carl Harris, 
Liberty Mutual Insurance 
Company; Terrel Harris, 
WLVI-TV Channel 56; and 
Faye Howard, Shawmut 
Bank, N.A. 

The Awards Dinner is 
being held at the Boston 
Marriott Copley Place. 



Award recipients agreed to 
volunteer more than 40 
hours of community 
service to youth serving as 
role models, mentors, and 
tutors. 

For more information 
call the YMCA Black 
Achievers Branch at 536- 
7800 ext. 329. 



Tamilies First' Parenting Series 
At Quincy Hospital 



Quincy Hospital will 
present "Families First," a 
series of three programs 
about parenting, during 
January and February. 

The program, created 
by child development 
professionals at Wheelock 
College, will be presented 
on consecutive Thursdays, 
Jan. 21, 28 and Feb. 4 at 7 
p.m. at the Quincy 
Hospital Education Center. 

"Things Kids Do That 
Drive Us Nuts: 



Understanding Motivation 
and Behavior" will be 
presented Jan. 21. 

"I Can Do It Myself: 
Fostering Independence 
and Responsibility" will be 
presented Jar. 28. 

"To Yell or Not To 



Hospital Boards Meetings Jan. 19 

The Quincy Hospital The Board of Managers 

will meet at 7:30 p.m. 

The meeting will be in 
the Education Center- 
McCauley Building. 



Board of Managers 
Finance Committee will 
meet Tuesday, Jan. 19 at 
6:30 p.m. 




SANTA CLAUS greeted many folks, including Re Golden of Quincy, during Quincy 
Hospital's recent Holiday Party for Seniors. The party featured line dancing, blood 
pressure screening and nutritional and pharmaceutical advice. 



Asian New Year Celebration 
Sunday At NQHS 



The Committee for 
Immigrants and Refugees, 
Inc. and the Quincy 
American Asian 

Association will hold their 
fifth annual Asian New 

Year Celebration Sunday 
from 5 to 9 p.m. at North 
Quincy High School, 316 
Hancock St. 

Songs and dances from 



Asian cultures will be 
featured and a banquet 
dinner will be served. 

Tickets are available at 
the following locations: 

•North Quincy Library 
(376-1322): Friday 
morning. 

•South Shore YMCA, 
Quincy Center (479-8500): 
Thursday morning (today). 

•Urbanistics, Quincy 



Center (328-9211): Friday 
afternoon. 

•Fenno House, 
Wollaston (773-5483): 
Wednesday (yesterday) 
through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 
pjn. 

Tickets are $10 for 
adults, $7 for children. All 
members of the 
community are welcome. 



QHS 1943 Class Reunion Oct. 23 



Quincy High School 
Qass of 1943 wiU hold its 
50th anniversary reunion 
Saturday, Oct. 23 at 
Lantana in Randolph. 



Current addresses and 
phone numbers of 
classmates are needed. 
Call or write Marion 
(Forsberg) Bell, 31 Reed 



St., Milton, MA 02186 
(698-6451) or Eleanor 
(DiTullio) Giacomozzi, 
102 Bower Rd., Braintree, 
MA 02184 (843-0766). 



Yell: Constructive Ways 
of Expressing Anger" will 
be presented Feb. 4. 

Cost is $5 per person, 
per session. Advance 
registration is required. To 
register call 773-6100, ext. 
4016. 



Michael Anderson Scholarship Recipient 



Michael T. Anderson, 
son of Qyde L. Anderson 
of Bowes Ave., Quincy, 
has been selected as a 
recipient of the Roanoke 
College Scholarship. 

Anderson was graduated 
from Quincy High School 
and is majoring in biology 
at Roanoke College, 
Salem, Va. 

Roanoke College 
Scholarships are awarded 



to outstanding full-time 
students in recognition of 



superior 
performance. 



academic 



La Leche League 
Meeting Jan. 18 




La Leche League will 
meet Monday, Jan. 18 at 
7:30 p.m. Expectant and 
breastfeeding mothers with 
their babies are welcome. 

The group meets the 
third Monday of each 
month. Discussions are 



related to breastfeeding, 
parenting, and infant/child 
nutrition. A lending library 
of parenting and 
breastfeeding books is 
available. 

For directions or more 
information call 328-8192 
or 472-4086. 



RECEPTION HALLS 



1120-SEATEF 
D6C0VERBINEAR 
MARMABAY. 
THOUGHT TO BE 

The s«Dct'5 out 

function room at Amelia $ 

has becxxne one d Boston's 

most popular spots for uied- 

dings, shouiers, corporate 

meetings, and gettogethcn 

of aU kinds. Vk feature an 

extensive menu at affordable 

prices. VUe ouelook Marina 

Bay and the Boston skyline 

We'd like to make your next 

functxsn really fly 

I Please caD 6174711453. 



I 




FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



MUSIC 



LIVE MUSIC 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Art Perry, His Saxophone 

and Orchestra 

Featuring 

Music of the 30s and 40s 

843-7878 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



TRAVEL 



HONEYMOON 

IN ROMANTIC SCOTLAND 

If Castle or Cottage IT 

Scottish Connections 

304 Victory Rd., Marina Bay 

fi17-77(M172 2/4 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography , 

679 Hancock Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6888 



Quincy 

Choral Society 

Ctiamber Chorus 

479-2061 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



Our Policy On 

Engagement Photographs 

And Wedding Announcements 



The Qttincy Stttt will continiie WplibilSh'plfejt'' 
tograi^ with engagemcm aimouncemeiits z& it 
always MSx 

The Stiti wj^ iSm cosiii&ttc to use in wedding 
attuouncement&jHie aaiaes of all mejnb»s of tlie 
wedding patty iactudui^ maid or amtron oflKHior^ 
Ijest ma% pareiits, biidesmaids^ tuduxs^ ftower 
girls and liB^bearens^ etc* '\, <-l^^^ 

We invite eo^ged couples to snlmat (}i<^ 
ptiotos witii tiieir amwuscementtLflpd wben s«lh 
wM&% dieir weddingplioto to indltKie acontplete. 
ijstiag of ll)e we4^g patty. 

Black aMwldfe|}hoto$ mt piteSmtL Tt^eStOE 
can convert most color photos to black and vMii^ 



JEWELRY 



Poison nn«J«««"y 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family Al - Dave - Mark' 
730 HANCXXa< ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 



d}e|»rc)C«ss. 

We suggest thai whm you luve yim tngiig^ 
ment phcHbo taken, yon reqt^t tiie stittlio to 9etMl * 
ropy toTheSott with the reminder that Tlie Sunl» 
continuing it^ policy of {mbliii^tdiig engagem^ot 
phtHos. 

The $im also pabiishes article and photos of 

And, d$ jt^ il^j«8t, HiimU m<Mt$s^- 




Social 



HAPPY BIRTHDAY-Frances DiRamio, seated, of 
Wollaston, recently celebrated her 90th birthday with 
friends and family members including, from left, sons 
and daughters, Eugene DiRamio, Grace Fitzgerald, 
Frances Salvatori and Edward DiRamio. 

Frances DiRamio 
Celebrates 90th Birthday 



Frances DiRamio, a 
resident of the Fenno 
House, Wollaston, 
recently celebrated her 
90th birthday and was 
feted with a catered, 
Italian Style, five-course 
dinner at the Fenno House. 

Helping to celebrate 
were her children, 
grandchildren, great- 
grandchildren, family and 
friends. 

DiRamio has lived in 
Quincy for about 55 years. 
She is the mother of six 
children including her 
sons: 

Alphonso DiRamio, a 
postal carrier in Quincy for 
more than 30 years; 
Carmine DiRamio, a 
Quincy police officer for 
more than 40 years; 
Edward DiRamio, a Major 
League Baseball scout in 
the New England area for 
19 years; and Eugene 
DiRamio, a lieutenant on 
the Quincy Fire 
Department, with more 
than 25 years of service. 



She is also the mother 
of two daughters, Frances 
Salvatori of Quincy, and 
Grace Fitzgerald of 
Bedford, a retired Civil 
Servant with more than 30 
years of service and 
currently employed at 
Raytheon Service Co., 
Burlington. Fitzgerald is 
president of Tewksbury- 
Wilmington Emblem Club 
#381, and press 
correspondent and member 
of the Resource 
Committee for AMI of 
Central Middlesex. 

In addition to six 
children, Mrs. DiRamio 
had 14 grandchildren (one 
is deceased), aiKl 20 great- 
grandchildren, most who 
reside in the Quincy area. 

She is the wife of the 
late Concezio Ross 
DiRamio, an Honorary 
Life Member of the 
Quincy Lodge of Elks and 
noted Hair Stylist of 
Helena Rubenstein, 
Boston. 



MR. and MRS. 



JAMES McCarthy 

(Photo by Image Mart) 



Ann Woodman Wed 
To James McCarthy 



Ann Woodman, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Woodman of 
Quincy, was recently 
married to James 
McCarthy, son of Mrs. 
Carol McCarthy of Quincv. 

A candlelight nuptial 
Mass was conducted at St. 
Aim's Church, Wollaston, 
and officiated by the Rev. 
Jack Ahem. A reception 
followed at South Shore 
Country Qub, Hingham. 

Denise Moss of New 
Britain, Coim., served as 
Matron of Honor for her 
sister. 



New Year's Son 
For Mr., Mrs. John Hurley 

Mr. and Mrs. John and Mrs. Don Burke of Squantum; 



Hurley of Quincy are 
parents of a son, Brendan 
Michael, bom Jan. 1 at 
Quincy Hospital, first bom 
of the new year 1993. 

Mrs. Hurley is the 
former Darlene Burke. 

Grandparents are Mr. 



Quincy and Mr. and Mrs. 
Dave Hurley of Pembroke. 
Great- grandparents are 
Mr. and Mrs. William 
Shaw and Mrs. and Mrs. 
Nancy Burke, all of 
Quincy, and Mrs. Helen 
Hurley of Pembroke. 



Mr., Mrs. Charles Kane 
Parents Of Son 

and Mrs. Charles Woburn 



Bridesmaids included 
Mary Ellen Dolan of 
Dorchester, cousin of the 
bride; Susan Hegarty of 
Ann Marie 
McCarthy of Hyde Park, 
sister of the groom; and 
Sandy Woodman of 
Revere, cousin of the 
bride. 

Joseph McCarthy of 
Quincy served as Best 
Man for his brother. 

Ushers included George 



Woodman and Robert 
Woodman, both of Quincy, 
brothers of the bride; John 
McCarthy of Hyde Park, 
brother of the groom; Maik 
Wilkins of Ft. Myers, Fla.; 
Richard Wilkins of 
Randolph; Thomas 
CMalley of Norwood; and 
John Goslin, Kevin Enos 
and Eric Peterson, all of 
Quincy. 

The bride is a graduate 
of UMass-Boston and is 
employed in ^account 
receivable at Brewster 
Wallcovering. 

The groom is a graduate 
of UMass-Boston and is 
employed as an 
accountant with 

Dorchester Mutual 
Insurance Co. 

Following a wedding 
trip to Bermuda the couple 
are residing in Quincy. 



JIMMY JAY MUSIC 



Guaranteed Lowest 

Prices on Cassettes, 

CDs and Records 



690 HANCOCK ST. 
WOLLASTON 479-7080 



Thursday, January 14, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 7 

Dorothy Serrilla Engaged 
To Henry Williamson 




Mrs. Carol Serrilla of 
Wollaston announces the 
engagement of her 
daughter, Dorothy, to 
Henry T. Williamson. He 
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Williamson of 
Scotchtown, Nova Scotia, 
Canada. 

Miss Serrilla is a 1984 
graduate of North Quincy 
High School and a 1987 



graduate of Quincy Junior 
College. She is employed 
at Massachusetts General 
Hospital. 

Mr. Williamson is a 

1981 graduate of Breton 

Education Center. He is 

serving in the Canadian 

Navy. 

A July 17 wedding is 
plaimed. 



Ebba Legaspi In 
Students' 'Who's Who' 



Ebba N. Legaspi of 
Quincy, a senior at Suffolk 
University, has been 
elected to the 1993 edition 
of "Who's Who Among 
Students in American 
Universities and 

Colleges." 

A native of the 
Philippines, she is a 
finance major at Suffolk. 
She is a member of the 
Delta Mu Delta National 
Honor Society and the 
Financial Management 
Association. 

She is also an 
executive board member 
of Suffolk's Evening 
Division Student 




EBBA LEGASPI 



Association and an 
Association and an 
international student 
mentor. She is the 
daughter of Danilo and 
Violeta Legaspi of Quincy. 



Wollaston Garden Club 
Meeting Jan. 21 



The Wollaston Garden 
Club will meet Thursday, 
Jan. 21 at noon at 
Wollaston Congregational 
Church, Winthrop Ave. 

Mrs. Margaret Dogbeity 
will present "Birds Are 
Beloved Rascals." 

Floral arrangement will 
be by Mrs. Jane Driscoll 



and hostess will be Mrs. 
Marie Norris. Prior to the 
program there will be a 
silent auction. Members 
should bring items for the 
auction. 

Members should bring a 
sandwich. Coffee, tea and 
dessert will be supplied by 
the hostess. 



Mr., Mrs. Daniel Kimera 
Parents Of Daughter 

Grandparents 



Mr. and Mrs. Daniel 
Kimera, 290 Quarry St., 
Quincy, are parents of a 
daughter, Gloria, bom Dec. 
19 at Mount Auburn 
Hospital. 



are Mr. 
and Mrs. Semakula 
Lawrence and Mr. and 

Mrs. John Kiwanuka 
Zimbe, all of Uganda. 



r 



LOVE IS ... a perfect wedding ar the 
Golden Lion Suite 

Spaak lo RHa - thc't our ranlal •«*nl 
•p.clalliing In compUl* w.dding 
Itackag* plant and all olhar occaalom 
Tha Go<d«n Lion Sullt accomodalaa up 
lo 300. Tha Vanallan Room up lo 140 
guaila. Glut Rlla a call lor an 
appotnlntanl lor your ratarvallon Naw 
brochura> ara a<allaMa 

(Air Condlllontd) 

(All 

Ouincy Sum uf Ital) Social (enter 

120 Quarry Street, (juincv. MA 02169 

MW M MBKK is 472-5»00 







Mr 

Kane, 22 Helene St., 
Quincy, are parents of a 
son, bom Dec. 1 1 at Mount 
Auburn Hospital. 

Grandparents are Mr. 
Charles M. Kane of 
Pompano Beach, Ha., Mr. 
Thomas Wheaton of 



and Mrs. Judy 
Wheaton of Cambridge. 

Great-grandparents are 
Mrs. LUa Kane of Auburn, 
Mrs. Marjorie Doherty of 
Quincy, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Wheaton of 
Hebron, N.H. 



CLASSES 

Children 
& Adults 

M.D.C. Rinks 



JLM.MAt.M.'JAlJJAIJJA!JJ.U.M.M.M .M. > . r . | .|. | .^ t , 



-r*w 




Winficld 
Gift Emporium 



• ICE SKATING 



^ Cleveland Circle 
^ Evcretl 

Hyde Park Dedham 
9 Lyrui 

• Medford Flynn 
J Medlord LoConip 

• Millon 

^ Newion Briqhion 
Oiinrv 
% SomerviW 

• Wahham 

• We« Ronbury 



AFTER CHRISTMAS 
CLEARANCE 
25-50% OFF 
Selected Items 
Hours: Tues-Sat 10:00 am-5:00 pm 
Sunday 12-5 ■ Closed Monday iH^ 
853 Hancock St, Quincy 479-9784 ^mmd 

\.lA.y_\\ ■'- Lm ^M J.l^'^lAlAlAJLAIAJLLJLIJL.I.1.1 J.J.JLJ JaLJ 







7 Lessons 
S65 child. S75 adiJi 

Starts January 

regiitralion inio 

965-4460 

BAY STATE 
SKATING SCHOOL 




i3£. 



Russell Edward's 




r5^^^^^^^#;^ 


^m ■ .,.«»#«»' ^^^H 


.4 full service hair salon 




MONDAY 

Women 's Special $20.00 


■[pH^B|k jil^pHj^^^^^^V^r^^^----',-^^, 


TUBS & THURS 

Men 's Special $1 3.00 


f^^ 


WEDNESDAY 
Perm Special 

Starting at $42.00 


1 



Nail Tipping & Overlay $60 
All specials include wash, cut and blowdry. Sculptured Nails $60 

Long hair slightly higher Pedicures $25 

Body & Facial Waxing Available 

We carry a full line of hair care products 
REDICEN KMS ^i.US gguL MtTciHELr yfnatfix 

472-1060 

^R Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts., 1 Maple St., Quincy 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 14, 1993 



Arts/Entertainment 



Quincy Symphony Orchestra 
Mid- Winter Concert Jan. 22 



The Quincy Symphony 
Orchestra will present the 
second concert of its 39th 
season Friday, Jan. 22 at 8 
p.m. in the Performing Afts 

Center at North Quincy 
High School, under the 
direction of Ann Danis, 
conductor and music 
director. 

The program will 
include "Academic 
Festival Overture" by 
Brahms, "Violin Concerto 
in G major" by Haydn, and 
Symphony No. 2, 
"Romantic" by Hanson. 
Cheri Markward will be 
the violin soloist. 



Markward is a meml 
of the Rhode Island 
Philharmonic Orchestra 
and is concertmaster of the 
Ocean State Chamber 
Orchestra. She has been 
featured soloist with 
several area orchestras aiKl 
was featured in Svendson's 
"Romance for Violin and 
Orchestra" at the Victor 
Borge concert at Great 
Woods. She is a faculty 
member of the Community 
College of Rhode Island, 
and the Great Woods 
Education Forum in the 
summer. 

Danis was appointed by 
the Board of Directors of 



the Quincy Symphony to 
be conductor and music 
director of the orchestra for 
the 1992-93 season. An 
accomplished violinist as 
well as a conductor, she is 
a graduate of the New 
England Conservatory of 
Music with a master's 
degree in performance. 
Currently, she is assistant 
professor of music at 
Wheaton College in 
Norton. 

Tickets for the concert 
are $8 for adults, $6 for 
seniors and students. For 
more information, 328- 
5347 or 925-4319. 



Quincy Center Dinner Theatre's 
•Love, Sex And The I.R.S/ Begins Jan. 23 



Darling Productions' 
Quincy Center Dinner 
Theatre, in association 
with Rural Lodge AF and 
AM, will present the 
comedy, "Love, Sex and 
the I.R.S." beginning 
Saturday, Jan. 23, at the 
Masonic Temple, 1170 
Hancock St. 

Cast members include 



Michele Proude and Larry 
LeCours of Quincy. 
Director is Dave Mansfield 
of Hanson. 

Show dates and times 
are Friday, Jan. 29 and 
Saturday, Jan. 23 and 30, 
and Feb. 6, dinner at 7:15 
p.m. and 8:45 p.m. show. 
And Sunday Jan. 24 and 
Feb. 7, dinner at 5 p.m. 



and 6:30 p.m. show. 

Cost for full course 
dinner (choice of three 
entrees) and show is 
$29.95. Buffet and show 
costs $24.95. All prices 
include tax and gratuity. 
Show only tickets are $12. 

For inform aton and 
reservations call Darling 
Productions, 843-5862. 



Beechwood Center 



Thursday, Jan. 14: 

Pre-luncheon exercise, 
11:15 a.m.; Luncheon, 
11:45 a.m., call for 

reservations and 
information; Movies, 1 
p.m., second and fourth 
Thursday of the month, 50 
cents; Alzheimer's Support 
Group, 2 and 7 p.m., third 

Save Gat and Money 
Shop Locally 



^CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 
1/14-1/21 



Thursday of the month; 
Multiple Sclerosis 
Support, 7 p.m., fourth 
Thursday of the month. 

Friday, Jan. IS: 
Walking Club (with 
Nancy) 3-mile walk, 9 
a.m.; Gentle Walk (meet 
at Beechwood), 10 a.m.; 
"Easy Does It" dance- 
exercise, 10:15 to 11 a.m.. 



six-week course (began 
Jan. 8), Gini Waterman, 
instructor; Co-ed 
volleyball, 11:15 a.m. to 
12:45 p.m., $2; Line 
Dancing, 1 to 2:30 p.m., 
$3. 

Tuesday, Jan. 19: 
Stroke Qub, 9:30 to 11:30 
a.m., first and third 
Tuesday of the month. 



SCENT OF A 
WOMAN (R) 

12:1»4:30-7K)0-1(h06 



CHAPUN(PG-13) 

12:29- 330 -7«0- 10*0 



HOFFA(R) 

1 2«). 3:29- 7*0 -»«0 
FRI& SAT ONLY 12:20 AM 



BODY OF 
EVIDENCE (R) 

11 « -2:19 -4^0- 7:29 -IMO 
FRIli SAT OW-Y 12:19 AM 

|tHE BODYGUARD (R)1 

1230 -3:40 -7«9-»a0 
FRIt SAT ONLY 12:10 AM 



IT'S TIME TO LAUGH - A LOT!! 
QUINCY DINNER THEATRE 

MASONIC BLDG - 1170 HANCOCK ST. 

South Shore's Outstanding Professional Theatre 

presents 

"LOVE, SEX, 

AND THE I.R.S." 

Six performances 
Jan 23 - 24 29 - 30 Feb 6 - 7 

Fri + Sat Full Course Dinner + Show - 29.95 
Sunday - Jan 23 - Italian Buffet + Show - 24.95 

SHOW TICKETS - 12.00 - ALL PERFORMANCES 

♦SPECIAL SENIOR DISCOUNTS - FRI + SUNDAYS 

Reservations & Information 

843-5862 




DANCE CHAMPIONS-The "Girls United" team from Lisa's Dance Studio, 77A 
Parkingway, won first place in the recent DanceAmerica competition. Team members, 
from left to right, Jennifer Skotniczny, 11, Jennifer Marshall, 11, Courtney Doyle, 11 
and Kristen Lavery, 10. 

Trumpet Recital Jan. 24 
At First Presbyterian 



Steven Emery will 
present a trumpet recital at 
Quincy's First Presbyterian 
Church, 270 Frankhn St., 
Sunday, Jan. 24 at 6:30 
pjn. 

He will be 

accompanied by his wife, 
freelance pianist Deborah 
DeWoIf Emery and oboist 
Laura Ahlbeck. 

Music by Persichetti, 
Clark and Copeland, 
among others, will be 
featured in the program. 
This is the first of four 



concerts in the church's 
"Artist Series 1993." 

Admission is free, child 
care is available and a 
reception with the 
musicians will follow in 
the church's fellowship 
hall. A free-will offering 
will be taken to further the 
concert series. The music 
is presented as a 
celebration of God's gifts 
as expressed in the 
musicians' and composers' 
talents. 

The "Artists Series" 



fifth season will also 
present a recital by BSO 
violinist Bonnie Bewick 
and Timothy Steele, 
piano, Feb. 28, and a 
concert featuring the 
Amici Quartet March 21. 
The final concert is 
entitled "Battle of the 
Bands"--a friendly 
competition between the 
sections of the orchestra 
featuring BSO musicians 
taking place on May 16. 

For more information 
call 773-5575. 



Linda Massey Has Poem Published 



Linda Massey of 
WoUaston has recently 
had original poetry 
published in "A Question 
of Balance," a collection 
of contemporary poetry 
compiled by The National 



BALLOONS & STUFF 



690 HANCOCK ST. 

WOLLASTON 

773-0690 



ASK FOR THE $29.95 
BALLOON DELIVERY 



Library of Poetry. 

Massey's poem, 
"Tonight (for Tom Brady)" 
is about reflecting on one's 
Ufe. 

The National Library of 
Poets seeks to discover 
and encourage poets like 
Massey by sponsoring 
contests that are open to 
the public and by 
publishing poems in 
widely distributed 
hardback volumes. 




*'Rockin into the 90'$" 

D.J. STEVE KAVANAGH 
Music for all Occasions 



'*Mu$ic for people who 

take their fun seriouslyP' 

773-4936 



AUVE(R) 

12:30 -3:15- 7:15-7:15-9*) 
FRI*8ATONLY 12:15 AM 




FA FEW GOOD MEN (R)] 

12:ai-3d8-7«0-««0 ' 

FRI* SAT ONLY 12:15 AM 



NOWHERE TO RUN (R) 

1 2«0-2:a»4:30-7:3»«M 
FMAMT ONLY 12:10 AM 



Bargain Matinees 
First Three Shows 



i 




uccift^^ niisterSUB 



S3.75 



773-5700 



Pizza - Pasta - Subs 

Syrians - Salads 

Dine In or Carry Out, or Delivered 



62-64 Billings Road, No. Quincy, MA 02171 
Hot Line 328-9764 • 328-0266 FAX 786-9792 




Massey, of 67 Old 
Colony Ave., has been 
writing for 14 years. 

Poets interested in 
publication may send one 
original poem, any subject 
or style, 20 lines or less, to 

The National Library of 
Poetry, 11419 Cronridge 
Dr. #10, P.O. Box 704NR, 
Owings Mills, Md., 21 117. 
All poems received are 
also entered in The 
National Library of 
Poetry's North American 
Open Poetry Contest, 
which awards over $12,000 
in prizes annually. 

Meat-A-Rama 
Saturday At HN 

A Meat-A-Rama will be 
held Saturday from 2 to 4 
p.m. at the American 
Legion Post, 1116 Sea St., 
Houghs Neck. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 773-4600 



Wed & Thurs Jan 13+14 

Gary OUtnan- Winona Ryder 

"Dracula"(R) 

A Horror Drama 

Eve's 7:00 only 



Starts Fri Jan 1 5 

Robin Williams 

•Toy«"(PG- 13) 

A Fantasy Comedy 

Fri & Sat 7:00 4 9:15 

Sun - Thurs 7:00 only 

Mon & Tues Dollar Night 



ALL SEATS $3.00 



VT«'' 



*;» y.-- 



.<at 



fiiir >ci^i'i\ 



■ 9" in 



204 On Atlantic Honor Roll 



Thunday, January 14, 1W3 Qaincy Sun Page 9 



Atlantic Middle School 
lists 204 students on the 
first quarter Honor Roll. 
High Honors 
Grade 6 
Hei Chan, Stephen 
Chu, Frankie Gee, 
Catherine Giordano, 
Renee Tasney. 

Grade 7 
Katherine Bailey, 
Jessica Chan, Julianna 
Chu, Alison Connors, 
Jennifer Craig, Regina 
Lee, Amanda McCloy, 
Kristina McManus, Henry 
Mei. 

Jennifer Nielson, 
Megan O'Donnell, Felipe 
Omeles, Chi Pham, Wei- 
Chen Shiah, Ho Minb Tan, 
Sue Ellen Wong, Diane 
Yu. 

Grade 8 
Jennifer Alberti, Siu 
Chan, Michelle Cole, 
Michael Doyle, Margaret 
Eng, Annie Gee, Leanne 
Joyce. 

Wai Lau, Jackson Lee, 
Elaine Leung, Annie Liu, 
Krystin MacRitchie, Jodi 
McCann, Brian 

McFarland. 

Emm Moin, Fong Ng, 
Casey Ngo, Thai Nguyen, 
Kathy Sergeev, Ka Tarn, 
Eddie Tan, Rudy Wong. 
Honor 



Grade 6 

Robert Bell, Rachel 
Bonanni, Jeffrey Burke, 
Lisa Chan, Cecilia Cheng, 
Joanne Chiu, Jason 
CuUen, Michael Cunniff, 
Henry DiNino, Brian 
Doyle. 

Erin DriscoU, Nicholas 
Favorito, Joseph 
Frechette, Nancy Gardner, 
Jillian King, Jimmy Kou, 
Leng Kry, Wallace Kwan, 
Kathryn Lavery. 

Brenda Lee, Lowander 
Lee, Jane Lin, Jessica 
McGough, Yvette Molina, 
Michael Neal, Rachel 
O'Hara, Christopher Petit, 
Kim Pham. 

Andrew Roffey, Steven 
Saccoccio, David Shenk, 
Wei-Jia Shiah, Wai Yee 
So, Eric Stoeckel, Kevin 
Walsh, Thomas Wilson, 
Judy Wong, Gary Yee. 
Grade 7 

Kara Alibrandi, Derrick 
Almond, Vincent Au, 
Tessie Belus, Miranda 
Bohl, Sean Carta, Michael 
Cen, Miu Chen, Victor 
Chen. 

Gloria Chow, Leo 
Connolly, • Laurena 
Copson, Kristy Deptula, 
Brian Ehrlich, Jessica 
IHanigin, Carrie Foley, 
Jennifer Francis, Brian 



Gates. 

Gregory Giokas, Jasmin 
Gonzalez, Anthony 
Greenwood, Christopher 
Hall, Guot Sang Hua, 
Chavone Johnson, 
Matthew Kane, Pauline 
Kwan, Serena Lee. 

Rachel Leschernier, 
Jennifer Leung, Gou 
Guang Li, Guo Xing Li, 
Ishwar Mahadeo, Leigh 
Ann Mahoney, Sharon 
Man, Alanna McDonough, 
Robin Ngo. 

Than Tri Nguyen, Than 
Phuong Nguyen, Tuan 
Nguyen, Yen Nguyen, 
Dhaval Patel, Nadine 
Shweiri, Jeffrey Solomon, 
Rebecca Surratt, Mark 
Torchetti. 

Carmen Tu, Kerry 
Twomey, Patrick Vasquez, 
Maryellen Walsh, Jerick 
Warrick, Man Wong, 
Kimberly Xu, Barbara 
Yan. 

Grade 8 
Joshua Ahern, 

Benjamin Battams, 
Jennifer Beazley, Daniel 
Calnan, Marianne Cannon, 
Lanna Chan, May Chan, 
Cynthia Chan, Vicky 
Chan. 

William Chan, William 
Cheong, Patricia 

Christello, Jeffrey Chu, 



Tax Assistance Available 
Through Council On Aging 



The Quincy Council on 
Aging is offering tax 
assistance to low and 
moderate income residents 
age 60 and over. 

Volunteers from the 
AARP-IRS Tax Aide 
Program will assist by 
doing or helping with tax 
returns and answering 
questions. 

The volunteers are 
trained by the IRS and the 
Massachusetts Department 
of Revenue and are 



knowledgeable about 
federal and state income 
taxes. 

Tax assistance will be 
available on Tuesdays, 
Wednesdays and 

Thursdays, beginning 
Tuesday, Feb. 2 through 
Thursday, April 8. Call the 
Council on Aging, 376- 
1245, Monday through 
Friday, 9 a.m to 4 p.m., to 
make an appointment. 

Residents should bring 
the following documents 
when meeting with the 



Hepatitis Seminar Jan. 27 
At Quincy Hospital 



A program on hepatitis 
will be held Wednesday, 
Jan. 27 at 7 p.m. at the 
Quincy Hospital Education 
Center. 

The program is part of 
the hospital's "Wellness 
Wednesday" series and is 
free to the public. 

Robert Sipzener, MD, 
specialist in internal 



medicne, and So-Fai 
Tsang, MD, infectious 
diseases specialist, both 
from Medical Associates 
of Quincy, will discuss 
diffierent types of hepatitis 
and how to avoid them. 

For information and 
reservations call 773-6100, 
ext. 4016. 



tax- aide: 

•Federal and State tax 
forms. 

•Copy of 1991 income 
tax reports. 

•End of year report of 
income including, wages, 
pensions and social 
security received during 
1992. 

•End of year 1992 report 
on 1099 forms of bank 
interest, dividends, sale of 
stocks, etc. 

•Receipts or cancelled 
checks of any estimated 
tax paid in 1992. 

Also, to itemize 
deductions (Schedule A) 
you must bring evidence of 
property taxes paid, 
charitable contributions, 
medical expenses not 
reimbursed, etc. 



Survivors of 
Sexual Abuse 

A therapy group for women 

who were sexually abused 

For Information Call: 

Mona Barbera, Ph.D. 

547-2268 



^^^^ Adult & Continuing 

Education 



^P0RT13S^«1 



CENTER FOR TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

(formerly Quincy Voc-Tech) 

107 Woodward Avenue 

Quincy, MA 02169 

Located across from YMCA 

Registration at Center for Technical Education: 

January 11-14, 1993 
January 19-21, 1993 
All classes will be held on Monday and Wednesday Evenings 
For additional information, calL John McLaughlin 984-8888 
Courses offtTcd: QT/D, SJ^T, Computers, 'Business, Trade dr 'Voc. Reparation 
"Lniicftment 'Programs and ifu ^rts. 



6:30-9:00 p.m. 
6:30-9:00 p.m. 



Paul Conroy, George 
Culbreth, Brian Degan, 
Khanh Diep. 

Elizabeth Downey, 
Christopher Erler, Victor 
Fok, Sean Glennon, 
Christine Goff, Christine 
Ha, Maggie He, John 
Heim, Barbara Holbert. 

Christine Jones, Ross 
King, Dawn Kohler, Lon 
Kry, Steve Law, Angela 
Lee, Li Hong Li, Brenda 
Linehan, Zhi Liu, Edward 

Lewis Man, Vonnery 
Marcial, Magdalena 
Marczuk, Lori McCallum, 
Lynsey McNally, Wai Ng, 
Danathuy Nguyen, Sean 
O'Toole. 

Mark Paulsen, James 
Potter, Erica Quinn, 
Matthew Quinn, Danielle 
Rinaldi, Laura Saccoccio, 
Michael Sampson, RacVjl 
Shaw. 

Nicholas Shea, 
Christine Shields, Yu Lin 
Shum, Daniel Stock, Scott 
Stuart, Erika Thompson, 
Kara Timbone, Jessica 
Vega. 

Amy Vermette, Dai 
Trang Vo, Brian Walsh, 
Shannon Williamson, Eric 
Wirtz, Vincent Yu, 
Thomas Zangla, Li Zhao. 




BERNIE REISBERG, right, owner ofBemle's Modern For- 
mal Shops, was the $1,000 grand prize winner in the recent 
Quincy Center Business and Professional Association Christ- 
mas drawing. Presenting the check are Eileen Cohen, executive 
director of the QCBPA, and George White, association presi- 
dent. 

(Photo Quick of Quincy) 



'Money Management' 
Series At Beechwood 



A six-week workshop 
titled "Tips for Better 
Money Management" 

began Wednesday at 
Beechwood Community 
Life Center, 225 Fenno St. 

A round-table 

discussion will be held 
each Wednesday at 7 p.m. 

Workshop leader Bob 
Carlson, a retired educator 



and financial planning 
consultant, will discuss 
mutual funds, morigage 
acceleration, rule 72 in 
finance, differences in life 
insurance, etc. 

Pre-enrollment is 
recommended. Cost is $3 
per session or $15 for all 
six weeks. For information 
call Mary Centola, 471- 
5712. 



Seton OB/GYN Associates 

of 
St. Margaret' si St. Elizabeth's 

announces the opening of the 

Roslindale office with 

Paul J. Hull MD and 

Shah Naderi, MD, MPH 

New patients are now being accepted. 

Please call 617-323-1084. 
1 Corinth Street, Roslindale 



7\ 



People Advance By Degrees 

At Quincy College you can begin your degree 
program this spring at either our Quincy or Ply- 
mouth campuses. We offer complete degree 
programs at both campuses. And unlike other 
schools we haven't increased tuition for four years. 
Take your next step forward now at Quincy College. 

• Earn an Associate's Degree or Certificate 

• Full and Part-time Programs offered Days, 
Evenings and Saturdays 

• 28 Majors and Concentrations to choose from 

• Financial Aid and Child Care available 

• Campuses conveniently located in Quincy 
and Plymouth 

Classes Begin January 26, 1993 

For more information call 

(508) 747-5523 Plymouth Campus 

(617) 984-1700 Quincy Campus 




Quincy 
College 



34 Coddington Street, Quincy, MA 02169 
11 North Street, Plymouth, MA 02360 



Page 10 Qnincy Sua Thursday, January 14, 1993 



Crime 
Watch 



By ROBERT HANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quincy Police Department 



Police Log Hot Spots 




-^ 



You're Not Alone If 
You've Been Conned 

Have You Ever: 

•Given your credit card number to a phone solicitor? 

•Purchased land you haven't seen? 

•Agreed to home repairs that were quick, cheap, and 
paid for up front? 

•Bought stock on a stranger's suggestion? 

•Sent money as part of a chain letter? 

•Invested in a promising new company that quickly 
went out of business? 

Last year, swindlers used scams to cheat consumers 
out of about 40 million dollars. Be skeptical of 
anything that sounds too good to be true or promises 
easy money. If you are the victim of a con artist, 
repoit it to the police immediately. Get the word out to 
help protect your frieixls and neighbors. 

Think Smart, Avoid Cons: 

1. If it sourxls too good to be true, it probably is. 

2. Don't rust strangers who offer you instant cash. 

3. Get more information before buying "the sure 
thing." 

4. Check out charities before contributing. 

5. Don't give your credit card number to anyone 
over the phone. 

6. Whenever you are asked to turn over a sizable 
amount of cash, be cautious. Why is cash necessary? 
Why not a check? Avoid large cash transfers. Consult 
with trusted friends or family before making your 
decision. 

7. It is unfortunate, but homes have been lost as a 
result of signing a simple TV repair contract. Signing a 
contract is not a frivolous matter. The contract may be 
secured by a deed of trust on your home. It may 
include a provision that failure to pay on time will 
permit a judgement to be entered against you. 
Contracts can be sold to a bank or finance company for 
collections, although these institutions have no 
responsibility for the quality of the product delivered or 
work performed. 

8. Be wary of any pressure that you must act 
immediately or lose out. There is no better insurance 
than dealing with reputable businesses or people. 

9. Report scams to the police, and if asked do 
testify in court to help stop this type of crime. 

10. If you have any questions about the reliability or 
legitimacy of a firm, contact the Attorney General's 
office of Consumer Affairs at 727-8400. 

Family Services 
At Quincy Hospital 



Services are available 
for women and famiUes at 
Quincy Hospital. For 
information call 773-6100 
and the extension listed or 
call ext. 4016. 

Breast Feeding 
Classes: Ext. 3112. 

Childbirth Education: 
Including first-time, 
refresher and cesarean 
childbirth classes, ext. 
3112. 

Early Pregnancy: 

Classes to answer 
questions in the initial 
stages of pregnancy, ext. 
3112. 

Nutritional Support 
for Women, Infants and 
ChUdren (WIC): Offers 
nutritional counseling and 
supplemental food to 
participants who meet 
eligibility requirements, 
770-4242. 



Pediatric Pre- 

Hospitalization Program: 

To prepare children for 
their stay in the hospital, 
ext. 3121. 

Pediatric Tours: For 
groups of school-aged 
children, ext. 4016. 

Rehabilitation Ser- 
vices: Physical therapists 
can treat pelvic and back 
pain that may occur during 
pregnancy. Most insurance 
companies cover all or a 
portion of these services if 
your physician prescribes 
this service, ext. 4166. 

Safe Babysitting 
Program: For children 
age 10 and over, ext. 3121. 

Sibling Orientation 
Program: A one-hour 
class to prepare children 
for the family's "new 
arrival," ext. 3112. 




Tuesday, Jan. 5 

Break, 5:04 a.m., 10 Blancbard Rd., Photovision. 
Entrance gained by breaking a rear window. 

Attempted break, 8:54 a.m., 9 Quarry St. 
Dominic's Catering. 

Break, 7:41 p.m., 53 Florence St. A VCR was 
among the items stolen. 

Attempted break, 9:34 p.m., 144 Franklin St. 
McKay's Breakfast and Lunch. 

Wednesday, Jan. 6 

Break, 12:18 a.m., 36 School St., Golden Brown 
Donut. Establishment ransacked. 

Break, 5:32 a.m., 35 Franklin St., Delaney's Pub. 

Break, 1:47 p.m., 38 Cranch St. Residents cam 
home from vacation to discover break. 

Break, 6:07 p.m., 24 Field St. Apartment broken 
into. 

Break, 6:29 p.m., 66 Taylor St. Under 
investigation. 

Break, 8:50 p.m., 76 Babcock St. VCR and other 
items stolen. 

Thursday, Jan. 7 

Break, 6:54 a.m., 25 Copeland St. Furnace Brook 



Florist. Rear door smashed. 

Saturday, Jan. 9 

Break, 9:56 a.m., 290 Washington St. Hassan 
Bros. Inc. 

Break, 4:27 p.m., 17 Prospect St. 
Sunday, Jan. 10 

Robbery, 1:40 a.m., 511 Hancock St. Cambridge 
cab driver reports he transported a party to this 
location, when suspect took his money and bolted from 
cab. Driver was struck with a rock. Suspect is a 
Hispanic male, 5' 9" curly hair, wearing a long black 
coat. 

Break, 1:16 p.m., 10 Winter St. Apartment broken 
into. 

Break, 2:57 p.m., 49 Billings Rd. The Rock Shop. 

Attempted break, 6:51 p.m., 85 Alrick Rd. Under 
investigation. 

Services for the Week 

Total calls serviced: 976; total arrests, 58; total 
stolen cars, 10. 

If you have any information on any of the above 
crimes, or any crime, please call the Quincy Policfi 
Detective Bureai at 479-1212 ext. 312. You will not 
be required to identify yourself, but it could help. 



'Who's Who' List 115 Students From Quincy 



The 26th annual edition 
of Who's Who Among 
American High School 
Students features 115 
students frt)m Quincy. 

Students are nominated 
by high school principals 
and guidance counselors, 
national youth groups, 
churches, or by the 
publishing company based 
upon students' performance 
in scholarship award 
contests or extracurricular 
activities. 

Final selection is 
determined on the basis of 
criteria including high 
achievement in academics 
and leadership in school 
activities, athletics or 
community service. 

The 26th edition of 
Who's Who, featuring 
students from the 1991-92 
school year, includes 
nearly 700,000 students or 
about five percent of the 



nation's 12,000,000 high 
school students. 

Local students include: 

Abigail Anastasi, Kara 
Bagen, Meghan Barry, 
Maryellen Blake, Garett 
Butkuss, Leo Cheng, 
Aimee Chin, Randolph 
Chu, Maura Crowley, Rain 
Deveau, Ralph DiMattia, 
Joanna Dyer. 

Maryellen Eddy, Leilah 
Eklund, Breeda Faherty, 
Lynne Ferley, Nancy 
Glennon, David Goodman, 
Jessica Hoel, Masanobu 
Horiyama, Martin Joyce, 
Brian LaRoche, Gail- 
Marie Lorandeau, Darlene 
Magee, Jennifer Masters, 
Deborah McArd]e. 

Susan McCole, 
Margaret McLean, 
Michelle Minichello, 
Robyn Mitchell, Melanie 
Moffett, Dean Morris, 
Sarah Nelson, Patricia 
Nugent, Jana O'Grady, 



Susan O'Connell, Jean 
Pacifico, Jessica Picarski, 
■ Samuel Poon. 

Joe Renzi, Maggie 
Ryan, Nicole 

Shaughnessy, Robert 
Shaw, Amy Sheeley, Erin 
Sullivan, Anna Tom, 
David Tremblay, Cheryl 
Vickers. 

Jacqueline Bradford, 
Amy Bulger, Patrick 
Callahan, Christina 
Campbell, Catherine Chin, 
Gina Climo, liana Cobban, 
Amy Detwiler, Katherine 
Doherty, Kerry Evans, 
Justine Fagerlund, David 
Flaherty. 

Tara Guamieri, Katie 
Gustafson, Kim Jurevitch, 
Raymond Lee, William 
Lee, Maureen Lind, 
Angela Marinillie, Karen 
McCabe, Kathleen 
McDonald, Tracy 
O'SuUivan, Dan Reilly, 
Heather Rendle, Danielle 



Rinella, Susan Sheehan. 

Mark Sinclair, Keri 
Sirois, William Sit, 
Stephanie Suchan, 
Christopher Sullivan, 
Dawn Tape, Laura Walty, 
Jennifer Whalen, Jennifer 
White, Sigrid Wohlrab, 
Steven Wong, Gi Wen Ye, 
Canan Yesilcimen. 

Jennifer Brams, Susan 
Brams, Jenny Chan, Laura 
Christopherson, William 
Degan, Greg DiBella, 
Calece Greeley, Lee 
Hughes, Katie Keating, 
Paula Langille, Alta Lee, 
Nancy Lee, Samson Lee, 
Keith Lentini, Racbael 
Liu. 

Terrence Manning, 
Eileen McDonagh, Noreen 
McDonagh, Mai Mai Ng, 
Miyon Park, Timothy 
Sherman, Rebecca 
Squires, Sean Vermette, 
Christine Welch, Kristen 
Wilson, Amy Wong, Om 
Yos, Eric Yu. 



Quincy College Reports Record Enrollment 



Quincy College 
aimounces fall enrollment 
figures which show the 
sixth consecutive year of 
strong growth. 

Enrollment at the 
Quincy campus is up by 
over 9 percent and the 
Plymouth campus has 
increased by 200 percent, 
the college reports. 

Over the past six years, 
enrollment at Quincy 
College has risen by 83 
percent, making it the 
fastest growing college in 
the state. By way of 



comparison, the average 
growth for all colleges in 
Massachusetts over the 
past 10 years has been 0.1 
percent. 

The new enrollment 
figures represent a record 
enrollment for the two year 
college located in Quincy 
Center. Registration 
figures show that Quincy 
College students come 
from over 80 different 
towns in Massachusetts 
and 38 foreign countries. 
Quincy College now has 



SHINE Program At 
Quincy Council On Aging 

The Quincy Council on 



the third highest 
enrollment of international 
students among two year 
colleges in New England. 

It is the number one 
pubUc college in the state 
in its enrollment of women 
who comprise 870 percent 
of the student body and 
number five in the 
enrollment of minorities at 
19.6 percent. The average 
Quincy College student is 
27 years old. 

Richard Pessin, Dean of 
College and Student 



Services, said "Quincy 
College offers a high 
quality education at 
affordable prices. We 
haven't raised tuition in 
four years. Who else can 
say that?" 

Quincy College is now 
accepting applications for 
the spring semester for 
both the Quincy and 
Plymouth campuses. 
Evening courses are also 
offered at sites in Hanover, 
Wareham, Dorchester and 
Springfield. 



The longest winter in the solar system is 21 years long 
and occurs on the south polar regions of Uranus. The 
temperature then is estimated to be minus 362 degrees 
Fahrenheit. 



Aging announces it now 
offers the services of the 
SHINE (Serving Health 
Information Needs of 
Elders) Program. 

SHINE is a state 
sponsored program and 
will be administered 
locally through the 
Council on Aging. 

The program's purpose 
is to provided timely, 
accurate, unbiased 
information to seniors 
regarding health benefits. 
SHINE is staffed by 
trained volunteers who are 
knowledgeable in the 
areas of Medicare, 
Medicaid. Health 



Maintenance 

Organizations, Long Term 
Care Insurance and other 
health benefit matters. 

A SHINE counselor will 
be available each 
Thursday at the Council on 
Aging, 1120 Hancock St., 
beginning Jan. 7 from 9 to 
11:30 a.m. Counselors are 
available by appointment 
and telephone 

consultation. 

"Health benefits and 
insurance matters change 
often," said Brian 
Buckley, director of the 
Council On Aging. "When 
in doubt about your 
coverage, get the facts and 
contact a SHINE 
Counselor at 376-1247." 



QCBPA 'After Five Social' 
At River Bay Club Jan. 27 



The Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association will hold an 
"After Five Networking 
Social" for its members 
Wednesday, Jan. 27 ft^om 
5:30 to 7 p.m. at the River 
Bay Qub, 99 Brackett St. 

Cost is $5 per person. 



payable at the door. 
Members are asked to 
bring their business cards. 
Wine and hors d'oeuvres 
will be served. 

For reservations, call 
the QCBPA office at 471- 
3232. 



John Hill Awarded Certificate 



John Hill of Puritan 
Drive, Quincy, and current 
director of advising at 
Curry College, was 
recently awarded a 
Certificate of Merit from 
the National Academic 
Advising Association. 



Hill, who has taught at 
Curry since 1969, was 
cited for his personal 
advising philosophy. He 
was one of only 30 
advising professionals 
nationwide to receive the 
award. 



ThnrsdAj, January 14, 1S>93 Qulncy Sun Page II 

Gillis, Marshall Sworn Into Office 




CLIFFORD MARSHALL of Quincy, left, is administered 
the oath of office for Norfolk County sheriff from Henry 
Anslie, administrative assistant to the Norfolk County 
Board of Commissioners. Looking on is Evie DeVoure, 
secretary of the board. Marshall begins his fourth sixth- 
year term as the county's sheriff. 



JOHN GH^LIS of Quincy, left, is sworn into office as a 
Norfolk County commissioner by Henry Anslie, 
administrative assistant to the Board of Norfolk County 
Commissioners. GUlis, who retired in October after 
serving 94! years as assistant city clerk and city clerk in 
Quincy, was elected to a four-year term on the board in 
November. 



NEW NORFOLK COUNTY commissioner John GUlis is 
Joined by his wife, Violet, right, and their daughter, 
Pamela DeGennaro, after taking the oath of office during 
a ceremony held at the Norfolk County Administrative 
Office, High St., Dedham. Gillis and WiUiam O'Donnell 
were elected to the board in November, succeeding 
former commissioners Mary Collins of Quincy and 
James ColUns of Milton. (Matt Mulvey photos) 



QHS In College Planning Program 



Quincy High School 
will participate as one of 
six high schools in the 
state in the pilot of the 
College Planning Program, 
a joint project of the 
Higher Education 
Information Center and 
Nellie Mae. 

The program will 
provide students with the 
use of Petersen's 1993 
College Search Software. 
Counselors will be trained 



to help students use the 
software Feb. 23 at 9 am. 

There will be an 
orientation assembly for 
all 11th graders March 3 
presented by Ron Ancrum, 

who will demonstrate the 
search software. Students 
will receive College 
Planning Program packets 
including information to 
students in the college 
selection process and a 



Quincy Nursing Homes Raise 
$36,000 For Cancer Research 



questionnaire. 

A woikshop for parents 
an plaiming for college 
ind managing college 
costs will be held 
Wednesday, March 3 at 7 
p.m. in the Quincy Method 
Center. 

Computer software 
designed to help students 
develop a list of colleges 
related to their interests 
and goals will be available 
through the guidance 
office March 1 through 
March 31. 



Quincy Nursing Center 
and Robbin House 
Convalescent Home 
recently helped raise more 
than $36,500 to support 
cancer research and 
treatment at Dana-Farber 
Cancer Institute as part of 
its "Hope... for Tomorrow" 
campaign. 

Hillhaven Corporation, 
which owns the two 
Quincy homes, has now 
contributed a six-year total 
of $173,500. 

Philip Sher, a New 
England-based Hillhaven 
administrator and six-year 



survivor of lymphoma, 
conceived the "Hope... for 
Tomorrow" campaign. It is 
his way of giving back to 
the Institute for his second 
chance at Ufe. 

Hillhaven Corporation, 
begun in 1946 as a single 
nursing home in Olympia, 
Washington, now operates 
longterm care centers in 
38 states and retirement 
housing facilities in 14 
states. Its subsidiary, 
Medi-Save Pharmacy, 
operates retail and 
institutional pharmacies in 
23 states. 



Agnitti 

INSURANCE 

HOME -AUTO -BUSINESS 




(F MASSACHUSETTS BA^ 




Anthony L. Agnitti 

CALL FOR A QUOTE ON 

PROPER INSURANCE 

COVERAGE AT 
COMPETTITVE PRICES 

770-0123 



Drop In For Your Free 
Insurance Dictionary 

So Ohligatu>n 



2 1 FRANKLIN ST., QUINCY 




Mark C. Jaehnig D.C. 

Wishes to announce 
the relocation of his 
chiropractic office to 

110 Billings Road 

North Quincy MA 02171 

If you have any questions or would like to 

make an appointment please call Dr. Mark 

Jaehnig at Quincy Chiropractic Office 

773-4400 
We are accepting new patients at this time. 



Photo Quick of Quincy 

1 363 Hancock St., Quincy Center 
Video Duplication 
Special This Week 

Share Your Taped 
Holiday Memories 

472-71 31 



Appreciation Party 

For You 

State Representative 

Mike Bellotti 

Invites You To Join Us 

Friday, January 15 

at Pat Flanagan's 

79 Parkingway, 

Quincy Center 

7-10 pm 

No Charge 
Music and Food 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 14, 1993 



Cahill Says Hancock 

Development Plan 

'Has Too Many Holes' 



Cont'd From Page J 

road could result in 
demolition of more stores 
on the west side of 
Hancock St. 

"Not necessarily," 
Sheets said. "The 
connector could go through 
the old Kincaide site." 

Cahill also said he fears 
businesses will be 
disrupted during 

construction and that there 
won't be enough parking 
downtown during the 



project. 

Sheets said the project 
will begin construction on 
the existing parking lot 
and may first build the 
new parking facility. 

"We would work to 
ensure adequate parking," 
the mayor said. 

Sheets said retail space 
would be built in the 
present parking area before 
any existing stores are torn 
down which would allow 



present stores a chance to 
move into the new space. 

"I can't see how you 
can keep businesses open 
and build without 
disruption," said Cahill, 
who offered an alternative 
at the Hancock lot. 

"You could develop on 
the site (parking lot) and 
maybe face it the other 
way (towards Chestnut St. 
and McGrath Highway). 
That could work," he said. 



Super Stop & Shop 
Planned At Pneumatic Scale 



(ContdFromPageS) 

Ward 5 and the Boston 
Gear site. 

Shaw's Supermarkets is 
reportedly interested in 
locating a supermarket at 
the Boston Gear site as 
well. 

•We'll look at any 
proposal from anyone," 
Phelan said. He added that 
a supermarket or other 
retail development at the 
site would require a 
special permit from the 
city and that neighbors 
concerns would have to be 
addressed before he would 
support it. 

Lawson said company 
officials have met with 



employees to discuss the 
potential move and that 
reaction has been 
"generally positive." 

"The company has been 
very forward about 
presenting us with the 
initial information... They 
haven't seemed to hide 
anything. They've been up 
front," said Charles Colby, 
president of Local 444, 
Retail Wholesale 
Department Store Union. 

Colby, a long-time 
Quincy resident, represents 
160 union members. He 
said employees have 
experienced "anxiety" 
about relocating ever since 
speculation began last July 
about Stop & Shop buying 



the Pneumatic Scale 
building. 

Colby said he does not 
feel that Pneumatic Scale 
was seeking a buyer. The 
company recently made 
significant physical 
improvements at the site. 

"It's my understanding 
that the Stop & Shop offer 
was just too good to 
refuse," Colby said. 

Colby said employees 
want Pneumatic Scale to 
relocate in Quincy. 

"Both sites could be 
under consideration," he 
said. "I'm pretty sure 
Boston Gear has been 
looked at and pretty sure 
Jordan Marsh has been 
mentioned." 



HCHP, Quincy Hospital 
Form Closer Ties 



Harvard Community 
Health Plan (HCHP) and 
Quincy Hospital have 
established a special 
emergency care 

arrangement for members 
of HCHP's Quincy and 
Braintree sites. 

Quincy and Braintree 
HCHP members needing 
emergency care after 9 
p.m. when the Centers are 
closed may be referred to 
Quincy Hospital's 
Emergency Department 
(ED) where they will 
benefit from the most 
advanced technology and 
a staff of medical 
professionals specializing 
in emergency care. 



SECONDARY 
LUNCH 



Jan. 18-22 

Mon: Martin Luther 
Ling Day. No School. 

Tues: hamburger on a 
roll, cole slaw or salad, 
fruit juice, jello, milk. 

Wed: American cold 
cut sandwich, chopped 
lettuce with dressing, 
fruit juice, fresh apple, 
milk. 

T h u r s : turkey 
fricassee, sweet potato, 
peas, fresh baked wheat 
roll, jello, milk. 

Fri: breaded veal 
cutlet with sauce, side 
order of rotini, fresh 
baked ItaUan roll, fruit 
juice, milk. 



The advantage of this 
type of arrangement is the 
continuity of care it 
provides for patients. A 
patient receiving 
authorization to use 
Quincy Hospital remains 
part of a coordinated 
system on the South Shore 
which ensures that 
information about the 
emergency visit is 
forwarded to the patient's 
HCHP primary care 
provider. 

"The emergency care 
arrangement addresses the 
patient's concern for 
immediate medical 
treatment," said Ellen 
Zane, director of Quincy 
Hospital, "and we are very 
pleased to be working 
cooperatively with HCHP 
to assure their members 



ELEMENTARY 
LUNCH 



Jan. 18-22 

Mon: Martin Luther 
King Day. No School. 

Tues: Early Release 
Day. No lunch served. 

Wed: Apple sauce, 
golden brown pancakes, 
sausage links, maple 
syrup, celery sticks, milk. 

Thurs: curly rotini 
with meat sauce, fresh 
baked Itahan roll, fruit 
juice, milk. 

Fri: grilled cheese 
sandwich, tater tots, fruit 
juice, milk. 



Quincy 2000 Director 

To Reach Out To All 

Segments Of Community 



Cont'd Fnm Page 1 

Neighborhood Club, it was 
announced Tuesday by 
Thomas M. Galvin, Quincy 
2000 chairman of the 
board, president and CEO. 

He will begin his new 
position Tuesday, Jan. 19. 
Salary, which will be 
funded through 

membership dues, was not 
disclosed but is believed 
to be in the $50,000 range. 

Both Galvin and Mayor 
James Sheets, who 
spearheaded the effort to 
create the private-public 
partnership, praised 
D'Aprix as the right man 
for the job. 

"Mr. D'Aprix brings to 
the position significant 
economic development 
experience and a solid 
working knowledge of non- 
profit public/private 
economic development 
entities," Galvin said. 
"He was chosen 
unanimously by our search 
committee out of 156 
applicants and seven 
finalists for the position. 
We are not only 
enthusiastic, but we are 
confident we have made 
the best choice." 

Sheets said, "I'm 
pleased with Chuck 
D'Aprix because he has a 
tremendous marketing 
background. If you look at 
his experience, he's been 
a marketing person as well 
as a planner. 

"I think he brings a 



wealth of experience. 
(The partnership) will 
move now by leaps and 
bounds because we have a 
full-time marketing person 
on board." 

The mayor also said 
D'Aprix has strong 
interpersonal skills, 
essential to communicate 
effectively with the public 
and private sectors. 

Before taking the 
executive director's 
position, D'Aprix served 
several months as a 
project director for the 
Economic Development 
and Investment 

Corp.(EDIC)/Boston, 
where be was responsible 
for attracting targeted 
industries to the City of 
Boston. 

In 1989, he founded 
Economic Development 
Counsellors, a Boston- 
based organization which 
boasted a national and 
international client base. 
He remained there three 
years as part owner. 

Previously, D'Aprix was 
manager of marketing and 
communications for 
Combined Properties, Inc., 
for two years. From 1984 
to 1987, he was assistant 
executive director of The 
Lowell (Mass.) Plan Inc., 
a public-private economic 
development partnership. 

A 1979 graduate of the 
College of Saint Rose, 
D'Aprix received a 
bachelor of arts degree in 



polirical science. He 
received a master of 
science degree in public 
relations from Syracuse 
University in 1984, and is 
working on his thesis for 
bis master of science 
degree in management 
from Lesley College. 

A resident of Brighton, 
D'Aprix plans to relocate 
to Quincy soon. 

After The Quincy 2000 
Corporation held its first 
organizational meeting in 
October, a search 
committee was formed to 
find an executive director. 
Besides Galvin, the 
committee included 
Thomas E. Broderick, 
South Shore Building 
Trades Council; Michael 
F. Kenealy, Key Realty; 
and Richard H. Meade, 
Quincy plarming director. 

"We had purposely 
comprised our selection 
committee to represent a 
diverse group of business 
and trade union people," 
Galvin said, "and we 
collectively feel Charles 
D'Aprix had the best 
qualifications to bring to 
the position. The directors 
and officers of The Quincy 
2000 Corporation are eager 
to work towards setting our 
goals for the future of 
Quincy. 

Galvin said the 
corporation has about 90 
members from the public 
and private sectors. 



access to high quality 
medial care and 
technology." 
Successful 
communication links 
between Quincy Hospital 
and HCHP are crucial for 
assuring the best in 
emergency care. This 
emergency care 

arrangement expands the 

relationships already 
existing between HCHP 
and the orthopedics and 
the obstetrical/gynecology 
departments at Quincy 
Hospital. 

Timothy Sherman 
Merit Scholar 

Timothy A. Sherman of 
Quincy, a student at 
Boston College High 
School, has been named a 
Commended Student in 
the 1993 National Merit 
Scholarship Program. 

About 35,000 

Commended Students 
throughout the nation are 
being honored for their 
outstanding performance 
on the 1991 Preliminary 
Scholastic Aptitude 
Test/National Merit 
Scholarship Qualifying 
Test, which was the route 
of entry to the 1993 Merit 
Program. Commended 
Students have shown 
exceptional academic 
promise by placing among 
the top five percent of 
more than one million 
program entrants. 



Three Local Real Estate 
Firms Join HomeView Service 



Three Quincy-based 
real estate services have 
joined HomeView, a 
broker-sponsored hi-tech 
home search service that 
is free to buyers. 

Century 21 Annex 
Realty, 49 Beale St., 
WoUaston; Duhallow Real 
Estate, 273 Nevi^ort Ave., 
Quincy; and Marina Bay 
Real Estate Services, 500 
Victory Rd., Squantum, 
are part of HomeView, 
considered the first major 
technology breakthrough in 
real estate since dial-up 



multiple listing services 
(MLS) were introduced 25 
years ago. 

As HomeView member 
brokers, the three local 
real estate services have 
their Ustings entered into 
HomeView 's interactive 
digital-picture database. 
At a HomeView Center, 
Needham, buyers preview 
hundreds of homes in 
minutes using a touch- 
screen computer. The 
"fingertip tours" recreate 
the feel of a real visit— 
from the first sight of the 



house to browsing through 
rooms and touring the 
grounds. 

After buyers select 
homes matching their 
criteria, HomeView 
arranges appointments 
with the listing broker for 
on-site home visits. 

For more information, 
call Arthur Foley, Century 
21 Annex Realty, 472- 
4330; Robert McAuliffe, 
Duhallow Real Estate, 
773-7363; or Sandra 
Fennelly, Marina Bay 
Real Estate Services, 847- 
1820. 



2 Residents Honored As MS Volunteers 



Two Quincy residents 
were honored at a 
Volunteer Appreciation 
Party recently hosted by 
the Massachusetts Chapter 
of the National Multiple 
Sclerosis Society. 

Paul Poleo was named 
"Outstanding Corporate 
Team Volunteer Captain." 
For the past three years, 
his leadership has enabled 
the U.S. Postal Service 
Boston Division Team to 
be the number one 
challenge team in the 
Super Cities WALKS. To 
date, Poleo's team has 
raised over $70,000. 

Brian McCourt was 
honored as the 
"Outstanding Community 



Event Volunteer" for 
organizing, with his six 
brothers, the first annual 
Bob McCourt Run for MS 
in Harwichport. The event. 



which raised $13,000, was 
in honor of their father. 

Bob McCourt, and all who 
must cope with MS. 



Kathy Kittredge Physics 
Teaching Resource Agent 



Kathy Kittredge, a 
physics teacher at Quincy 
High School, has become 
a physics teaching 
resource agent of the 
American Association of 
physics teachers. 

The program selects 
outstanding teachers 
throughout the United 
States and enables them to 
be a resource to other 



teachers in their area. 
Kittredge finished training 
this summer, and is 
conducting workshops for 
other teachers. 

She has also organized 
high school Physics 
Olympics in the Boston 
area and serves on the 
board of the New England 
Section of the American 
Association of Physics 
Teachers. 



Thursday, January 14, 1993 Qulncy Sun Page 13 



Josephine Brillo Shea 

Re-elected To Norfolk 

County Retirement Board 



Hearing Continued On 
Shooters Club Expansion 



Josephine Brillo Shea 
of Quincy was recentiy re- 
elected to the Norfolk 
County Retirement Board. 

Elected to the board in 
1989, Shea, 41, won a 
second three-year term by 
topping a four-candidate 
field. She polled 1,655 
votes while her nearest 
challenger, John Fallon, a 
Stoughton firefighter, had 
930 votes. Dot Walsh, a 
retiree, was third with 500 
votes and Joan Millet of 
Norfolk County Hospital 
finished fourth with 159 
votes. 

The election was 
conducted by mail ballots 
and results were tallied 
earlier this month. 

The board is comprised 
of three members: one 
elected, one ex-officio and 
one appointed. In addition 
to Shea, other members 
are Norfolk County 
Treasurer Robert Hall (ex- 
officio) and Tom Rorrie, 
Stoughton town treasurer 
(appointed). 

The board oversees a 
$140 million dollar 
pension fund. There are 
currently 6,000 active 
members and 3,000 retired 
members. 

Shea is employed as 
deputy superintendent of 
Administration and 
Finance for the Norfolk 
County Sheriff's Office. 
She manages a budget of 
more than $15 million and 
is responsible for the 
personnel issues of more 
than 270 employees. 



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JOSEPHINE 
BRILLO SHEA 

During her first term on 
the board, Shea helped 
create the Norfolk Benefit 
newsletter which informs 

Norfolk County retirees 
and active members of 
retirement issues. Also 
upon her request, the board 
approved and initiated the 
Norfolk County Employees 



Retirement Guide. 

Many pubUc retirement 
systems have used the 
updated and 

comprehensive manual 
and newsletter as models 
for their pubUcations. 

During her first term, 
Shea also proposed a 
comprehensive "Pre- 
Retirement Seminar" 
designed to help every 
member, active or retired, 
stay informed on 
retirement matters. The 
seminar features 
presentations on benefits 
and financial plaiming as 
well as assistance with 
legal estate and Social 
Security procedures. 

During her second term, 
Shea said she will address 
an early retirement 
incentive program and 
make a recommendation 
to the board. 

Shea is married to City 
Clerk Joseph Shea. They 
live on Heritage Rd. 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

The Quincy License 
Board Tuesday continued 
for one week a request 
ft^om Shooters Club Cafe, 
1585 Hancock St., for 
permission to expand their 
physical premises from 
1,248 to 2,557 square feet. 

Atty. Dennis O'Driscoll 
told the board the existing 
premises, located in the 
lever level of the Quincy 
Fair Mall, now consists of 

four billiard tables, a 
service bar seating 12 and 
four tables seating 16. The 
expaixled cafe would add 
three billiard tables and 
replace the existing tables 
with seven booths seating 
28, as well as six 
additional seats. 

The expansion would 
also include men's and 
women's rest rooms, 
O'Driscoll said. 

City Qerk Joseph Shea 
read a letter from the 
Quincy Center Business 



and Professional 
Association voicing 
approval of the expansion. 
O'Driscoll said Ward 3 
Councillor Lawrence 
Chretien is also in favor. 

Health Commissioner 
Jane Gallahue said 
because Shooters has an 
All-AlcohoUc License, she 
wanted to clarify with the 
Alcoholic Beverages 
Control Commission 
(ABCC) exactly what 
kinds of food should be 
served at the cafe as a 
result of the expansion. 

Shooters currently does 
not serve food on its 
premises other than 



prepackaged items such as 
potato chips and peanuts, 
Gallahue said. The cafe 
also receives pizza 
delivered from the nearby 
Hollywood/Hollywood 
restaurant in the mall, 
according to O'Driscoll. 

The License Board 
decided at the end of last 
year that all requests 
connected to All-Alcoholic 
and Common Victualer 
Licenses would go before 
the board twice. The board 
agreed that the additional 
week would be enough 
time to contact the ABCC 
regarding Gallahue 's 
clarification. 



Sarah Beston 
Gymnastics Standout 



Twelve-year-old Sarah 
Beston of Quincy is off to 
a fine gymnastics season 
as she won the all-around 
competition for the third 
straight meet. 

Beston, a member of 
the Ellis School of 



Gymnastics team, scored 
an 8.45 on the vault, 8.85 
on the uneven bars, 8.25 
on the balance beam and 
8.95 on floor exercise. 

Sarah is a seventh 
grade student at Central 
Middle School. 



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471-3100 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 14, 1993 



Obituaries 



Joseph P. Dooling, 39 

Construction Worker 



A memorial service for 
Joseph P. Dooling, 39, of 
Quincy, was held Tuesday 
in Keohane Funeral Home, 
785 Hancock St. 

Mr. Dooling died Jan. 6. 

A construction worker, 
he had worked at Duane's 
wrecking company on 
Southern Artery in Quincy 
for several years and on 
various construction jobs. 

After attending Quincy 
schools, he took evening 
art courses in Braintree 
and created cartoons and 
portraits. 

Bom in Brookline, he 



Uved in Quincy aU his life. 

He is survived by his 
fiancee, Kathi Armin of 
Quincy; three brothers, 
Paul Dooling of Lowell, 
Thomas Dooling of Quincy 
and Arthur Dooling of 
Worcester; and an uncle, 
Thomas Osborne of 
Quincy. 

Funeral 
were by 
Funeral 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to Father Bill's Place, 38 
Broad St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 



arrangements 
the Keohane 
Home, 785 



Guy B. Gove, 78 

Self-Employed Auto Mechanic 



A funeral service for 
Guy B. Gove, 78, of 
Brockton, formerly of 
Quincy, was held Tuesday 
in the Lydon Funeral 
Home, 644 Hancock St. 

Mr. Gove died Jan. 9 at 
Quincy Hospital. 

He was a self-employed 
auto mechanic. 

Bom in Stonebam, he 
lived in Quincy for 26 
years before moving to 
Brockton four years ago. 
He bad also lived in 
Winthrop. 

He was a member of 



the Winthrop Elks and the 
Winthrop Masonic Lodge. 
He is survived by his 
wife, Florence (Sherman) 
Gove; a son, Guy Gove of 
Brockton; three daughters, 
Bette MacDonald of 
Quincy and Judith Young 
and Karen Gove, both of 
Brockton; a brother, 
Donald Gove of California; 
eight grandchildren, and 
six great-grandchildren. He 
was the father of the late 
Ruth Prunier. 

Burial was in Winthrop 
Cemetery. 




SCOTT DEWARE 



A THOUGHT 
FOR THE WEEK 

No funeral diractor In th* 
country would diaput* tho 
right of a family to apacify 
"No vtoHation' — If thatia tha 
way the family dealraa H. But, 
If aakad, wa ara aura avary 
funaral diractor would aug- 
gaat visitation In most caaaa. 

H has been proven throughthayaara that vialtatlon 
at the funeral home HELPS the family face tha reality 
of death . It haa bean proven a fam lly'a grief la laaaened 
by tha vlaK of fr landa who ahow concern for the family 
at a time of death. It la only human to want to expraaa 
feelings. And this applies to most people. H has been 
proven that ahock and aurprlae, emotional releaae, 
lofMibMas, diatreaa and anxiety ara emotional mooda 
that can be HELPED by the appearance of frienda. 
Worda are not neceaaary. Peraonal appearance la 
suff Ic lent. Visitation Is an act of kindneaa ... Theee are 
only a few of the reasons why funeral directora wel- 
come viaHation prior to and during a funeral aervlce ... 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the 'New England Funeral Trust' 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered to Any Distance 



Herbert E. Morgan, 78 

Co-Founded Manet Health Center; 
Retired Insurance Sales Representative 

A funeral service for ^^^'P^^* ^^'^e money for 



Thomas Dowling, 63 

Active In Sacred Heart Parish 



Herbert E. Morgan, 78, of 
Quincy, was held Monday 
in the Deware Funeral 
Home, 576 Hancock St. 

Mr. Morgan died Jan. 6 
while visiting his son in 
Charleston, S.C. 

He was a former sales 
representative for John 
Hancock Mutual Life 
Insurance Co. in Braintree 
and a co-founder of the 
Manet Community Health 
Center. 

A member of the 
Houghs Neck Community 
Council since its 
beginning, he had served 
as president of the group 
and was on its scholarship 
fiind board. 

He was the first 
president of the Broad 
Meadows School PTA, 
past president of the 
Atheiton Hough PTA, and 
a charter member of the 
Houghs Neck 

Congregational Church Mr. 
and Mrs. Club. He served 
on the executive board of 
the Quincy Parent-Teacher 
Council and Quincy Junior 
College. 

A charter member of 
the Serposs Dental 
Committee, he was also 
involved in estabUshing a 
community "honor Ubrary" 
at the Manet Health 
Center Building. He 
donated books to the 
library and rebuilt shelves 
to hold them. 

He wrote a column for 
the monthly bulletin of the 
Houghs Neck Community 
Council. 

He was a former crew 
chief for the city census, 
was chairman of the Red 
Feather Fund drive and 



R.E. PAPILE CO. 

1546 Hancock St., Quincy 

Memonal Gifts. Perpetuals. 

Plaques, Engraving, Prayer Cards. 

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S weeney Sro ikers 

HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY, MASS. 



I 



472-6344 



Channel 2. He was an 
election warden for 30 
years and an assistant 
scoutmaster for eight 
years. 

Former Mayor Francis 
McCauley appointed him 
to the Quincy Council on 
Aging. 

He retired from John 
Hancock after 31 years. 
During World War II, he 
was an electrical 
supervisor at the Hingham 
Shipyard and earlier had 
worked 15 years at 
Choate, HaU and Stewart 
in Boston. 

He was treasurer and 
scribe of Harvey's Salt- 
water Fishing Club in 
Quincy. 

Sailing, Hshing and 
lobstering were among his 
favorite pastimes. He also 
enjoyed cribbage, 
shuffleboard and his 
favorite game, biUiards. 

He was a member of 
the Manet Masonic Lodge, 
now the Quincy Masonic 
Lodge, and Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church. 

Bom in Dorchester, he 
was a graduate of Lincoln 
Preparatory School and 
Northeastern University 
Law School. 

Husband of the late 
Elizabeth "Libby" 
(Livingston) Morgan, he is 
survived by a son, Robert 
K. Morgan of Charleston, 
S.C; a sister, Doris E. 
Hearing of Somerville; two 
grandchildren and three 
great-grandchildren. He 
was the father of the late 
Louise E. Morgan. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Donations may be made 
to Houghs Neck 
Community Council 
Scholarship Fund, 1193 
Sea St., Quincy, MA 
02169; or Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church, 
310 Manet Ave., Quincy, 
MA 02169. 




QUINCY 
MEMORIALS Inc. 

18 Willard St. 
Quincy 02169 

"On The Expressway" 
Exit 9 Near E. Mihon Sq. 

Free Illustrated Catalog 
Budget Terms Available 



A funeral Mass for 
Thomas Dowling, 63, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Monday in Sacred Heart 
Church. 

Mr. Dowling died Jan. 6 
at Beth Israel Hospital in 
Boston after a brief illness. 
He grew up in 
Wollaston and began 
working for First National 
Stores at the age of 14. He 
retired in 1991 and 
subsequently worked part- 
time at Eventide 
Retirement Home. 

A Senior Olympics 
champion athlete, he 
recently won three gold 
medals in horseshoes, 
bowling and the long jump. 
When he was 40 he 
took up tap dancing and 
appeared with the 
Hingham Civic Music 
Theater, which he also 
served as president. 

He was president of the 
the Holy Name Society of 
Sacred Heart Church of 
North Quincy, as well as 
church lector, altar boy 
instructor and CCD 
teacher. For seven years, 
he was cubmaster for Pack 
27. 



He joined the Army in 
1951 and served until 1953 
in Fort Bragg, N.C. 

With his wife, Mary 
Elizabeth (Maher) 
Dowling, he traveled 
widely in his later years. 

He was a lifelong 
resident of Quincy. 

He is also survived by 
two sons, Thomas Dowling 
Jr. of Plymouth and 
Michael Dowling of 
Boston; two daughters, 
Elizabeth Goreham ^d 
Mary Newcomb of Quincy; 
two brothers, John S. 
DowUng of Abington and 
William A. Dowling of 
Quincy; two sisters, Mary 
Harris of Pembroke and 
Helen Siitonen of Quincy; 
and seven grandchildren. 
He was the brother of the 
late Joseph Dowling and 
James Dowling. 

Burial was in St Mary's 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to Sacred Heart Church, 
386 Hancock St., North 
Quincy, MA 02171. 



Agda S. Hudson, 84 

Former Hospital Dietitian 

funeral Mass for by two nephews, Richard 



Agda S. (Salmi) Hudson, 
84, of Quincy, formerly of 
Dorchester, was celebrated 
Jan. 9 in Most Precious 
Blood Church, Hyde Park. 

Mrs. Hudson died Jan. 6 
at Quincy Hospital. 

She was a former 
dietitian's aide at Carney 
Hospital in Dorchester. 

Wife of the late Patrick 
L, Hudson, she is survived 



Lewis of Hyde Park and 
Richard Fitzpatrick of 
Dedham; and many other 
nephews and nieces. She 
was the mother of the late 
Karl P. Hudson. 

Burial was in New 
Calvary Cemetery, Boston. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Carroll- 
Thomas Funeral Home, 
Hyde Park. 



Hyman Rohtstein, 84 



A funeral service for 
Hyman Rohtstein, 84, of 
Quincy, was held Jan. 8 in 
Levine Chapel, Brookline. 

Mr. Rohtstein died Jan. 
7 at the Hebrew 
Rehabilitation Center in 
Roslindale. 

He was a former 
salesman of bakery 
equipment. 

A veteran of World War 
II, he was born in 
Wolfeboro, N.H. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Celia (Merlis) 
Rohtstein; a son and 
daughter-in-law, George 
and Dena Rohtstein of 
Brookline; a daughter and 



son-in-law, Saundra and 
Norman Nissenbaum of 
Hull; two other daughters, 
Marcia Fonseca and Carol 
Fonseca, both of Newton; 
two sisters, Sadie Rubin 
and Rose Gray of Maiden; 
nine grandchildren and two 
great-grandchildren. He 
was the husband of the 
late Belle Rohtstein. 

Donations may be made 
to Quincy Visiting Nurse 
Association, Hospice 
Program, P.O. Box 2370, 
Quincy, MA 02169; or to 
the American Cancer 
Society, 247 

Commonwealth Ave., 
Boston, MA 02116. 



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Daniel O. Vespaziani, 36 

Former Project Engineer For Oil Co. 



A funeral Mass for 
Daniel O. Vespaziani, 36, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
yesterday (Wednesday) in 
St. John's Church. 

Mr. Vespaziani died 
Jan. 9. 

He was a former project 
engineer for the Arabian 
American Oil Co. in Saudi 
Arabia. 

A cum laude graduate 
of the University of 
Lowell, he was a member 
of its Chemical 
Engineering Honor 
Society, Alpha Gamma 
and Society of Omega 
Chi Epsilon. 

He was bom in Boston. 

He is survived by his 
father, Alexander 



Vespaziani; two brothers, 
Paul A. Vespaziani and 
John L. Vespaziani, both 
of Quincy; his 
grandmother, Nancy 
Vespaziani; two aunts, 
Sophie Rizzo of Randolph 
and Mary Palmer of 
Quincy; and an uncle, 
Orfeo J. Salvucci of 
Holbrook. He was the son 
of the late Lucy 
(Salvucci) Vespaziani. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Grimwood and 
Coletta Funeral Home, 
603 Adams St. 

Donations may be made 
to the charity of one's 
choice. 



Norina O. Cellucci, 80 

Seamstress For Many Years 

A funeral Mass for A. "Daniel" Cellucci, sht 



Norina O. "Nora" 
(Venditelli) CeUucci, 80, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
yesterday (Wednesday) in 
St. John the Baptist 
Church. 

Mrs. Cellucci died Jan. 
10 at Cardinal Gushing 
Hospital in Brockton after 
a long illness. 

She was a seamstress in 
the Boston garment 
industry for many years. 
She last worked for the 
Wilshire Company. 

Born and educated in 
Castelino, Italy, she came 
to the United States as a 
young woman. She lived in 
Quincy for 63 years before 
moving to Randolph 
nursing home two years 
ago. 

Wife of the late Donato 



is survived by a son, 
Daniel R. Cellucci of 
Hanover; a daughter, Alda 
Fratus-Donnelly of 
Randolph; three brothers, 
Joseph Venditelli of 
Weymouth, Gildo 
Venditelli of Tiverton, R.I. 
and Mario Venditelli of 
Maiden; a sister, lolanda 
Camicelli of Quincy; and 
two grandchildren. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the Multiple Sclerosis 
Society, 400-1 Totten 
Pond Road, Waltham, MA 
02154. 



Quincy Special Education 
PAC Meeting Tonight 



Quincy Parent Advisory 
Council to Special 
Education will meet 
tonight (Thursday) at 7:30 
p.m. in the Community 



Room at Stop & Shop, 
Newport Ave. 

The meeting is open to 
the public. 



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Jennie M. Pope., 89 

Formerly Employed As Cook 

A funeral service for Baptist Church and its 

HiUtoppers Group. 

Wife of the late Harold 
B. Pope, she is survived by 
two daughters, Patricia 
Hutto of Texas and Jean 
Ball of Quincy; a brother, 
George Little of North 
Quincy; eight 

grandchildren, and seven 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial in KnoUwood 
Memorial Park, Canton. 

Donations may be made 
to the Rrst Baptist Church 
Memorial Fund, 81 
Prospect Ave., WoUaston, 
MA 02170. 



Jennie Mabel (Little) 
Pope, 89, of Quincy, was 
held Monday in the 
Deware Funeral Home, 
576 Hancock St. 

Mr. Pope died Jan. 9 at 
the Braintree Manor 
Nursing Home. 

A former cook at the 
William B. Rice Eventide 
Home, she was also 
employed for many years 
at the former Dora B. 
Ferguson Catering Co. in 
Wollaston. 

Bom in Boston, she was 
a member of the First 



Eleanor M. Rynne, 82 

funeral Mass for Sister Ellen Jane Dullea of 



A 

Eleanor M. (Dullea) 
Rynne, 82, of Quincy, 
formerly of South Boston 
and Milton, died Jan. S at 
Quincy Hospital after a 
long illness. 

Bom in Boston, she 
lived in Quincy for 20 
years. 

Wife of the late Francis 
M. Rynne, she is survived 
by two sons, Edward 
Rynne of Woodbridge, Va. 
and Daniel Rynne Bothell, 
Wash.; four daughters, 
Eleanor Moring of Boeme, 
Texas, and Frances 
Matzdorff, Jeanne 
Sovereign and Qare Ladd, 
all of Tempe, Ariz.; a 
brother, Daniel F. Dullea 
of Quincy; four sisters, 



the Sisters of Charity of 
Nazareth of Wakefield, 
Sister Julia Dullea of the 
Sisters of Charity of 
Nazareth of Brockton, and 
Sister Mary Dullea and 
Sister Phyllis Dullea, both 
of the Sisters of Charity of 
Nazareth of Quincy; and 
IS grandchildren. 

Burial was in Milton 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Retirement Fund of 
the Sisters of Charity of 
Nazareth, c/o Regional 
House, 169 Fenno St., 
Quincy, MA 02170. 



Thursday, January 14, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 15 

Marie Mann, 74 

Appeared On Alzheimer's 

TV Show; Retired Secretary 

States in 1787. She had 

A funeral Mass for immigrated from Ireland in 

Marie "Agnes" (Walker) the 1700s. 
Mann, 74, of Quincy, was Born in Philadelphia, 

celebrated Jan. 7 in St. she moved to Quincy with 

Agatha's Church, Milton. her family when she was a 

Mrs. Mann died Jan. 5 freshman in high school, 

of Alzheimer's disease in She was vice president of 

the Braintree Manor her class at North Quincy 

Nursing Home. High School and later 

She first became aware attended business school, 
of a health problem, which A secretary for the 

was ultimately diagnosed Intemal Revenue Service 

as Alzheimer's, about 14 when she was a young 

years ago. In 1985 she woman, she subsequently 

appeared in "Whispering worked in a number of 

Hope," a nationally- secretarial positions and as 

televised program about a bank teller. She retired 

the disease. in 1980. 

An avid bridge player, She enjoyed home 

she was a member of the canning and growing 

Puritan Bridge Club in vegetables. 
Braintree. She competed wife of the late Howard 

in a number of G. Mann, she is survived 

toumaments and traveled by two daughters, Cynthia 

out-of-state to play the m. Haigh of Milton and 

game. Sandra D. Wagner of 

Formerly active in the Plymouth; a brother, John 

Wollaston Mothers Qub, Walker of New 

she served on several of Hampshire; two sisters, 

that group's committees Jeanette Malone of 

and had been active in its Dedham and Patricia 

bowling league. Mullen of Scituate; and 

She was a descendant nine grandchildren, 
of George Read of Burial was in Blue Hill 

Delaware, who signed the Cemetery, Braintree. 
Declaration of Funeral arrangements 

Independence in 1776 and were by the Alfred D. 

was a witness and Thomas Funeral Home, 

signatory to the proposed Milton. 
Constimtion of the United 



For those times 

when the 
darkness lingers 



With the loss of a loved one through death, it is helpful to be able to 
share the feelings and emotions which we all experience. 

ii^«*«^r--tr4/€. .X I for ffiost of us, there are family members, 

clergy, and friends who are ready to listen in a 
caring way. 

Yet. there are those who find it helpful to 
share their grief with someone outside their 
immediate circle of support. 

Because of our continuing commitment to 
the families we serve. Keohane Funeral 
Service is pleased to announce that Dr. 
Sherry Johnson has joined our staff as a Grief 

Counselor. Her educational background, professional experience and 

understanding manner can be particularly helpful. 

We are the first funeral home in New England to offer the service of 
a Grief Counselor. 





^ohano Tuneral Service 



KEOHANK FUNKRAi. IIOMK, INC. 

7IIS Hancock Street 

Quincy. MA 02170 

AI7-77.1-.155I 






PYNE FUNERAL HOME, INC. 

21 EmcfaM Sireel 

Hingham. MA 0204) 

61 7- 749-03 10 



KEOHANE FUNERAL HOME, INC. 

3)) Hancock Street 

Qvincy. MA 02171 

617-773-3551 



n 'mfil nil? vxj. 



1 



ii.tnr 



Pigc 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 14, 1993 

'Three Faces Of Peace' 
HN Congregational Topic 



The Rev. M. Alicia 
Corea will preach on 
"Three Faces Of Peace" 
at the 9 and 10:30 a.m. 
worship services Sunday at 
Houghs Neck 

Congregational Church, 
300 Manet Ave. 

Diaconate members 
serving at the 9 a.m. 
service will be Edwina 
Robinson and Paul 
Schofield. Greeter will be 
Ron Lemieux. 

At the 10:30 a.m. 
service, the choir will sing 
under the direction of 
Arden T. Schofield. 
Greeter will be Barbara 
Curran. Diaconate 
members serving will be 
Carol Lee Griffin and 



Harold McLaughlin. 

The coffee hour 
between the services will 
be hosted by Miriam 
Coombs. 

The Early Childhood 
Sunday School session for 
children ages 2 1/2 through 
Grade 1 will meet from 
8:30 to 10 a.m. The 
intermediate group will 
meet from 10 to 1 1:30 a.m. 

The church is equipped 
for the physically 
challenged. Those 
attending services are 
asked to bring donations 
for the baskets in the 
vestibule for Father Bill's 
Place and the PSSB 
Pantry Shelf. 



Robert Burns Night 
At First Presbyterian 



A Robert Bums Night 
will be held Saturday, Feb. 
6 at 6 p.m. at First 
Presbyterian Church, 270 
Franklin St., South Quincy. 

A traditional Scottish 
roast beef dirmer will be 
followed by a concert of 
Scottish music, dance, and 
Bums poetry. 

No tickets will be sold 



at the door. Cost is $12 for 
adults, $6 for children 12 
and uiKler. 

For tickets call Robert 
and Jean Jack at 472-3712, 
Scotty and Barbara Waters 
at 773-4106, Jeanie Fee at 
335-4780. For reservadoos 
call the church at 773- 
5575. 



Rev. James Kimmell 
To Preach Sunday 
At Faith Lutheran 



Rev. James L. Kimmell, 
pastor, will preach at the 
10 a.m. worship service 

Sunday at Faith Lutheran 
Church, 201 Granite St. 
All are welcome. 



Coffee and fellowship 
will follow. Christian 
Education for adults and 
children begins at 9 a.m. 

For more information 
caU the church office at 
472-1247. 



WoUaston Baptist Meeting Jan. 21 



Wollaston Baptist 
Church, Prospect Ave., 
Wollaston, will hold a 

meeting Thursday, Jan. 21 
at 7:30 p.m. 

Topics will include a 



report on the summer 
camping season at Camp 
Massasoit and a look at 
the Cub Scout programs 
for 1993. The progress on 
the chapel will also be 
discussed. 



Church of 
Saint John 
the Baptist 

44 School St., Quincy, MA 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Saturday 4:00 & 7:00 pm 

Sunday: 7 am, 

9 am, 11 am, 

12:30 and 5:30 pm 

Confessions in Chapel Sat. 3-3:45 pm 

-21 Gay St. 773-1021 




\ Rectory 



Religion 



'Malcolm X, King, America' 
First Parish Sermon Topic 



Dr. Sheldon W. 
Bennett, minister, will 
preach on "Malcolm X, 
Martin Luther King And 
America" at the 10:30 a.m. 
worship service Sunday at 
United First Parish Church 
(Unitarian Universalist), 
Quincy Sq. 

The sermon will 
examine the life, character 
and religious faith of 
Malcolm X, how his 
leadership in the struggle 
for a just society in 
America differed from that 
of Martin Luther King, Jr. 
and bow these two leaders 
were joined in common 
cause for civil rights. 



human worth and dignity. 

The church choir, 
directed by Norman Corey, 
will sing. Phil Curtis and 
Matt Malloy will usher. 

Visitors are welcome 
are invited to the social 
hour immediately 
following the service. 
Denyse Linden and Robert 
Machado will host. 

Historic First Parish, 
"Church of the 
Presidents," is located at 
1306 Hancock St., 
opposite City Hall. Church 
School and child care are 
provided (Brenda Chin, 
director). Call 773-1290 for 
information. 



The Awesome Meek- 
Topic At Bethany 



Martin Luther King, Jr. 
and Family Sunday will be 
observed at the 10 a.m. 
worship service Sunday at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, Quincy Center. 

The Rev, Roger 
Ketcham's sermon topic 
will be "The Awesome 
Meek." 

Children of the Church 
School will sit with their 
parents during the early 
part of the service. Rev. 
Ketcham will invite them 
to the chancel steps for his 
"Children in Focus." 

Scripture reader will be 



Amy Chenette. The 
chancel choir, directed by 
organist Gregory Flynn, 
will sing two selections 
appropriate for the Martin 
Luther King observance. 

Greeters will be Vivian 
Miller and Bea Siddens. A 
fellowship time will follow 
the worship service in the 
Allen Parlor. 

The Bible Study group 
will meet Sunday at 8:30 
a.m. in the parish house. 
Child care is provided for 
infants and toddlers during 
the worship hour. 



Guest Speaker Sunday 
At United Methodist 



Darrell Huddleston, 
New England Regional 
Director of Heifer Project 
International will be guest 
speaker at the 10 a.m. 
worship service Sunday at 
Quincy Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St. 

Judith Johnson will give 
the Young Disciples 
message. Scripture reader 
will be Robert Schaffer. 
Greeters will be Virginia 
Hawes and Esther Paulsen. 



Ushers will be Margaret 
Buckley and Gloria Tirrell. 

Hostesses at the 
fellowship hour following 
the service will be PhyUis 
Hawes, Olga Hawkins and 
Margery Rund. During tfiat 
time, Heifer Project 
representatives will 
present goats and kids for 
the church youth to pet as 
well as a video and color 
slides to illustrate the 
activities of their program. 



12 Residents Involved 
In Don Bosco Projects 



Twelve Quincy 

residents are among the 
141 seniors at Don Bosco 
High School who must 
complete SO hours of 
■ volunteer work. 

The work is mandatory 
for all Tech seniors and 
goes hand-in-haiKl with the 
Social Justice course they 
will take this year. 

Quincy students and 
their projects are: Michael 
P. Kelly, Brian E. 
Connolly, Thomas M. 
Kavanagh, Thomas M. 
Piotrowski, and Paul 
Lynch, all freshman 
orientation (welcoming 
new students to the 
school); Brian J. Jennette, 
assisting in operation of a 
gym at The Salvation 
Army; William J. 
Cos grove and Anthony 
Repucci, both Don Bosco 
retreats; Terrence Gaide 
and Robert S. McGann, 



both New England 
Medical Center; Mark A. 
McGillicuddy and Sean M. 
Murray, both helping with 
the after school program in 
reading, art, and other 
projects at St. Ann's 
School. 

Projects include parish 
and hospital work, soup 
kitchens, shelters for the 
homeless, boys and girls 
clubs and nursing homes. 
They began Dec. 1 and 
must be completed by 
March. Students make 
their own choices as to 
where they fulfill their 
requirements. 

A project must "he 
verified arid signed by the 
project supervisor and a 
reUgion education teacher. 
The program is conducted 
under the direction of Fr. 
Anthony Luongo, SDB, 
chairman of the ReUgious 
Education Department. 



Community Partnerships 
Accepting Head Start, 

Preschool Applications 



Community 
Partnerships for 

Children/Head Start is 
accepting applications for 
3 and 4 year old children 
who reside in Quincy for a 
preschool program 
beginning in February. 
Children with special 
needs are accepted. 

The program operates 
five days a week with full 
and part-time hours 
available. Hours of 
operation are from 7:15 
a.m. to 6 p.m. 



Transportation is available 
for all part-day children. 
Limited transportation is 
available for full-day 
children. 

The program is geared 
to meet the needs of low- 
income families, working 
families and families 
meeting other guidelines. 

Tuition is based on 
sliding fee scale. 

For an application or 
more information, call 
848-8142. 



•Stress* Workshop 
At Sons Of Italy Hall 



Dr. Barry Freedman, a 
Quincy chiropractor and 
adjunct professor of 
nutrition at Massassoit 
Community College, will 
present a free workshop, 



"Stress: The Causes and 
Cures" Wednesday, Jan. 
27 at 8 p.m. at the Sons of 
Italy HaU, 120 Quany St. 

For information and 
reservations call 472-4220. 



13 Residents Receive 
Northeastern Degrees 



St. Ann School 
Registration Feb. 4 



St. Ann School, 1 St. 
Arm Rd., Wollaston will 
hold registration for the 
school year 1993-1994 for 
Pre-K and Grades K-8 
Thursday, Feb. 4 from 9 



II SUBSCRIPTION FORM 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRiPTfON BLANK AND MAIL TO 






1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 



CITY- 



.STATE- 



ZIP- 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



L. 



( ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE 



$12.00 
$14.00 
$17.00 



( ) CHECK ENCLOSED 
( ) PLEASE BILL ME 



ajn. to i p.m. and 6 to 8 
pjn. 

Registration fee is $50 
per family. A copy of the 
child's birth certificate, 
baptismal certificate and 
medical records are 
necessary. School records 
are required for Grades 2-8. 

Tanya Kutasz 
Merit Semi-Finalist 

Tanya Kutasz, a senior 
at North Quincy High 
School, is a semifinalist in 
the National Merit 
Sdiolarship Program. 



Thirteen Quincy 
residents recently 
graduated from 

Northeastern University. 

They are: 

Sandra Cohen, 1055 
Southern Artery, master of 
health professions; Eileen 
M. Duarte, 1397 Furnace 
Brook Parkway, bachelor 
of science in electrical 
engineering; Michael T. 
Healy, 11 Elcott Rd., 
master of science in civil 
ei J xneering; Yasser M.M. 
Ismail, 151 Sea St., doctor 
of philosophy; Robbyn L. 
Leach, 5 Edwards St., 
master of science in 
criminal justice; Kevin 
Ng, 9 Birch St., bachelor 



of arts. 

Ghulam Sadiq, 135 
Quincy Ave., associate in 
science; Turki M. Said, 
126 Bufler Rd., bachelor of 
science in civil 
engineering; Ellen M. 
Sinnott, 149 Rockland St., 
master of science; James 
Gallagher, 10 Weston 
Ave., master of business 
administration; Leroy 
Hammerstrom, 23 East 
Elm Ave., doctor of 
philosophy; Mary Ei^ 
Ahearn, 115 West 
Squantum St., master of 
science; Ching Ho Cheng, 
95 West Squantum St., 
master of science in 
electrical engineering. 



Four Residents Complete 
Tufts Dentral Program 



scorers nationally with ^^^^ ^o° Bosco 
outstanding academic Technical High School 
potential, only about ^students from Quincy have 

completed a program at 



J 



15,000 (the top scorers in 
each of the 50 states) will 
be honored as 

semifii]alists. 



Tufts Dental School in 
Boston. 

They are: Justin R. 
Whitman, Mamahed 
Nahas, Mark P. Lukasik 
and Christian M. Dunner. 



Dental students advised 
the Tech students on 
nutrition and preventative 
dentistry. 

The program, which has 
been in operation for nine 
years, was coordinated by 
Bemadette Fitzgerald, the 
Don Bosco school nurse. 



« 

I 



Sun Sports 



Thanday, Janoaty 14, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 17 



/ 



Hockey 



North Runs 
Win Streak To 5 



Karen C ashman On 
USA- World Speedskating Team 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The North Quincy 
hockey team continued to 
roll last Saturday as it 
defeated Plymouth, 6-3, at 
the Quincy Youth Arena 
and improved to 6-1. 

North Quincy faced a 
major test last night when 
it faced Weymouth at the 
Pilgrim Arena in Hingham, 
will host Bridgewater- 
Raynham Saturday at 7 
p.m. at the Youth Arena 
and will meet Quincy in 
what should be one of the 
season's best games next 
Wednesday at 7:00. 

North came out flying 
against Plymouth, which 
had been picked to win the 
Old Colony League title 

but it only 4-4, and rolled 
to a 5-1 lead after two 
periods. 

Coach Tom Benson, 
who has many sophomores 
on his North squad, had a 
chance to use his third and 
fourth lines and give them 
some experience. 

The game was a 
physical one and 22 
penalties were called, but 



the Raiders kept their cool 
and outplayed the Blue 
Eagles throughout the 
contest. 

"We have been playing 
well in every department," 
said Benson. "We are 
skating well, playing 
aggressive hockey, and 
getting off a lot of shots. 
Sean Connelly has been 
playing well in goal and 
the defense has been 
strong." 

Mike DesRoche, who 
has 19 points on 12 goals 
and seven assists, had 
another good game with 
two goals and an assist. 
Jim Sapienza, who had 
also scored well, added 
two goals and an assist, 
and A.J. Carthas and 
Andrew Vermette had a 
goal apiece. 

Vermette and John 
Gladu had two assists 
apiece and Carthas one. 

Connelly had another 
excellent game in goal. 

Earlier last week North 
blanked Silver Lake, 2-0, 
with Connelly having 
another outstanding game. 



He had 19 saves, including 
some spectacular ones as 
North recorded its second 
shutout of the sea.son. 

"Sean played the way I 
expected he'd play and in 
the end he was the 
difference in the game," 
Benson said. 

North played a physical 
game, kept the puck in the 
Laker end for the better 
part of the first period and 
dominated every phase of 
the game except scoring 
as Laker goaUe Brian Cole 
turned aside several good 
scoring chances. 

Dave Pacino scored 
North's first goal at 10:37 
of the opening period with 
Lee Hughes having an 
assist. 

The Raiders scored 
their second goal in the 
second period when 
DesRoche scored after 
making a pass from 
Brendan O'Brien. 

The Lakers had three 
excellent scoring 
opportunities but Connelly 
came up with fine saves to 
rob Greg Owen and Mike 
Crowell. 



Karen Cashman, a 1989 
North Quincy High 
graduate and a Northern 
Michigan University 
student, won a spot on the 
five-member USA World 
Short Track Speedskating 
team. 

She competed last 
week in Holland, was third 
in the 500-meter and also 
was on the winning relay 
team. 

In Belgium, along with 
150 other skaters, she 
completed in the Sylvester 
Cup meet and placed third 
in the 1000 meters and 
second in the 3000 meter 
relay. The U. S. relay 
team's time was second to 
the U.S. Olympic record. 

Cashman will continue 
her training and beginning 
in January will be 
traveling and competing in 
Lake Placid, France, 
Norway and at the World 




University 



KAREN CASHMAN 

Games in Poland. 



Quincy-North Football 
Hall Of Fame Meeting Jan. 26 



Quincy Comes From 
Behind For 5-5 Tie 



The Quincy hockey 
team came from behind 
and tied Falmouth, 5-5, 
last Saturday at Falmouth 
on Jeff Craig's goal with 
30 seconds to play. 

It was the Presidents' 
fifth straight game without 
a loss (three wins and two 
ties) and improved their 
record to 5-5-2, their best 
start in some time. 

Quincy played 

Barnstable Tuesday night, 
will play Silver Lake 
Saturday at 6:15 at the 
Hobomock Rink in 
Pembroke and will face 
North Quincy next 
Wednesday at 7:00 at the 
Quincy Youth Arena in 
what should be one of the 
best games of the season. 

Jim Schatzl and Sean 
McArdle assisted on 
Craig's game-tying goal 
which came minutes after 
Schatzl's goal. McArdle 
assisted on that goal. 



Schatzl had another 
goal and Derek Mullen 
and Dan Morrell had the 
other goals. 

Schatzl and McArdle 
had other assists as did 
David Cooper and Steve 
Miller. 

Sophomore Mark Smith 
contributed to play well in 
goal and had 26 saves. 

"I was very pleased at 
the way we fought back 
and tied the game," said 
coach Bob Sylvia. "It is 
very difficult to play 
Falmouth down there; they 
have a very noisy crowd. It 
was a physical game. Dan 
Morrell continues to play 
strong defense. He is very 
physical but doesn't play 
dirty; he just hits hard and 
he has been a staiKlout all 
season. 

"I was worried at the 
start of the year about how 
we would score but we 
have scored better than we 



have in several seasons." 
(The Presidents are 
averaging five goals a 
game with Craig having 22 
points on 15 goals and 
seven assists, Schatzl 22 
points on seven goals and 
15 assists and McArdle 16 



The Quincy-North 
Quincy Football Hall of 
Fame will meet Tuesday, 
Jan. 26 at 7 p.m. at the 
Granite Rail, 16 Cottage 
Ave., Quincy Center. 

The highlight of the 
meeting will be the 
viewing of the fihn of the 
Thanksgiving Day game. 

At the Dec. 8 meeting 
the Hall voted on some 
exciting innovations 
intended to smooth out the 
planning of the activities 
and to seek more 
community support. 

Several committees 
were established, 
including a trophy 
committee comprised of 
North's Fred Cobban, Ray 



Mahoney and Ken 



, ,„ Doherty, John Pettinelli, 
points on six goals and 10 Tom Kiley, John "Butch" 
assists). 

Earlier in the week 
Craig had a hat trick to 
lead Quincy over 
Plymouth, 6-4. 

McArdle, Morrell, and 
sophomore Cooper had the 
other goals. 

Schatzl had three 
assists and Cooper, Mark 
Gilmore and Steve Barrett 
one each. 

Smith had another good 
night in goal with several 
excellent saves. 



McPhee and Quincy's 
Lionel "Shine" Buckley, 
Len Picot, Turk Beston, 
Jim Colclough, Lou Volpe, 
Jack Raymer and Bill 
Sullivan. 

A sponsorship 

committee comprised of 
Kiley, Raymer and 
Mahoney, was formed to 
enlist the support of local 
community groups to 
underwrite the cost of 
banquet tickets for the 
seniors. 

The committee will 
contact organizations such 
as the Elks, Rotary, 
Kiwanis, American 
Legion, South Quincy 
Bocce Club, and local 
businesses. 

A banquet committee 
was organized to formalize 
Jerry Perfetuo's long- 



standing practice of 
planning the annual 
banquet. Fran Lacey joins 
Perfetuo on the annual 
banquet committee. 

An ad book committee 
made up of Dan McPhee, 
Picot and Buckley will 
solicit Quincy residents 
and businesses to purchase 
space in the ad book. The 
ad book is currently the 
only independent source of 
fiinds for the banquet and 
scholarships. 

Colclough, Lacey and 
Cobban are going to 
organize some summer 
events. Under discussion 
are a sofiball game and-or 
golf tournament. 

Any member seeking 
further information is 
asked to call secretary Ed 
Vena at 737-8700. 



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Shea B.C. High Athletic 
Hall Of Fame Inductee 



Dan Shea of Quincy 
was recently inducted into 
the Boston College High 
School Athletic Hall of 
Fame. 

Shea, 27, scored 124 
points as a hockey player 
fi^om 1981-84 and is the 
school's all-time leading 
scorer. He was captain of 
the 1984 team. 



Shea received a full 
scholarship to Boston 
College where he became 
the Eagles' fourth-leading 
scorer of all-time and 
captained the 1987-88 
team. Shea scored 66 
goals and had 124 assists 
in his Eagle career aiKl is 
still their fifth-leading 
scorer of all-time. 



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Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 14, 1993 



Wrestling 



Quincy Pins Plymouth 



Basketball 



Quincy's wrestling 
team, which has bounced 
back after a slow start, 
opened its Old Colony 
League schedule with a 
49-21 victory over 
Plymouth, improving to 4- 
5. 

The Presidents will host 
Hingham this Saturday 
morning at 10 o'clock. 

Junior Co-Capt. Ashley 
Davis (145) improved his 
record to 9-0 in dual meets 
and placed sixth in the 
prestigious Lowell 



Tournament and fourth in 
the Sanford, Me., 
Tournament. 

Sophomore 
heavyweight Mike Feeley 
improved to 6-0 in dual 
meets and took home a 
fourth place medal in 
Sanford. Junior Peter 
Penwaiden (125) also won 
a medal by finishing sixth 
in Sanford. 

Quincy finished fourth 
in the eight-team Pittsfield 
dual meet tournament, 
upsetting top-seeded 



Quabben in the first round, 
33-22, then bowing to 
Carver and Wellesley in 
later rounds. 

Winners for Quincy's 
'Men at Work' were 
freshman Mark Froehlich 
(112), sophomore Matt 
Miller (125), Penwarden 

(130), senior Damien 
Carini (140), sophomore 
Bryan Gallahue (145), 
Davis (152) and Feeley 
(heavyweight). 



North Girls Win 
Third In Row 



Girls Volleyball Clinic Jan. 17 



Jim Rendle, coach of 
the three-time 

Massachusetts Div. 1 state 
champion North Quincy 
girls' volleyball team, will 
conduct an instructional 
volleyball clinic for girls 
in the sixth, seventh and 
eighth grades Sunday, Jan. 
17 from 2 to 4 p.m. at the 



North Quincy High gym. 

The clinic is sponsored 
in part by the Mass. Jr. 
Olympic Volleyball 
Program and the cost is $5. 

This introduction in the 
fundamentals of volleyball 
is designed to give the 
beginner player a basic 
understanding of skills and 



strategies of the game. 

It will also introduce 
the players to the Mass. Jr. 
Program, a rapidly 
growing, highly successful 
development program for 
young women. 

For more information 
caU Rendle at 773-8522. 



Sacred Heart Basketball 



By JOE HERN 

The results of the 
Sacred Heart North Quincy 
Basketball League games 
during the second week of 
the season: 

Rookie Boys (8-10): 
The Jaehnig Squad 
defeated the Bulls, 22-11, 
led by Brian Cyr and 
David Jaehnig, who 
combined for nearly every 
Jaehnig basket and had 
five steals, and Alan Lee, 
who scored his first career 
point. The Bulls were 
sparked by the two-way 
play of Bruce Maggio, the 
defense of Derek Keezer 
and the scoring of Joslin 
Adler. 

The Hawks rolled over 
St. Ann's Team Sleeth, 34- 
14, sparked by the 
shooting of Phil 
McGillicuddy, the defense 
of Neal Gavin and the 
solid play of Ron Leung. 
St. Ann's was led by 
Brandon Deshler's defense 
and Matt Miller and 
Patrick Ryder, who 
showed good hustle. 

The Magic topped 
Team Liuzzo, 27-4, with 
eight players sharing in the 
scoring. Adam O'Hara 
rebounded and passed 
well, Sean Bowes played 
strong defense and scored 
a crowd-pleasing hoop and 
Kieran Ryan had many 
steal and scored 10 points 
for the Magic. Jackie 
Liuzzo, Jeff Nardone and 
Tom Buckley played well 
for Liuzzo. 

Sacred Heart 

McFariane edged St. Ann's 
HoUeran, 21-18. St. Ann's 
fell behind early but fought 
back in the third quarter 
paced by Kevin Holleran, 
Sean Ginty and Steve 
Purcell. 

The Hurricanes 



defeated the Donovan 
team, 21-16, with Kenny 
Lee playing strong 
defense, Bela Kabnago 
rebounding well and Tom 
Whitman playing a strong 
game. 

Repoff overpowered 
MacFarlane, despite the 
gutsy performance of Pat 
Dolbeare, the defense of 
Ryan Hutchins and the 
ball handling of Steve 
Minuskas. 

Rookie Girls (8-10): 
The Ptak squad edged 
Team Murphy, 15-12, 
paced by Rose Zerrigan's 
dominance of the boards, 
the passing of Charlene 
Cote and the defense of 
April Supiey. For Murphy, 
Alicia Bell had eight 
points. Shannon O'Donnell 
rebounded well and scored 
four points and Carolyt 
Francis excelled or 
defense. 

The Doyle Team 
toppled the McGrath 
Team, 17-12, pulling out 
front in the first half and 
staving off a strong 
comeback bid in the 
second. McGrath was led 
by the rebounding and 
scoring of Jessica Crehan, 
the ballhandling of Diane 
Lynch and the defense of 
Melissa Clifford, who 
forced numerous turnovers. 

Manning-Hanna 
defeated the Magic, 14-6, 
led by the shooting of 
Kathlyn Gates. Kim 
Dennis played fine defense 
and Manny Hanna had a 
solid two-way game. Tara 
Ridge passed well for the 
Magic, Alyssa Hawksley 
played good defense and 
Liz Furlong had two 
baskets. 

College Boys (11-12): 
St. Ann's Deshler defeated 



the Stoekel Squad, 23-12, 
led by the scoring of Adam 
Goodrich, the solid 
rebounding and defense of 
Bardal Haisanas and the 
passing of Brian Deshler. 
Stoekel narrowed the gap 
in the third quarter with 
four baskets. Sean 
Jafarzadeh played 
aggressive defense for 
Stoekel, Sean Cote made 
some excellent shots and 
Dan Lee did some fine 
passing in the clutch. 

Duke roUed to a 30-13 
decision as Mike Buckley, 
Randy Feetham and Jim 
Fitzgerald led the way. 

College Girls (11-12): 
Georgetown bested Notre 
Dame, 18-12, with a late 
six-point surge. Barbara 
Ryan did some fine 
ballhandling and played 
strong defense, Rachel 
O'Hara was tough under 
the boards and Lauren 
Liuzzo had some clutch 
points. Marcy Hern had 
some key rebounds for 
Notre Dame and forced 
several turnovers, Katie 
Cadogan played well at 
forward and Kristen Bowes 
handled the ball well and 
played a fine all-around 
game. 

Pro Boys (12-14): The 

Celtics stung the Hornets, 
36-19, after surviving a 13- 
point first quarter by the 
Hornets. John Heims was 
the top scorer for the 
Celtics, Frank McNamara 
played strong defense and 
Kevin Bowes made the big 
rebounds. For the Hornets 
Pat McDonough scored 19 
points, Shawn Donovan 
rebounded well and 
controlled the offense and 
Mike Sullivan contributed 
four points and solid 
rebounding. 



Quincy's Mite C 
hockey team Hyde Park, 



Mite Cs Win 

and Jordan Virtue scoring 
two goals apiece. 



4-1, with Mathew Conso Virtue, Bruce Maggio, 



Peter Turowski and Kenny 
Reichel has assists and 
Joey Fitzpatrick played 
well in goal. 



The North Quincy girls' 
basketball team, off to a 
slow start, but playing well 
lately, last Friday defeated 
Weymouth, 44-31, for its 
third win in a row, 
improving its record to 4-4. 

The North girls played 
at Bridgewater-Raynham 
Tuesday, will host Quincy 



tonight (Thursday) at 7 
o'clock and will be home 
to Plymouth next Tuesday 
at 5:30. 

Freshman Sara Stanton 
led North to its last two 
victories. Friday she 
scored 13 points to lead 
the way over Weymouth. 
Senior Regina Murphy had 



1 1 points for North. 

Earlier in the week 
Stanton had her best game 
of the season as she scored 
25 points and added 10 
rebounds in a 47-34 victory 
over Taunton. 

Maureen McCarthy 
played a key role in the 
win as she had 10 assists. 



Youth Hockey Jamboree 



Granite Squirt House 
Winner In Overtime 



Granite Auto, which is 
in last place in the league 
standings, edged Johnson 
Motor Parts, 5-4, on Mike 
Welch's overtime goal to 
win the Squirt House 
League jamboree. 

Dan Kennedy had a hat 
trick for Granite Auto and 
Ryan Doyle a goal. Welch 
had three assists and Frank 
Curreri, Nick Pizziferri 
and Pat O'Donnell had 
assists. Shane Kabilian 
bad two goals and Paul 
Markarian and Joe Thorley 
one each for Johnson. 



Steve King had two assists 
and Thorley, Mark Doyle 
and Tom Gouthro one 
each. 

The semifinals provided 
two excellent games as 
Granite Auto edged The 
Quincy Sun, 7-6, and 
Johnson got by Green 
Environmental, 4-3. 

Curreri scored the 
winning goal for Granite 
Auto in a shootout. 
Pizziferri, Kennedy and 
Welch had two goals each 
and Shaun Cheney and 
Curreri had assists. Ashley 



Rowerdink scored twice 
and Mike Carloni, Sean 
Haidul, Kevin Mason and 
Joe Watson once each for 
the Sun and Sean Adams, 
Mason, Joey Ardagna and 
Dave Noonan had assists. 

Markarian had two 
goals and Chris Carthas 
and Jon Healy one each 
for Johnson, Carthas had 
two assists and Markarian 
and Doyle one each. 
Andrew Nestor had two 
goals and Mike Whalen 
one for Green and Matt 
Gibbons had two assists. 



Neponset Edges Harold 
For Mite House Crown 



Neponset Valley Survey 
edged the Paul Harold 
Club, 3-2, to win the Mite 
House League jamboree. 
Neponset Valley is 
coached by Bill 
Richardson and Jim Conso. 

Kevin Richardson had 
two goals and Steven Goff 
one. Mike Manganaro, 
Casey Winter and Pat 
Lahar had assists. Matt 
Holt and Matt Gregory 
scored for Harold Club and 



Tom Hughes and Briai. 
Stock had assists. 

In the semifinals Harold 
edged Lydon-Russell, 4-3, 
and Neponset Valley 
defeated Campbell Auto 
Service, 5-1. 

Stock scored the 
winning goal for Harold in 
a shootout and Rene 
Lumaghini, Colin Maxey 
and Holt had the other 
goals. Lumaghini had an 
assist. Jimmy Cashins, 



Steve Summering and 
Scott MacDonald scored f 
for Lydon and Jon 
Paquette, John Ryan and 
Brian Lynch had assists. 

Shawn Richardson had 
two goals and Winter, 
Chris Sheehan, and Conso * 
one each for Neponset 
Valley and Reichel, Kevin 
Richardson and Lahar had 
assists. Paul Flynn scored 
Campbell's goal with Matt 
Miller assisting. 



Colonial Shocks Morrissey 
Club For Pee Wee Title 



Colonial Federal, in 
last place in the league 
standings, shocked first 
place Morrissey Gub, 5-2, 
to win the Pee Wee House 
jamboree. 

Andre Nagy, Mike 
Struzik, Robbie Winter, 
Billy Graney and Jimmy 
Hasson had the Colonial 
Federal goals and Chris 
Haidul had two assists and 



Sean Fitzgerald, Hasson 
and Nagy one each. Brian 
Gates had both Morrissey 
goals and Bobby Harvey 
assisted on both. 

In the semifinals 
Colonial Federal edged 
Keohane's, while 
Morrissey drew a bye. 

Graney scored the 
winning time after 
Keohane's overcame a 3-0 



deficit to send the game 
into overtime. 

Fitzgerald, Nagy and 
Paul McCarthy had the 
other goals and Billy 
Norris and Struzik had 
assists. Mike Fitzpatrick, 
Josh Silverman and Carlos 
Ashmanakas scored for 
Keohane's and Mark 
Foster had an assist. 



Lydon, Campbell Win 



Lydon-Russell blanked 
Purdy's Ice Cream, 8-0, in 
Mite House League action 
with goalie Jimmy Cashins 
recording the shutout. 

Jordan Virtue had a hat 
trick and Bryan Petit, 
Matthew Petit, Jon 
Tallent, Ryan Donahue 
and Jon Paquette a goal 
each. Tallent had two 
assists and Matthew Petit, 
Donahue, and Paquette 
one each. 

Granite Rail Pizza 
topped Neponset Valley 
Survey, 5-2, with Josh 
Giordani and Brian Lewis 



scoring two goals each and 
Kevin Patten one. Tommy 
Curran, Bill McKeon and 
Lewis had assists. Patrick 
Lahar and Kevin 
Richardson scored for 
Neponset Valley and 
Casey Winter had an 
assist. 

Campbell's Auto 
Service defeated Barry's 
Defi, 4-2, on goals by Matt 
Miller, Joe Callahan, Sean 
Moriarty and Paul Flynn. 
John Chevalier, Flynn, and 
Matt Alleva had assists. 
Jeff Hunt and Andy Ross 



scored for Barry's with 
Kris Farr having an assist. 

Ryan Barry's hat trick 
led the Paul Harold Club 
to a 7-5 victory over 
Samoset Pharmacy. Mark 
Tetreault and Matt 
Gregory had a goal apiece. 
Brian Stock had two 
assists and Mike Doyle 
and Matt Langille one 
each. Steve McGonagle 
had two goals and Patrick 
Casper, Shaun Flaherty 
and Richard Stone one 
each for Samoset and 
Mike Cox had an assist. 



m 



Thursday, January 14, 1993 Qulncy Sun Page 19 



Basketball 



Blocked Shot Gives 
Quincy 63-62 Victory 



John Russell was the 
hero as the Quincy boys' 
basketball team squeezed 
Barnstable, 63-62, last 
Friday to improve its 
record to 3-5. 

The President played at 
Silver Lake Tuesday, will 
host North Quincy Friday 
night at 7 and will be 
home to Taunton next 
Tuesday night at 7. 

With Quincy leading by 



a point, Russell, senior 
center, blocked a 
Barnstable shot with six 
seconds left and the 
Presidents held on for the 
wirL 

Russell had his best 
game of the season with 
14 points and 1 1 rebounds, 
Robbie Kane, who has had 
an outstanding year, had 
14 points and five steals 
and Tom Malvesti had 



another stellar game with 
11 points and nine 
rebounds. 

Barnstable's Mike Fein 
kept his team in the game 
with 25 points. 

"The boys played an 
excellent game and that 
was an outstanding 
defensive play by 
Russell," said Quincy 
coach John Franceschini. 

Earlier in the week the 



Presidents had a woeful 
night at the free throw line 
and it cost them a 61-57 
defeat at the hands of 
Falmouth. 

Quincy missed 21 of 35 
free throws which proved 
fatal. 

Kane had 14 points and 
Malvesti added 13 but the 
Presidents trailed, 39-31, 
at the half and never could 
catch up. 



North Drops Squeaker 
To Weymouth, 45-44 




DEREK COLANTONIO 



The North Quincy boys' 
basketball team started off 
well but things haven't 
been going well lately and 
last Friday the Raiders 
dropped a 45-44 squeaker 
to Weymouth for their 
third loss in a row, 
dropping their record to 4- 

5. 

North played 

Bridgewater-Raynham 
Tuesday night, will be at 
Quincy Friday night at 7 
o'clock and will play at 
Plymouth next Tuesday at 
5:30. 



Swimming 



The Raiders trailed by 
six points with a minute to 
play and Sean Donovan 
scored a basket and Luke 
Sheets hit a three-pointer 
to bring them within a 
point but they couldn't pull 
out a win. 

The loss was especially 
disappointing to North 
coach Ted Stevenson, who 
said at the start of the 
season he felt the Raiders 
would do better than last 
year. 

However, they already 
have lost as many games 



as they did all last year 
when they were 15-5 and 
qualified for the Eastern 
Mass. Tournament. 

Sheets had 15 points 
and Donovan 14 for North 
against Weymouth. Tri- 
Captains Sheets, Donovan 
and Bo Smith have been 
scoring consistently all 
season for the Raiders. 

Weymouth's Mark 
Harrington had a big night 
with 16 points and 11 
rebounds, while Alex 
MacPhee chipped in with 



1 1 points. 

Earlier in the week 
North lost another 
heartbreaker to Taunton, 
78-75. 

Donovan led the 
Raiders with 20 points and 
11 rebounds while Smith 
had 17 points and Sheets 
bad 16 points and 10 
rebounds. 

North couldn't stop 
Taunton's John Martin, 
who scored 31 points, 
while Keith Aldridge had 
20 for the Tigers. 



Wrestling 



Colantoiiio Plymouth 
State Key Member 



Derek Colantonio of 
Quincy is a key member of 
the highly-rated 1992-93 
Plymouth State College 
Panther wrestling team. 

He is a 1991 graduate 
of North Quincy High 
School. 

Colantonio wrestles in 



the 118-pound weight class 
for PSC, which moved 
near the top of the New 
England rankings after 
opening its season with 
wins over highly-regarded 
teams from Boston 
College, Worcester Tech, 
and Rhode Island College. 



Bob Seamans To 'Ski For Sight' 



North Boys Win 
Third Straight 



The North Quincy boys' 
swim team won its third 
meet in a row, defeating 
Nauset, 90-86. North had 
only 13 swimmers as 
compared with 37 for 
Nauset. 

North hosts Taunton 
today (Thursday) at 3:30 
p.m. at the Lincoln- 
Hancock School pool. 
Next Tuesday the Red 
Raiders will be at Milford 
at 4 p.m. 

Personal bests were 



turned in by almost every 
member of the North team 
in a meet which came 
down to the final relay 
with North taking second 
place to clinch the victory. 
Jim Raherty won both 
the 200 and 500 freestyles, 
Barry Canavan won the 
200 individual medley and 
placed second in the 100 
breaststroke, Mike PI oof 
won the 100 backstroke 
and took second in the 100 
butterfly and Alan Morse 



won the diving. 

Erik Delorey took 
second in the 50 and 100 
freestyle and Erik Oster 
took second in the 500 
fi^eestyle. 



Dan 
Terrence 



Bermingham, 
Roche, Shawn 



Bob Seamans of Quincy 
will take part in a 24-hour 
Cross Country Ski-A-Thon, 
Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 
27 and 28 at Waterville 
Valley, N.H., to benefit 
The Carroll Center for the 
Blind. 

Seamans, who intends 
to ski for 24 straight hours, 
invites others to join him if 
only for a few miles. His 
wife June will ski a few 
miles during the event. He 
is a member of the board 



Burke, William Lee, Greg of directors of The Carroll 

Mackay, Andrew Kramer Center for the Bhnd. 

and John Marinilli also Skiers are presently 

swam well. seeking pledges-per-mile 



from individuals and 
organizations. To make a 
pledge contact Arthur 
O'Neill at the Carroll 
Center, 969-6200. The 
Carroll Center is a tax- 
exempt charitable 
corporation. 

The Carroll Center for 
the Blind provides 
comprehensive rehab- 
ilitation services to newly 
blinded adults and other 
visually impaired persons, 
enabling them to achieve 
independence, self- 
sufficiency, and self 
fulfillment. 



Sports and entertain- 
ment personalities are 
expected at the event 
which will be held on an 
easy one-mile, double- 
track flat loop for conven- 
tional and skating styles. 

Raffle prizes will be 
awarded to skiers seeking 
pledges and long sleeve l- 
shirts will be presented to 
all participants. 



@ United Way 

^^^^ II bringi Hullhf hesi m all of us. 



Walker Wins B.U. 
Freshman Award 



Boston University 
freshman wide receiver 
Chris Walker, a former 
All-Scholastic football 
player at Quincy High 
School, has been honored 
for his play during the 
Terriers' 1992 season. 

Walker received the 
Patemo Award as the most 
valuable freshman on the 
team. 

The 5'11", 169-pound 
Walker finished the season 
as B.U.'s fourth-leading 
receiver with 18 receptions 
for 226 yards and a 
touchdown. His totals 
came in six of the team's 
11 games. 

He did not catch his 
first pass until the fifth 
game of the year, his first 
start, at Delaware. In that 



game he caught four 
passes for 81 yards and a 
touchdown. He also had 
five receptions against 
Rhode Island. 

"Chris is an outstanding 
prospect for us," said head 
coach Dan Allen. "He had 
an excellent freshman 
season, and we are looking 
forward to his becoming 
one of the top receivers 
not just in the Yankee 
Conference but in Division 
1-AA football." 

At Quincy High School, 
Walker was a standout 
receiver, averaging 23 
yards a catch during his 
senior year. He was a 
Patriot Ledger All- 
Scholastic, an Old Colony 
League All-Star, and 
played in the 1992 
Shriners All-Star Game. 



Quincy, North Winter 
Home Sports Schedule 



Jan. 13 thru Jan. 19 



Wednesday, Jan. 13 

• QHS hockey vs. Barnstable, 5:30 varsity, 
7:50 JV. 

• QHS wrestling vs. Weymouth, 7:00. 

Thursday, Jan. 14 

• QHS-NQHS girls basketball @ North, 3:30 
freshman, 5:30 JV, 7:00 V. 

Friday, Jan. 15 

• QHS vs. NQHS boys basketball @ Quincy, 
3:30 freshman, 5:30 JV, 7:00 V. 

Saturday, Jan. 16 

• NQHS hockey vs. Bridgewater/Raynham, 
6:40 JV, 7:50V. 

• Wrestling, NQHS @ Quincy vs. Hingham, 10 

a.m. 

Tuesday, Jan. 19 

• QHS boys basketball vs. Taunton, 3:30 
freshman, 5:30 JV, 7:00 V. 

• NQHS girls basketball vs. Plymouth, 4:00 
freshman (Atlantic); 4:00 JV and 5:30 V. 




by Tony Centorino, Bill Starkie and Kevin McGroarty 

QUALITATIVE CHANGE FOR THE BETTER 



Anyone who believes that 
they do not build cars like 
they used to may want to take 
another look. For a quality 
comparison between old cars 
and new, take a look at the life 
expectancy of the engine, 
which is the heart of any car. 
The average passenger car 
of the early 1950's could ex- 
pect to travel about 45,000 
miles before needing an en- 
gine rebuild. Some 40 years 
later, engine life expectancy 
has more than doubled to 
100,000 miles, and more. 
What technologkal advances 
have made this possible? 
Today's engines utilize better 
positive crankcase ventilation, 
higher operating tempera- 
tures, and unleaded gas to 
reduce corrosive crankcase 
acids. Fuel injection has 
practically eliminated cases 



of raw gasoline washing down 
cdd cylinder walls. In addi- 
tion, engine oil is vastiy im- 
proved. 

HINT: Other factors con- 
tributing to the longer engine 
life of today's cars are im- 
proved materials and ma- 
chining. 

Call 843-1550, LEO & 
WALTS SUNOCO for an ap- 
pointment if your car is show- 
ing signs of any problem. Our 
technKians are trained to get 
you back on the road safely 
by efficiently and competentiy 
handling the problems that 
may occur. For the best ser- 
vice in town, we're here at 
258 Quincy Ave., E. 
Brainti'ee, 843-1 550. "A Place 
Where Your Car Can Live 
Longer." Mon-Fri 6 am-9 pm, 
Sat 7 am-9 pm. Sun 9 anfi-5 
pm. 



Pa^ 20 Quincy Sun Thnrsday, January 14, 1993 



i^iOALNOTlOi 



:LiQAi,:iiiii: 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 357 

ORDERED: D^embw 21 , 1992 

B« it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, that the Revised Ordinances of the City of 
Qt^y, 1976, as amervJed, are further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXX. Salaries. Section 151. General Salary Classification and 
Wages. 

LOCAL 1139 - LABORERS INTERNATIONAL UNION OF NORTH AMERICA, AFL-CIO 

STRIKE OUT THE FOLLOWING: 

LABORERS LOCAL 1139 

SALARY SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1 , 1 990 



TITLE START FIRST YR SECOND YR 

Blaster 394.11 402.47 411.75 

Bracer 360.01 368.26 376.51 

BkJg. MainL Man 385.49 393.95 402.46 

BIdg Maint. Man MEO 385.49 393.95 402.46 

Carpenter 426.68 436.80 446.95 

Carpenter/Park 

Maint. Man/MEO 481.56 487.18 492.80 

Construction Handyman/ 

BIdg. MainL Man 394.11 402.47 411.75 

Dispatcher 407.23 416.69 426.14 

Electric Station 

Equip. Repairman 23,485. 

Foreman 27,651. 

RE, M.E. Repairman 31,315. 

Gardener 385.49 393.95 

General Foreman 31,315. 

General Fweinan/ 

Timekeeper 32,807. 

Groundskeeper 391.34 399.82 408.35 

Groundsworker 354.20 361.44 368.65 

Head Carpenter 481.56 490.55 499.54 

Head Painter, Equip. 

MainL Spray Painter 495.06 503.66 512.27 

Hwy, Maint Man 362.29 369.91 377.59 

Hwy Maint Craftsman 385.49 393.95 402.46 

Laborer 348.18 357.61 367.04 

Laborer, Hvy MEO 

Tree Climber 385.49 393.95 40^.46 

Laborer, Painter, Pkg 

Meter Repainnan 430.76 438.47 446.28 

Laborer, Pkg Controller 

Special Constable 19,409. 

Mason 481.56 487.18 492.80 

Mechanical Equip 

Repairman 20,093. 

Mechanical 

Handyman 348.18 357.61 367.04 

Mechannal Handyman/ 

Tree Climber 368.77 375.60 382.42 

Meter Reader 371.81 381.92 392.04 

Motor Equipment 

Maint Man 394.11 402.47 411.75 

Motor Eqiipment 

Operator, Laborer 371.81 381.92 392.04 

MEO-Heavy I 407.23 416.69 426.14 

Heavy II 418.46 428.57 438.69 

MEO-Heavy II Tree 

Climber 418.46 428.57 438.69 

MEO-Special 481.56 487.18 492.80 

Motor Equipment 

Repairman I 411.88 435.47 459.07 

Motor Equipment 

Repairman II 495.06 503.66 512.27 

Painter/Spray 

Painter 426.68 436.80 446.95 

Park Maint Man 391.34 399.82 408.35 

Park Maint Man/ 

Hgy MEO 407.23 416.69 426.14 

Pkg Meter Maint 

Foreman 25,130 

Pipelayer 360.01 368.26 376.51 

Plumber 407.23 416.69 426.14 

Pumping Station 

Attendant 394.11 402.47 411.75 

Pumping Statkm 

Operator 495.06 503.66 512.27 

Senbr Water Service 

Inspector 26,560 27,033. 27,505. 

Signal Maintainer 495.34 534.21 543.30 

Sign Painter 495.34 534.21 543.30 

Tire Repainnan 376.69 384.91 393.13 

Tool Keeper 407.23 416.69 426.14 

TraffK Signal 

& Comm. Tech. 573.88 

Tree Climber 360.01 368.26 376.51 

Water Meter 

Repairman 385.49 393.46 402.46 

Water Service 

Inspector 407.23 416.69 426.14 

Water/Sewer Maint 

Craftsman 418.46 428.57 438.69 

Water/Sewer 

Maint Man 394.11 402.47 411.75 

Water System Junbr 

Craftsman 362.29 369.91 377.59 

Welder 426.68 436.80 446.95 

Working Fore 

Carp 411.88 435.47 459.07 

V\n(g Fore, Gardener 

Hvy MEO 469.97 477.83 485.70 

Wta Foreman, 

Gen. Servfces 411.88 435.47 459.07 
Wkg Fore Highway 

Maint Craftsman 481.56 487.18 492.80 

Wkg Fore. Laborer 420.52 429.97 432.49 

Wkg Foreman, Mason 469.97 477.83 485.70 
Wkg Fore M.E. 

Repair I 25,130. 



THIRD YR 
421.06 
384.73 
410.65 
410.65 
457.06 

498.42 

424.43 
435.60 



24,232. 
28,397. 
32,058. 
402.46 410.65 

32,058. 



33,553. 
416.87 
375.61 
508.53 

520.89 
385.23 
410.65 
376.50 

410.65 

454.07 



482.67 

520.89 

457.06 
416.87 

435.60 

25,879. 
384.73 
435.60 

424.43 

520.89 

27,977. 
552.36 
552.36 
401.28 
435.60 

384.73 

410.65 

435.60 

448.80 

424.43 

385.23 
457.06 

482.67 

493.56 

482.67 

498.42 
448.89 
493.56 

25,879. 



10YRS 
442.59 
406.29 
432.16 
432.16 
478.60 

504.17 

448.21 
457.13 

25.349. 
29,516. 
33,179. 

432.16 
33,179. 

34,672. 
438.31 
397.12 
517.16 

538.10 
406.76 
432.16 
398.01 

432.16 

475.61 



498.42 


20,528. 
504.17 


20,841. 


21,960. 


376.50 


398.01 


389.24 
402.15 


410.76 
414.43 


424.43 


448.21 


402.15 
435.60 
448.80 


414.43 
457.13 
466.30 


448.80 
498.42 


466.30 
504.17 



504.17 

538.10 

478.60 
438.31 

457.13 

26,997. 
406.29 
457.13 

448.21 

538.10 

28,921. 
573.90 
573.90 
422.90 
457.13 

595.42 
406.29 

432.16 

457.13 

466.30 

448.21 

406.76 
478.60 

504.17 

505.92 

504.17 

504.17 
470.42 
505.92 

26,997. 



Wkg Fore M.E 












Repair II 


26,560. 


27,032. 


27,503. 


27,975. 


28,921. 


Pkg Fore Hvy MEO, 












Laborer 


481.56 


487.18 


492.80 


498.42 


504.17 


Wkg Fore Spec MEO 


469.97 


477.83 


485.70 


493.56 


505.92 


Wkg Fore Tire 












Repairman 


481.56 


487.18 


492.80 


498.42 


504.17 


Wkg Fore Tree 












Climber, Laborer 


481.56 


487.18 


492.80 


498.42 


504.17 


Wkg Fore Water 












Meter Repairman 


481.56 


490.55 


499.54 


508.53 


417.16 


Wkg Fore Water/ 












Sewer Maint Craftsman 


481.56 


490.55 


499.54 


508.53 


517.16 


Wkg Fore Water/ 












Sewer Maint Man 


481.56 


487.18 


492.80 


498.42 


504.17 


Wkg Fore Welder 


26,560. 


27,032. 


27,503. 


27,975. 


28,921. 


Yardman 


481.56 


487.18 


492.80 


498.42 


504.17 



AND INSERT THE FOLLOWING: 

LABORERS -LOCAL 1139 
SALARY SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1 , 



1993 



TITLE 

Blaster 

Bracer 

Buikling Maint Man 

BIdg Maint 

Man,MEO 

Carpenter 

Carpenter/Park 

Maint. Man/MEO 

Construction 

Handyman/ 

BIdg Maint Man 

Dispatcher 

Electric Station 

Equip Repainnan 

Foreman 

Foreman, M.E. 

Repairman 

Gardener 

General Foreman 

General Foreman/ 

Timekeeper 

Groundskeeper 

Groundsworker 

Head Carpenter 

Head Painter, 

Equipment 

Mairitenance Spray 

Painter 

Hwy Maint Man 

Hwy Maint Craftsman 

Laborer 

Laborer, Hvy MEO 

Tree Climber 

Laborer, Painter, 

Parking 

Meter Repairman 

Laborer, Parking 

Controller 

Special Constable 

Mason 

Mechanical 

Equip Repairman 

Mechanical 

Handyman 

Mechanical 

Handyman/ 

Tree Climber 

Meter Reader 

Motor Equipment 

Maint Man 

Motor Equip Oper/ 

Laborer 

MEO, Heavy I 

MEO, Heavy II 

MEO-Heavy II, 

Tree Climber 

MEO-Special 

Motor Equip 

Repairmh. 

Motor Equip 
Repairman II 
Painter/Spray 
Painter 
Park 

Maint Man 
Park Maint Man 
Hvy MEO 
Pkg Meter 
Maint Foreman 
Pipelayer 
Rumber 
PumpStatkm 
Attendant 
Pump Station 
Operator 
Senior Water 
Servke Inspector 
Signal Maintainer 
Sign Painter 
Tire Repainnan 
Tool Keeper 
Traffk Signal 
& Comm. Tech. 
Tree CHmber 
Water Meter 
Repairman 



START 
401.99 
367.21 
393.20 

393.20 
435.21 

491.19 



401.99 
415.37 

23,955. 
28,204. 

31,941. 

393.20 
31,941. 

33.463. 
399.17 
361.28 
491.19 



504.96 
369.54 
393.20 
355.14 

393.20 



439.38 



19,797. 
491.19 

20,495. 

355.14 



376.15 
379.25 

401.99 

379.25 
415.37 
426.83 

426.83 
491.19 

420.12 

504.96 

435.21 

399.17 

415.37 

25,633. 
367.21 
415.37 

401.99 

504.96 

27,091 
505.25 
505.25 
384.22 
415.37 

585.36 
367.21 

393.20 



1STYR 
410.52 
375.63 
401.83 

401.83 
445.54 

496.92 



410.52 
425.02 



401.83 



407.82 
368.67 
500.36 



513.73 
377.31 
401.83 
364.76 

401.83 



447.24 



496.92 



364.76 

383.11 
389.56 

410.52 

389.56 
425.02 
437.14 

437.14 
496.92 

444.18 

513.73 
445.54 
407.82 
425.02 

375.63 
425.02 

410.52 

513.73 

27,574. 
544.89 
544.89 
392.61 
425.02 

375.63 
401.33 



2NDYR 
419.99 
384.04 
410.51 

410.51 
455.89 

502.66 



419.99 
434.66 



410.51 



416.52 
376.02 
509.53 



522.52 
385.14 
410.51 
374.38 

410.51 



455.21 



502.66 



374.38 

390.07 
399.88 

419.99 

399.88 
434.66 
447.46 

447.46 
502.66 

468.25 

522.52 
455.89 
416.52 
434.66 

384.04 
434.66 

419.99 

522.52 

28,055. 
554.17 
554.17 
400.99 
434.66 

384.04 
410.51 



3RDYR 
429.48 
392.42 
418.86 

418.86 
466.20 

508.39 



432.92 
444.31 

24,717. 
28,965. 

32,699. 

418.86 
32,699. 

34,224. 
425.21 
383.12 
518.70 



531.31 
392.93 
418.86 
384.03 

418.86 



463.15 

508.39 
21,258. 
384.03 

397.02 
410.19 

432.92 

410.19 
444.31 
457.78 

457.78 
508.39 

492.32 

531.31 

466.20 

425.21 

444.31 

26,397. 
392.42 
444.31 

432.92 

531.31 

28,537. 
563.41 
563.41 
409.31 
444.31 

392.42 
418.86 



10YR 
451.44 
414.42 
440.80 

440.80 
488.17 

514.25 



457.17 
466.27 

25,856. 
30,106. 

33,843. 

440.80 
33,843. 

35,365. 
447.08 
405.06 
527.50 



548.86 
414.90 
440.80 
405.97 

440.80 



485.12 

20,939. 
514.25 

22,399. 

405.97 



418.98 
422.72 

457.17 

422.72 
466.27 
475.63 

475.63 
514.25 

514.25 

548.86 

488.17 

447.08 

466.27 

27,537. 
414.42 
466.27 

457.17 

548.86 

29,499. 
585.38 
585.38 
431.36 
466.27 

607.33 
414.42 

440.80 



{ContdmPagell) 











mmmmmi: 




(Cont'd from Page 20} 












Water Service 














Inspector 




415.37 


425.02 


434.66 


444.31 


466.27 


Water/Sewer 














Maint Craftsman 




426.83 


437.14 


447.46 


457.78 


475.63 


Water/Sewer 














Maint Man 




401.99 


410.52 


419.99 


432.92 


457.17 


Water System 














Junior Craftsman 




369.54 


377.31 


385.14 


392.93 


414.90 


Welder 




435.21 


445.54 


455.89 


466.20 


488.17 


Working Foreman/ 














Carpenter 




420.12 


444.18 


468.25 


492.32 


514.25 


Working Foreman, 














Gardener, Heavy 


MEO 


479.37 


487.39 


495.41 


503.43 


516.04 


Working foreman 














Gen Services 




420.12 


444.18 


468.25 


492.32 


514.25 


Working Foreman, 


Hwy 












Maint Craftsman 




491.19 


496.92 


502.66 


508.39 


514.25 


Working Foreman, 


Laborei 


428.93 


438.57 


441.14 


457.87 


479.83 


Working Foreman, 


Mason 


479.37 


487.39 


495.41 


503.43 


516.04 


Woridng Foreman, 














Motor Equipment 














Repairman 1 




25,633. 






26,397. 


27,537. 


Working Foreman, 














Motor Equipment 














Repainnan II 




27,091 


27,573. 


28,053. 


28,535. 


29,499. 


Woridng Foreman 














Hvy 














MEO Laborer 




491.19 


496.92 


502.66 


508.39 


514.25 


Woridng Foreman 














Special MEO 




479.37 


487.39 


495.41 


503.43 


516.04 


Woridng Foreman 














Tire Repaimian 




491.19 


496.92 


502.66 


508.39 


514.25 


Working Foreman, 














Tree Climber, Laborer 


491.19 


496.92 


502.66 


508.39 


514.25 


Working Foreman, 














Water Meter Repairman 


491.19 


500.36 


509.53 


518.70 


527.50 


Woridng Foreman, 


Water/ 












Sewer Maint 














Craftsman 




491.19 


500.36 


509.53 


518.70 


527.50 


Woridng Foreman 














Water/Sewer Maint 


Man 


491.19 


496.92 


502.66 


508.39 


514.25 


Woridng Foreman 














Welder 




27,091. 


27,573. 


28,053. 


28,535. 


29,499. 


Yardman 




491.19 


496.92 


502.66 


508.39 


514.25 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1,1993 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Cleri< Of Council 

Approved January 13,1993 

AT,., o A4. A • L ,, James A. Sheets, Mayor 

A True Copy, Attest: Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 
1/14/93 ' 



LEGAL NOTICE 

COIWIMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P3106E1 
Estate of ABRAHAM 
SOLOD AKA: ABRAHAM 
J. SOLOD late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that ARNOLD 
S. SOLOD of BOSTON in 
the County of SUFFOLK be 
appointed executor named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 
17,1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourth day of 
January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/14/93 



Thursday, January 14, 1993 Qulncy Sun Page 21 

Michael Marshall Joins 
roS South Shore Office 



CrTY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 354 

ORDERED: Dec. 21, 1992 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, 
that the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, are further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXX. Salaries. 
Section 151 . General Salary Classification and Wages: 

STRIKE OUT THE FOLLOWING: 

TITLE STEP1 STEP 2 STEPS 

Police Sergeant 36,689. 37,269. 37,912. 

Police Lieutenant 43,648. 45,128. 46,632. 

Police Captain 51,941. 54,605. 57,357. 

AND INSERT THE FOLLOWING: 

Effective 1/1/93: 

Police Sergeant 37,413. 38,042. 38,670. 

Police Lieutenant 46,017. 46,791. 47,565. 

Police Captain 56,602. 57,554. 58,504. 

Effective 1/1/94: 

Police Sergeant 38,161. 38,803. 39,443. 

Police Lieutenant 46,937. 47,727. 48,516. 

Police Captain 57,734. 58,705. 59,674. 

Effective 1/1/95: 

Police Sergeant 39,306. 39,967. 40,626. 

Police Lieutenant 48,345. 49,159. 49,971. 

Police Captain 59,466. 60,466. 61,464. 

Effective 6/30/95: 

Police Sergeant 39,699. 40,367. 41,032. 

Polkje Lieutenant 48,828. 49,651. 50,471. 

Police Captain 60,061. 61,071. 62,079. 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1 ,1 993 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk Of Council 

Approved January 13,1993 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 

A True Copy, Attest: Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 

1/14/93 



LEGAL NOTICE 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 343 

ORDERED: December 7, 1992 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the revised ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 976, 
as amended be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXX. Salaries. 
Section 1 51 . Or )l Salary Classification and Wages. 
STRIKE OUT Th^ rOLLOWING: 



TITLE STEP 1 

Pati-olman $24,322. 

AND INSERT THE FOLLOWING: 



TITLE 

Effective 1/1/93 
PATROL OFFICER 
Effective 1/1/94 
PATROL OFFICER 
Effective 1/1/95 
PATROL OFRCER 
Effective 6/30/95 
PATROL OFRCER 



STEP1 
$24,808. 
$25,304. 
$26,063. 



STEP 2 
$29,430. 

STEP 2 

$30,019. 

$30,619 

$31,538. 



STEP 3 
$30,823. 

STEP 3 

$31,439. 

$32,068. 

$33,030. 



$26,324. $31,853. $33,360. 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1 ,1 993 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk Of Council 

Approved January 13,1993 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 

A True Copy, Attest: Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 

1/14/93 




BUY U.S. 
SAVINGS BONDS 



Heart Attack. 

Fignt it with a 

MLMiKiria gift to 

the American 

Heart Association. 




THE AMERICAN HEART 

ASSOCIATION 
MEMORIAL PROGRAM. 


American Heart ^^ 
Association^^ 

Thn ipaca ptovidad at 1 puUc Mmca 





Michael J. Marshall of 
Quincy, a personal 
financial planner with IDS 
Financial Services Inc., 
recently opened an office 
at 25 Braintree Hill Office 
Park, Braintree. 

Marshall's practice 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 88P1289A1 
Notice of 
Fiduciary's Account 

To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
Mary Coffin late of Quincy 
in the County of Norfolk. 

Your are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass R. Civ. 
P. Rule 72 that the First 
and Final account(s) of 
Donald W. Hansen as 
temporary guardian- 
conservator- (the 
fiduciary) of the property 
of said Mary Coffin has- 
have been presented to 
said Court for allowance. 

If you desire to 
preserve your right to file 
an objection of said 
account(s), you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before the 
seventeenth day of 
February, 1993 the return 
day of this citation. You 
may upon written request 
by registered or certified 
mail to the fiduciary, or to 
the attorney for the 
fiduciary, obtain without 
cost a copy of said 
account(s). If you desire 
to object to any item of 
said account(s), you must, 
in addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, 
file within thirty days after 
said return day or within 
such other time as the 
Court upon motion may 
order a written statement 
of each such item together 
with the grounds for each 
objection thereto, a copy 
to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to 
Mass. R. Civ. P. Rule 5. 

WITNESS. Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of Said Court at 
Dedham this fourth day of 
January, 1993. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
1/14/93 



consists of working with 
clients to effectively 
analyze their financial 
needs and develop 
comprehensive financial 
plans. 

IDS offers a variety of 
financial planning services 
and products. These 
include personal financial 
planning, mutual funds, 
insurance and annuity 
products, investment 
certificates and brokerage 
services. IDS is an 
American Express 
Company. 

LEQAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P2966E1 

Estate of JAMES SMALL 

late of QUINCY in the 

County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that JAMES C. 
SMALL of SHELBURNE 
FALLS in the County of 
FRANKLIN be appointed 
executor named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 3, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-third 
day of December, one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/14/93 



IH^miiN FO» ilDS 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

1305 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY, MA 02169 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and 

delivering to the City of Quincy: 

QUINCY COLLEGE: 

BUILDING & HARDWARE SUPPLIES, JANUARY 27. 

1993, @ 10:00 A.M. 

QUINCY COLLEGE: 

REBID : MAILING SERVICES, JANUARY 27, 1993 @ 

10:30 A.M. 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the 

Purchasing Agent, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., 

Quincy, MA 02169. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date and 

any allowable discounts. 

Firm bki prices will be given first consideration and will be 

received at the office of tiie Purchasing Agent until the 

time and date stated above, at which time and date they 

will be publicly opened and read. 

Bids must be in a sealed envelope. The outside of the 

sealed envelope is to be clearly marked, 'BID 

ENCLOSED' with time/date of bid call. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bkJs or to accept 

any part of a bkJ or the one deemed l)est for thie City. 

James A. Sheets, MAYOR 
Robert F. Denvir Jr.. PURCHASING AGENT 



1/14/93 



Page 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 14, 1993 



:|:|;|X|«:g:>gi,i|||X:^^ 






COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P2965E1 

Estate of ELEANOR W. 

SMALL late of QUINCY in 

the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that JAMES C. 
SMALL of SHELBURNE 
FALLS in the County of 
FRANKLIN be appointed 
executor named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 3, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, wKhin thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-third 
day of December, one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/14/93 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P3118E1 
Estate of JAMES T. 
STARRS late of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that MARY E. 
STARRS of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executrix 
named in the will with out 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 17, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30 
days) after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourth day of 
January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/14/93 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P3097E1 
Estate of SHIRLEY M. 
LAING late of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved 
allowed and that ROBERT 
LAING of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executor named 
in the will with out surety 
on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 17, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30 
days) after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 1 6. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourth day of 
January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/14/93 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P3077E1 
Estate of ANTONETTA 
BUCCILLI AKA: 

ANTONETTA BUCILLI AND 
ANTOINETTA BUCCILLI 
late of QUINCY In the 
County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that AMELIA 
B. MARTELL, also known 
as EMELIA B. MARTELL of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 
17,1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourth day of 
January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/14/93 



Squirt House 



Pee Wee House 



All-Star, Marina Tie Burgin Holds Lead 



The Morrissey Qub was 
idle and holds a two-point 
lead in the Pee Wee 
House League. 

Second place All-Star 
Sports tied Marina Bay 
Taxi, 5-5, with Joe 
Vallatini scoring twice and 

COMMOfJWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P2322GM 

NOTICE OF 

GUARDIANSHIP OF 
MINOR 

To RICHARD WALSH of 
PARTS UNKNOWN and to 
all persons interested in 
the estates of RICHARD 
WAYNE WALSH of 
QUINCY in said County, 
minor. A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that SHIRLEY RILEY of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
Guardian of minor with 
custody without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
January 27, 1993. 

WITNESS, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this fifth day of 
October, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/14/93 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P3116E1 

Estate of AGNES M. 

CANNATA late of QUINCY 

in the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that ROBERT 
D. O'LEARY of MILTON in 
the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executor 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 17, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourth day of 
January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
1/14/93 



Kevin Cellucci, John 
Laukkanen and Gene 
Silverman once each for 
All-Star. Laukkanen and 
Silverman had two assists 
each and Vallatini one. 
Dan Stock had a hat trick 
and Jason Snaith and Tim 
Lewis a goal each for 
Marina Bay. Mark Glynn 
and John Masone bad two 
assists apiece and Steve 
Verlicco, Lewis and Stock 
one each. 

Keohane's edged 
Colonial Federal, 5-4, with 
Mike Fitzpatrick having 
two goals and Bobby Hall, 
Ron Gamel and Carlos 
Ashmanskas one each. 
Fitzpatrick, Brad 
Macauley, Glenn Chase, 
Hall and Steve McMahon 
had assists. Paul 
McCarthy, Billy Connolly, 
Mike Struzik and Chris 
Haidul scored for Colonial 
Federal and Connolly, Jon 
Haddad and Robbie 
Winter had assists. 

The standings: 

Morrissey Qub, 9-3-1; All- 
Star Sports, 7-3-3; Marina 
Bay Taxi, 5-7-1; 
Keohane's, 4-7-3; Colonial 
Federal, 3-8-2. 



Burgin Plainer holds a 
two-point lead over The 
Quincy Sun after tying 
Green Environmental, 5-5, 
in the Squirt House 
League. 

Sean Fennelly had two 
goals and Mike SulUvan, 
Steve Ford and Sean 
LeFebvre one apiece for 
Burgin. Mike Viles had 
two assists and Ford, Billy 
Griffin, Sullivan and 
Terrence Doherty one 
each. Matt Gibbons scored 
twice and Graham 
McShane, Mike Whalen 
and John Katsarikas once 
each for Green. Andrew 
Nestor had three assists 
and Tom Maloney, Sean 
Garvey and Didier Alther 
one each. 

The Quincy Sun topped 
Granite Auto Electric, 8-4, 
as Kevin Mason had a bat 
trick, Mike Carloni two 
goals and Scott Keefe, 
Martin McGrath and Joe 
Watson one each. Dave 
Noonan, McGrath, Ashley 
Rowerdink, Watson and 
John Grazioso had assists. 
Dan Kennedy bad two 
goals and Sbaun Cheney 
and Frank Curreri one 



each for Granite Auto and 
Ryan Doyle, Curreri, Nick 
Pizziferri and Paul Burke 
had assists. 

Doran & Horrigan 
outlasted Johnson Motor 
Parts, 10-8, with Mark 
Giese, Chad Fitzpatrick, 
Chris Lumaghini and 
Adam Smith having two 
goals apiece and Robbie 
Bell and Pat Kenney one 
each. Chris Cullen had 
three assists and Matt 
Kenney, Smith, Giese, 
Lumaghini, Fitzpatrick, 
Matt Minicucci and. Bell 
one each. Chris Carthas 
bad four goals and Brian 
Sylvester, Kevin Lynch, 
Steve King and Mike 
Sullivan one each for 
Johnson. Paul Markarian 
had three assists, Paul 
Zenga and John Bertucci 
two apiece and Lynch and 
Mark Doyle one each. 

The standings: Burgin 
Plainer, 7-2-2; Quincy 
Sun, 7-4-0; Doran & 
Horrigan, 6-4-1; Johnson 
Motor Parts, 5-5-1; Green 
Environmental, 3-6-2; 
Granite Auto Electric, 1-8- 
2. 



Squirt Bs Win Pair 



Quincy's Squirt B 
hockey team, sponsored by 
Continental Cablevision, 
continued its winning ways 
with a 3-1 victory over 
Parkway following a 5-0 
win over Franklin. 
Matt Gibbons, Paul 

■;':■:■;■!•!-■■•' ?^W^ WPS^n^mF: ': '^Hjwv'* ■■xN^ w!^ ■:■!-!■:■;■: 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE COURT 

AND FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P3088E1 
Estate of VICTORIA 
KILEY late of Quincy In 
the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that JAMES 
MERZI of EASTON in the 
County of BRISTOL be 
appointed executor named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 17, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourth day of 
January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
1/14/93 



Burke and Mike Sullivan 
had the goals against 
Paikway and Didier Alther 
bad two assists and Matt 
O'Connell and John 
Sullivan one each. 

The defense, anchored 
by Ryan Krueger, 



mf^mfmmmf* 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P3001A1 
Estate of AMELIA 
ABDALLAH late of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that GEORGE F. 
ABDALLAH of QUINCY in 
the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed administrator 
of said estate without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
February 3, 1 993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-third 
day of December, in the 
year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/14/93 



frustrated several attempts 
by Parkway to narrow 
Quincy's lead, including a 
6 to 3 power play. John 
Katsarikas and Kiva Tupe 
played outstanding 
defense. 

Quincy's earlier win 
over Franklin moves it to 
the final round of 
playdowns for entry to the 
state championships in the 
spring. 

Dr. Chrzan 
Meeting 

Speaker 

Dr. James S. Chrzan of 
Quincy recently spoke at a 
regional meeting of 
endocrinologists, vascular 
surgeons and podiatrists in 
New Orleans, La. 

His talk was entitled, 
"Biomechanical 
Implications of Peripheral 
Neuropathies in Diabetes." 

Dr. Chrzan is a clinical 
instructor in surgery at 
Harvard Medical School 
and is on staff at 
Deaconess Hospital and 
the Joslin Diabetes Center. 



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Thursday, January 14, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 23 




i,eQAtlNK>TICeS 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COUFIT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P3040GI 
NOTICE OF 
GUARDIANSHIP of 

PHYSICALLY 
INCAPACITATED 
To ISABELLA M. 
JOHNSTON of QUINCY in 
said County and all 
persons interested in the 
estate of ISABELLA M. 
JOHNSTON and to the 
Massachusetts 
Department of Mental 
Health, a petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that ROBERT L. 
JOHNSTON of QUINCY in 
the county of NORFOLK 
be appointed guardian of 
physically incapacitated 
with surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
February 17, 1993. 

WITNESS, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this twenty-third 
day of December, in the 
year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
1/14/93 



EVERYBODY'S MARKErPUCE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE COURT 

AND FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P3089E1 
Estate of NORMA M. 
HAGER late of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that ARTHUR 
A. HAGER, Jr., of QUINCY 
in the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executor 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 17, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourth day of 
January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
1/14/93 



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LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMBJT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 87P1926E1 
Notice of 
Fiduciary's Account 

To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
Madeline M. Cohen late of 
Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 72 that the First 
and Final account(s) of 
The Rrst National Bank of 
Boston and Abraham 
Cohen as executors (the 
fiduciary) of said estate 
has-have been presented 
to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to 
preserve your right to file 
an objection of said 
account(s), you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before the 
seventeenth day of 
February, 1993 the return 
day of this citation. You 
may upon written request 
by registered or certified 
mail to the fiduciary, or to 
the attorney for the 
fiduciary, obtain without 
cost a copy of said 
account(s). If you desire 
to object to any item of 
said account(s), you must, 
in addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, 
file within thirty days after 
said return day or within 
such other time as the 
Court upon motion may 
order a written statement 
of each such item together 
with the grounds for each 
objection thereto, a copy 
to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to 
Mass. R. Civ. P. Rule 5. 

WITNESS, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of Said Court at 
Dedham this sixth day of 
January, 1993. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/14/93 



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I 

I INDEX 

I 

I 

I 



D Services 

D For Sale 

a Autos 

a Boato 

D For Rent 

a Wanted 

O Help Wanted 

O Pets, Livestock 

D Lost and Found 

D Reai Estate For Sale 

a Real Estate Wanted 

O IMiscellaneous 

a Work Wanted 

O Antiques 

D Coins A Stamps 

a Rest Homes 

D Instruction 

O Day Care 

a Personal 

a Electrical A Appliances 



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D $5.00foronelneertlon,upto20 words, 10«fore«*addltlonalword. 
D $4.eoperlnaertionupto20wordafor3-7inaertlon$oftheaamead. 

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D Enclosed is $ 

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Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 14, 1993 

First Time Homebuyer 
Workshops Begin Jan. 19 



A series of First Time 
Homebuyer's Workshops 
will be held Tuesday, Jan. 
19 and 26, and Feb. 2 and 
9, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at 
Quincy City Hall, second 



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Men thru Wad, Frt & Sat until 6 pm 
Tlwr*. until Spin. 



floor conference room. 

The series is sponsored 
by the Quincy Community 
Action Programs, an 
MHFA approved 

counselling agency. 

Attendance at all four 
workshops is mandatory to 
qualify for low interest 
MHFA mortgage 

packages. 

The agenda will be 
comprehensive and 
individualized. Advance 
registration is required. 
Fee is $40 and covers the 
cost of the text and 
materials. 

For information and 
registration forms call 
Kaye Wagner, Housing 
Specialist at Quincy 
Community Action 
Programs, Inc., 1509 
Hancock St., Quincy, 
02169,479-8181. 

Jon Simons 
Lung Hero 

Jon Simons of the South 
Shore YMCA in Quincy 
has been selected as a 
"Local Hero" by the 
Norfolk County-Newton 
Lung Association. 

For the past three years 
Simons has worked with 
the Lung Association to 
provide physical 



Humane Societies Seek 
Donations For Homeless Cats 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

Even someone covered 
with fur shouldn't have to 
live on the streets. 

Five local humane 
societies are seeking 
donations to help control 
Quincy 's rapidly growing 
population of homeless 
cats. 

The organizations 
united in the effort are 
CEASE (Citizens to End 
Animal Suffering and 
Exploitation) in 

Somerville, All Paws 
Rescue in Hingham, 
Quincy Animal League, 
South Shore Humane 
Society in Quincy, and 
Animal Umbrella in East 
Arlingtoa 

CEASE Assistant 
Director Debra Dennis said 
the number of Quincy 
homeless cats runs at least 
into the hundreds. 

"Most people probably 
aren't aware of it, because 
cats are nocturnal animals 
and come out at night," 
said Dennis. "But it's 
definitely a growing 
problem." 

All Paws spokesperson 
Donna Howard, who works 
in Quincy, said she 



conditioning programs for estimates the number to 

reach into the thousands. 



children, ages eight to 13, 
who suffer from asthma. 
The programs help 
children manage their 
disease. 



"It's an extremely 
serious problem that we 
need to solve," said 
Howard. "If we're not part 



of the solution, we're part 
of the problem." 

City officials and 
animal rights activists met 
Jan 5 at City Hall to 
discuss the matter, but 
Dennis said the city was 
unable to offer any 
financial assistance. 

"The city doesn't have 
the money to support a 
program like this," said 
Dennis. "That's why we 
have to reach out to the 
community." 

Asked why residents 
should donate their hard- 
earned money to a fund for 
homeless cats, the two 
women offered several 
reasons. 

"It's mainly a humane 
issue," said Dennis. 
"These animals are 
suffering in the wintertime 
because they're not getting 
the food and care that they 
need. 

"Most cats give birth to 
up to three litters a year, 
and less than half of these 
kittens make it past three 
weeks old. Many of them 
die from upper respiratory 
problems they develop in 
the winter cold." 

Dennis added that the 
spread of rabies is also a 
constant threat. 

"Rabies should 
definitely be a concern," 
she said. "Cats can 
sometimes get them 



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(rabies) from fighting with 
skunks and raccoons, 
which are also nocturnal 
animals." 

Both Dennis and 
Howard, however, stressed 
that there is no need for a 
rabies panic in the Quincy 
area, noting that most of 
the cats they have helped 
receive veterinary care are 
relatively healthy. 

Howard said homeless 
cats also face the threat of 
being threatened or abused 
by children and other 
residents, which could end 
up being more of a 
problem for the people 
than the animals. 

"A person who harms 
an animal— any animal- 
could face up to five years 
in state prison or a fine of 
up to $1,000, according to 
Massachusetts law," said 
Howard. 

Howard said the cats 
can also be a financial 
burden on residents who 
attempt to show 
compassion. 

"I know of people who 
are spending money from 
their Social Security 
checks to buy cat food to 
feed these cats," she said. 

Howard added that 
overpopulation is a prime 
concern, noting that if 
homes could be fouhd for 
the cats, the number of 
litters could be 
dramatically decreased. 

Dennis said the five 
humane societies have 
been trapping the animals 



in cages and taking them 
directly to local 
veterinarians. The majority 
are then taken to a cat 
shelter on the same 
property as Kresshingham 
Kennels in Hingham. 
Those few that are very 
unhealthy, Dennis said, 
are "humanely 

euthanized." 

"It's much more 
humane for them to die 
like that then to die out in 
the streets, which is a 
long, painful death," shp 
said. 

Howard said money 
from donations would be 
used to purchase 
additional cages for 
trapping the animals, as 
well as food, kitty litter, 
blankets, veterinary bills, 
and other expenses. The 
five organizations 
eventually want to start an 
Adopt-A-Kitten program, 
she added. 

Donations should be 
made payable to Debra 
Dennis, 11 Egypt Ave., 
Scituate, MA 02066 (a 
P.O. box will be 
established at a later 
date). Those making 
donations are asked to 
write "Quincy Homeless 
Cats" on their checks and 
envelopes. 

Volunteers are also 
needed. For more 
information on the 
homeless cats problem, 
call Dennis at the CEASE 
office at 628-9030. 



Quincy IRS Office Hours 



Gerald R. Esposito, 
Boston IRS District 
Director announces the 
Quincy office, 1458 
Hancock St., will be open 
from 8:30 a.m. to noon and 
from 1 to 4:30 p.m. 
Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday. 

The office will 
distribute forms, answer 
quick questions and assist 
the taxpayers with federal 
tax inquiries. 



If walk-in hours are 
inconvenient, call the toll- 
free telephone site for 
assistance. 

The toll-free numbers 
are: 

1-800-829-1040, Tax 
Information (Refund Info) 
and 1-800-829-FORM 
Forms/Publications. 

Massachusetts 
taxpayers have until April 
15 to file their income tax 
returns. 



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VOL. 25 No. 18 



Thursday, January 21, 1993 




For Outstanding Community Service 

Stephen Cantelli Sun 
Citizen Of The Year' 



Stephen Cantelli, an 
innovative fifth grade 
teacher at the Lincoln 
Hancock School who 
believes in community 
education— outside as 
well as inside the 
classroom— is The Quincy 
Sun's 1992 "Citizen of 
the Year." 

Cantelli, 42, a teacher 
for 21 years in the 
Quincy School System, 
was selected for the 
honor from among 28 
nominees submitted by 
Quincy Sun readers. 

A nine -member panel 
of judges made the final 
selection from the 28 
nominees. 

Established in 1985, 
the award honors an 
individual for outstanding 
community service or 
recognizes a special 
achievement annually. 

Cantelli was 

nominated by his wife, 
Julie, but she didn't tell 
him she was doing it 

"I was surprised," he 
said, when inf(mned that 
he had been selected to 
receive the award. "I 
didn't know I had been 
nominated. I'm thrilled 
at having been selected." 

Sun Publisher Henry 
Bosworth congratulated 
Cantelli on his selection 
and the other 27 
nominees. 

"To be nominated is 
an honor in itself," he 
said. "The nominations 
come from those in the 
community who 

recognize and appreciate 
the work and efforts of 
dedicated people. But 
there can only be one 
recipient." 

Cantelli is the eighth 
annual winner. Past 
recipients were: 

•Anthony Siciliano, 
deputy director of Quincy 
Emergency Management 
(fonnerly Civil Defense). 




STEPHEN CANTELLI, a fifth grade teacher at the 
Lincoln Hancock Community School, is The Quincy 
Sun's 1992 'Citizen of the Year." 

children, James, 11; 



•Ruth Wainwright, 
long-time community 
volunteer. 

•Richard Koch Sr., 
leader in community and 
charitable causes who 
was honored 

posthumously. 

•Martin Finnegan, 
coordinator of Project 
Impact, a Quincy schools 
program that helps 
youngsters to deal with 
substance abuse. 

•Qara Yeomans, long- 
time environmentalist. 

•Gerald Gherardi, 
active in many charities 
and service 

organizations. 

•Frank Kearns, 
community activist and 
advocate for the city's 
elderly, homeless, needy 
and poor. 

Cantelli and his wife 
Uve at 65 West St., West 
Quincy, with their three 



Katharine, 10, and 
Andrew, 8. The oldest 
two children have ben in 
their father's social 
studies class. 

Cantelli has been an 
elementary school 
teacher all of his 22 
years in the Quincy 
public school system— the 
last 10 at the Lincoln 
Hancock Community 
School. He started his 
career at the former 
Pollard School where he 
taught 10 years. He also 
taught a year at the 
Parker School. 

"I strongly believe in 
community education," 
Cantelli says. 

He practices what he 
preaches by bringing 
members of the 
community into bis 
classroom to share their 

Confd on Page 5 




Sheets Seeks Sewer 

Water Rate Relief 

On Capitol Hill 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

While attending the U.S. Conference of Mayors in Washington D.C., earlier 
this week. Mayor James Sheets met with key congressional leaders to outline a 
plan which the mayor believes will help reduce escalating water and sewer bills. 



With a new presidential drain project and 

administration taking downsizing the 

office. Sheets said there is pelletization process at the 

a "window of opportunity" Fore River plant to sludge 

to secure federal aid for cakes only. Now, the 

the $7 billion Boston "cakes" are converted into 

Harbor cleanup project, pellets. 

Without relief, the mayor Sheets said MWRA 

said rates could increase Director Doug MacDonald 



21 percent this fiscal year 
and 31 percent next fiscal 
year. 

"We can't allow that to 
happen," the mayor said in 
a telephone interview 
Tuesday. Without rate 
relief, a sewer bill for an 
average family of four 
could skyrocket to $2000 
by die end of the decade. 

The Sheets plan or 
strategy, showcased by the 
mayor to some 
Massachusetts 
congressmen on Capital 
Hill, includes three 
components. 

llie first prong calls for 
reducing the cost and 
magnitude of the multi- 
billion dollar cleanup by 
shrinking the size of the 
secondary treatment 
program, lessening the 
MWRA's sewer and storm 



is "committed" to scaling 
back portions of the 
cleanup project. The 
mayor said a reduction 
effort could save as much 
as $1 billion. 

The Sheets strategy 
also calls for "substantial" 
federal government 
funding and additional 
state funding, perhaps 
through bonding. 

In the short term, the 
mayor said he wants the 
federal government to kick 
in $100 to $200 million in 
a direct appropriation to 
the cleanup project to help 
stem the tide of rising 
rates. 

"We need some bridge 
money to flatten out rates. 
My goal is to see the rates 
flatten this year. I want 
them to level off 

"Right now, the 



momentum is up. We 
have to stop that." 

On Monday, the mayor 
pitched his plan to two top 
MWRA officials. On 
Tuesday, he met with 
Congressmen Gerry 
Studds, Joseph Moakley 
and Edward Markey. He 
planned to meet with Sen. 
Ted Kennedy and 
Congressmen Barney 
Frank and Joseph Kennedy 
Thursday. 

All of the congressmen 
represent cities and towns 
in the MWRA district. 

To implement cleanup 
reform and lower water 
and sewer rates. Sheets 
said it will take a well- 
coordinated regional effort 
involving officials 
throughout the MWRA 
district. 

"The City of Quincy 
can't do it, the Town of 
Braintree can't do it, the 
Town of Weymouth can't 
do it. To get relief, we 
have to go to the federal 
and state governments. 

"What I'm Uying to do 
is get a commitment to 

(Cont'd on Page J 8) 



City Hopes To Keep 
Pneumatic Scale 



ENJOYING SOME RECREATION with his fifth grade students is teacher Stephen 
CantelU, The Quhicy Sun's 1992 "Citizen of the Year." 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 






By STEVE KAVANAGH 

City officials are 
keeping their fingers 
crossed that the Pneumatic 
Scale Corp. will remain in 
Quincy. 

Stop & Shop and 
Pneumatic Scale 

announced Jan. 8 that Stop 
& Shop will buy the 
Pneumatic Scale property 
on Newport Ave. and bmld 
a "Super Stop & Shop" 
there. 

Last week, Shaw's 
Supermarkets atmounced it 
has agreed to buy 7 1/2 
acres of property from 
Boston Gear. Shaw's wants 
to build a 48,000 sq. ft. 
supermarket at the site 
with an additional 27,000 
sq. ft. of retail space. 

The property is located 
in the Norfolk Downs 
section of North Quincy at 
Hayward and Hancock 
St.'s. The new store would 
employ 250 people said a 
Shaw's spokesman. 

The sale of the Boston 
Gear property to Shaw's 
blocks Pneumatic Scale 
from moving there. The 
manufacturer of bottling 



and packing equipment 
employs 335 people and is 
one of the city's largest 
taxpayers. 

A spokesman for 
Pneumatic Scale, James 
Lawson, said last week 
that the company will look 
to relocate in Quincy fu^t. 

Pneumatic Scale's 
current multi-story property 
includes 300,000 sq. ft. 
Lawson said a new site 
would not need that much 
space. 

Lawson said his 
company will begin 
looking for a new home in 
the coming weeks. 

"We intend to start that 
process soon," Lawson 
said. "We will set up a 
meeting with the city 
plaiming board in the next 
few weeks." 

Lawson also said he has 
spoken to City Councillors 
Lany Chretien and Bruce 
Ayers. 

"The city has 
mentioned a couple of 
sights which may be 
available," Lawson said. 
However, he would not 



reveal the sights. "That 
would be premature for me 
to say." 

A possible home for 
Pneumatic Scale may be 
the former site of the 
Duane Construction Co. on 
Southern Artery. The 
property is owned by Twiss 
Development and Stop & 
Shop has the controlling 
interest. 

The site is zoned as 
Planned Unit Development 
and the City Council 
would be the special 
permit granting authority 
for any proposal there. 

"They would need a 
favorable recommendation 
from the Planning Board 
and a two- thirds vote of 
the City Council," said 
Quincy Planning Director 
Rich Meade. 

Ward 1 City Councillor 
Peter Kolson said if such a 
proposal is made he would 
probably favor it. 

"I would like to see a 
plan... if it's a one-story 
operation I wouldn't have 
any objection to it," 

(ContdonPage 18) 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 21, 1993 



Shooters Club Cafe 
Expansion Approved 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

The Quincy License 
Board Tuesday granted a 
request from Shooters Club 
Cafe, 1585 Hancock St., to 
expand its premises from 
1,248 to 2,557 square feet. 

The matter had been 
continued for one week in 
accordance with the 
board's new rule that all 
hearings having to do with 
AIl-Alcobolic and/or 
Common Victualer 
Licenses be reviewed 
twice. 

The expansion, which 



has the support of Ward 3 
Councillor Lawrence 
Chretien and the Quincy 
Center Business and 
Professional Association, 
received no opposition 
Tuesday or at the board's 
previous meeting. 

The board did receive a 
letter in opposition, 
however, from Dr. and Mrs. 
Carl Goodman of 31 A 
Revere Rd. The letter 
stated that there are 
several liquor 

establishments in that one 
block and that expanding 



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one of them is not 
necessary. 

"The plans for 
developing the Hancock 
Parking lot with stores like 
Toys 'R' Us and a nice 
shopping area will not mix 
well" with the liquor 
establishments in the area, 
the letter stated. 

Police Chief Francis 
Mullen said be did not feel 
the expansion would cause 
any problems in the area. 

The cafe's existing 
premises consists of four 
billiard tables, a service 
bar seating 12 and four 
tables seating 16. The 
expanded cafe will add 
three billiard tables and 
replace the existing tables 
with seven booths seating 
28, as well as six 
additional seats. Men's 
and women's restrooms 
will also be added, 
according to Atty. Dennis 

(Cota'donPagtlS) 



Toland 'Likely' To Resign 
From Council Next Week 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

City Councillor-at- 
Large Patricia Toland will 
probably resign next week. 
When asked Tuesday, 
Toland said it is "likely" 
she will announce her 
resignation sometime 
during the flnal week of 
January. 

Toland's resignation 
from the Council is 
necessary before the 
Council approves her 
expected nomination as 
assistant city clerk. She 
must resign 30 days prior 
to beginning as assistant 
city clerk. 

Toland said if all goes 
well she hopes to begin as 
assistant clerk March 1. 

City Clerk Joseph 
Shea's office has operated 
without an assistant since 
October when former 
assistant clerk Shea 
replaced John Gillis who 



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retired after 33 years of 
service. 

She is one of just three 
women, along with Edna 
Austin and Joanne 
Condon, to serve as a City 
Councillor. Toland said it 
is "a disgrace" that more 
women have not been 
elected to the Council. 

Toland said the main 
thing that attracted her to 
the assistant clerk's job is 
her love of the political 
process. 

"I feel it's an exciting 
job. I love elections and 
politics," Toland said. "I 
get excited during 
elections and this is the 
office that makes them 
work." 

Toland said she is 
qualified because of her 
political career and her 
experience as chairman of 
the League of Women 
Voters' voter service 
committee. In the late 
1960s and early 70s 
Toland chaired that 
committee which helped 
stage candidate's nights. 

"I think you need 
someone who is familiar 
with the whole process of 
running for office," she 
said. "I know I have an 
aptitude for this (asst. 
clerk).... I've been in nine 
elections." 

Toland was elected to 
the School Committee in 
1975 and won re-election 
in 1979. She stepped down 
in 1981 after winning a 



City Council at-large seat. 
Since then she has been 
re-elected five times. 

The only bump in the 
road of her successful 
political career came in 
1988 when she lost a 
primary race for State 
Representative to Steve 
Tobin. 

During her tenure on the 
School Committee she 
served as Vice Chairman. 
As a City Councillor, 
Toland has been Council 
President and chairman of 
a number of committees 
including the important 
finance, ordinance and 
downtown development 
committees. 

Over the years she has 
served as president of the 
Massachusetts Municipal 
Counselors Association 
and is currently Quincy's 
representative on that 
board. She also served as 
chairman of the Women's 
Elected Officials 
Association. 

Toland was a school 
teacher in Randolph from 
1953 until 1964. She left 
teaching to begin her 
family. She became a 
member of the LWV 
which increased her 
interest in politics. 

It won't take long for 
Toland to get her feet wet 
as assistant clerk. A 
municipal election is 
scheduled for this fall. 



Atty. Morgan Gray Appointed 
To Mass. Bar Association Section 



Atty. Morgan Gray of 
Quincy has been appointed 
to the Massachusetts Bar 
Association young lawyer's 
division by MBA president 
Elaine Epstein. 

The Massachusetts Bar 
Association sections 
provide lawyers with up to 
date information on 
specific areas of law, 
monitor law-related 
legislation, sponsor 



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Thursdaj, Janiury 21, 1993 Quincj Sun Page 3 



8 Charged In WoUaston 

Credit Union Loan Fraud 

To Be Arraigned Today 



Remembering MLK On His Birthday 



The eight men indicted 
Friday for defrauding the 
WoUaston Credit Union in 
a $5 million loan scam 
will be arraigned today 
(Thursday) in Suffolk 
County Superior Court, 
Boston. 

The former president of 
the credit union, a former 
vice president, and a 
Quincy attorney were 
among the men charged in 
the case. 

Robert Dunphy of 
Hingham, president of 
WoUaston Credit Union 
from 1979 to 1989, is 
accused of using proceeds 
from fraudulent loans to 
fiind his own real estate 
projects on Cape Cod. 

John Bradley of 



Braintree, a former vice 
president for real estate 
lending at WoUaston 
Credit Union, is accused 
of approving the fraudulent 
loans. 

Quincy attorney Louis 
Bertucci, whose office at 5 
Beale St. is nearby the 
credit union, is accused of 
misusing loan proceeds to 
fund personal real estate 
ventures and of notarizing 
false statements for 
Dutq>by. 

Lawyers for Bradley 
and Bertucci said their 
clients deny the charges. 

Others indicted in the 
case include Dunphy's 
brother, George of 
Abington; John Garvey of 
Braintree; Thomas Garvey 



of West Bridgewater; 
Arnold Friedman of 
Weston; and Robert 
Galardi of Swampscott. 

The indictments charge 
that Dunphy and other 
defendants obtained loans 
for phony borrowers and 
used the money for 
themselves. 

Assistant Attorney 
General Mark Smith 
declined to comment on 
why the case is being tried 
in Suffolk County. 

WoUaston Credit Union 
has been supervised by 
regulators since Dunphy 
and the institution's board 
of directors were dismissed 
in November 1989. 
Regulators say that the 
credit union is now stable. 




REV. ADOLF WISMAR, left, pastor of WoUaston Lutheran Church, is presented the 
first Martin Luther King Jr. Award and a certificate of recognition by John Chen on 
behalf of the City of Quincy for his work and dedication to the needs of the city's Asian 
community during a Martin Luther King Jr. birthday celebration held at United First 
Parish Church. The celebration was sponsored by the City of Quincy, Quincy Fair 
Housing Committee, South Shore Coalition for Human Rights, Quincy Community 
Action Programs and United First Parish. 



License Board Briefs 



The Quincy License 
Board took the foUowing 
action at its meeting 
Tuesday: 

•Postponed for one 
week a request from Pizza 
Hut, 627 Washington St., 
for a change of manager 
from Lori Moore to Wayne 
A. Silva. 

•Granted a request from 
Quincy Youth Hockey, 
Junior Bruins Team for a 
permit to conduct a 
Canning Drive Friday and 
Saturday, Feb. 5-6. 

•Granted a request from 
the Disabled American 
Veterans, Quincy 
Cavanaugh Chapter 
(Robert LaFleur) for a 
permit to conduct a 
Canning Drive for their 
annual Forget Me Not 
Drive Thursday through 
Saturday, May 6-8, with 
rain dates of May 13-15. 

•Granted a request from 
Quincy Veterans Council 
(Robert LaFleur) that the 
month of May 1993 be set 
aside for the veterans and 



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veterans auxiliaries of 
Quincy for any Can 
Drives, Poppy Drives or 
Forget Me Not Drives. 

•Granted a request from 
North Quincy High School 
Track Boosters (Geoffrey 
Hennessy) for a permit to 
conduct a Canning Drive 
Friday through Sunday, 
Jan. 29-31. 

•Granted a request from 
New England Nonsense, 
103 Franklin St.(Andrew 
Ruggiano) for a permit to 



hold an auction at the 
Morrissette Post, Miller 
St., Wednesday, Feb. 3 
and Thursday, Feb. 18 
from 6:30 to 11 p.m. 

•Granted a request from 
WoUaston Chapter, Order 
of the Eastern Star (Elaine 
Caliri) for a permit to hold 
their annual Antique Show 
& Sale Saturday through 
Monday, Feb. 13-15, at the 
Quincy Masonic Temple, 
1170 Hancock St. 




Morrissey To Address Democrats 



Senator Michael 
Morrissey will speak to 
Ward 4 Democrats 
Thursday, Jan. 28 at 7 p.m. 
in the meeting room of the 
Drohan Apartments, 178 
Copeland St. 

Morrissey will be guest 
speaker at a meeting of 



the Ward 4 Democratic 
Committee. Ward 
Chairwoman Bernice 
Mader invites and 
encourages all residents to 
attend. 

Dessert and coffee will 
be served. 



'WE SHALL OVERCOME', the theme song of the Civil Ri^ts movement of the 1960s, 
is sung by audience during a birthday celebration for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at 
United First Parish Church. Holding hands, which signifies Dr. King's dream of racial 
unity, are, from left, Charlotte Roberts, Akpanoluo Etteh and Mark Leighton. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 



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Page 4 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 21, 1993 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co . Inc 

1372 Hancock St , Quincy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworth Jr Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth Editor 



30< p«r copy. $12.00 par year by mail in Quincy 
$14.00 p«r yMr by mall outaid* Quincy. $17 00 out of atate 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 «71-3l02 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun. 1372 Hanfcock St , Quincy, Mass 02169 



The Ouinoy Sun usumas no financial responsibility lor 
lypographica errors m idverlijements txjl will repnni thai 
part o( an advert ^seirent in which the typographical error 
occurs 



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Red Cross 
Blood Drives 



The South Area Office 
of the American Red Cross 
will conduct blood drives 
in Quincy on the following 
dates and locations: 

Monday, Feb. 8: 
Quincy Point Cong- 
regational Church, 444 
Washington St., 1 to 7 p.m. 

Monday, Feb. 22: 
Quincy Point Cong- 
regational Church, 444 
Washington St., 1 to 7 p.m. 



Wednesday, Feb. 24: 

Patriot Ledger, 400 Crown 
Colony, 1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

In addition. The 
American Red Cross 
Blood Services, 150 
Rustcraft Road, Dedham, 
is open for donations each 
week, Tuesday, Wed- 
nesday and Thursday from 
1 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays 
from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. 



Transitional Housing 

For Families In 
Shelters Topic Jan. 26 



A meeting to discuss 
transitional housing 
services for families in 
homeless shelters and 
families in need will be 
held Tuesday, Jan. 26 from 
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at East 
Milton Congregational 
Church, 610 Adams St., 
East Milton. 

Joanne Nawn, Director 
of Support Services for the 
Quincy Housing Authority, 
will be the featured 



speaker at the meeting of 
the South Shore and 
Coastline Councils for 
Children. 

The meeting is free and 
the pubUc is welcome. For 
information call Karen 
lacobucci, 773-1994. 

The Councils are 
volunteer groups of Quincy 
and South Shore residents 
interested in improving 
services for children and 
adolescents. 




The U.S. is the country with the greatest gold reserve. 



Medically 
Speaking 



by Michael M. Bakerman, M.D., FA.C.C. 




GET MOVING! 



Lack of exercise has 
joined the ranks of 
smoking, high blood 
pressure and high 
cholesterol as a top risk 
factor for developing heart 
disease. The American 
Heart Association used to 
list inactivity as one of the 
"other contributing factors" 
to the disease, along with 
obesity, diabetes and 
stress. After reviewing 
years of scientific 
research, the AHA deckJed 
to switch lack of exercise 
to top-priority status. In 
addition, the association 
noted that inactivity is 
probably also a major 
factor in devetoping adult- 
onset diabetes, osteo- 
porosis, and several types 
of cancer. The AHA now 
recommends that adults 
exercise 30 minutes to an 
hour at least three days a 
week, whether by jogging, 



walking or even gardening. 

P.S. Heart disease is 
the number one killer in the 
United States, claiming 
500,000 lives annually. 

Besides helping to 
prevent many serious 
forms of illness, including 
heart disease, regular 
exercise can relieve 
stress, speed up your 
metabolism, and help you 
sleep better. If you would 
like to learn what you can 
do to stay healthy and 
ward off the dangers of 
heart attacks, feel free to 
call COMPREHENSIVE 
CARDIAC CARE at 472- 
2550. If necessary, we will 
refer you to another 
medical professional. 
Office hours are by 
appointment at 101 Adams 
St., Suite 24 in Quincy. I 
am affiliated with Quincy 
Hospital and South Shore 
Hospitals. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



A Molehill Mountain 




The flap over selection of a new assistant city 
clerk soimds like it belongs in the "Mountain- 
out-of-a-molehill" department. 
It has been editorially proclaimed elsewhere that the 
competition for the job be "open" to 
make sure that the front-nmning can- 
didate — Coimcillor Patricia Toland 
— is the right choice. 

Selecting the assistant clerk in the 
manner it has been done through the 
years — and in keeping with the city TOLAND 
charter — now "smacks" of "cronyism" and "back 
room politics" it is editorially asserted. 

At qtiick glance that soimds like a pretty lofty stand. 
And, besides, politicians are always fair game to kick 
aroimd. 

But, aren't a few little things being overlooked? 

As city clerk, Joseph Shea has the 
right — and authority — imder the 
city's Plan A charter to recommend 
who he would like to have as his 
assistant subject to confumation by 
the City Coimcil. 

Both the city clerk and assistant 
SHEA city clerk posts come imder the juris- 
diction of the City Coimcil as does the city auditor. 

The city council makes die final decision via con- 
Hrmation. 

In 1957, for example. City Qerk Al lan Cole nomi- 
nated John Gillis as his assistant after 
succeeding Donald Crane as cl^rk. 
The council confirmed Gillis' ap- 
pointment. 

Two years later when Cole died, 
Gillis was promoted to city clerk by 
the City Council. Gillis in turn nomi- gbllis 
nated Thomas Burke to be his assistant and Burke was 
confirmed by the Council. 

Gillis, incidentally went on to serve 33 years asclerk 
and did a pretty good job to say the least. The process 
worked then. 

And it worked again in 1991 when Burke retired as 
assistant and Gillis nominated Shea to succeed him 
widi confirmation by the Council. Shea did a good job 
as assistant clerk and now as clerk. Shea is nominating 





Toland to be his assistant. Several other people asked 
to be considered and were. Shea selected Toland. 

Shouldn' t the city clerk be entitled to pick the person 
he wants as his assistant? A person who is compatible 
and one who will be his right arm in an important office 
that conducts the city elections, deals daily with the 
public and keeps the city's vital statistics? 

And shouldn't the City Council have its say in who 
gets the job, seeing that it comes imder the council's 
jurisdiction and directly affects the council? 

Who other than the city clerk and the City Council 
are better qualified to decide who should be the assis- 
tant clerk? 

Toland has been on the city council for 1 years and 
before that was a member of the School Committee. 
With her experience in the coimcil and her overall 
knowledge of the city, she should have no problem 
carrying out the duties of assistant city clerk. 

The assistant clerk - like the city clerk — should be 
someone familiar with Quincy. 

Opening the competition up sounds good and in 
these sad economic times, it no doubt would bring an 
avalanche of applications from job hunters everywhere. 
You might get a few who look like world-beaters on 
paper, at least. Ask them to come to City Hall for an 
interview and you might get: "Could you tell me how 
to get there?" 

Maybe that's stretching the point and argument for 
a local person. But someone with long-time knpwledge 
of the city and the people living here would seem to be 
a more valuable assistant clerk than just someone job- 
hunting. 

The city clerk and the City Council have the right to 
make the choice and shouldn't be accused of back 
room politics or cronyism. 

Just as a mayor has the right to pick his executive and 
personal secretaries.and other key officestaff members. 
What if he had to "open" those jobs up to everyone 
in the world? 

Mayor James Sheets, now midway through his 
second term, might still be pouring over applications 
and resumes. 

He picks who he wants. The city clerk and City 
Council have the right to pick who they want. 
Let's get on with it. 



Reader's Forum 



Solid Waste Problems 
Remain Unchanged 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

We write today to urge 
all Massachusetts 
residents to remember 
some simple facts about 
Question 3 from last fall's 
ballot. 

Our statewide grassroots 
"person-to-person" 
campaign faced $6 million 
worth of negative and 
misleading advertisements 
financed primarily by 
Exxon, Dow Chemical, 
Union Carbide, and other 
known polluters. 
Unfortunately, the truth 
about Question 3's 
environmental standards 
for packaging, and its list 
of thousands of endorsing 
organizations, often got 
pushed aside. 

The defeat of Question 
3 leaves our solid waste 
problems unchanged. 
Massachusetts still bums 
and buries two billion 
pounds of packaging trash 



A Thank You From 
The American Red Cross 



every year, wasting money 
and natural resources. One 
of our top environmental 
and economic priorities 
must be to reduce 
environmentally unsound 
packaging and to create 
better markets for the 
recyclable materials 
collected in cides and 
towns throughout the state. 
In closing, please 
remember that the severe 
trash dilemmas that face 
our state have not gone 
away. Our efforts for 
environmentally sound 
packaging and more 
recycling will continue. 
We urge you to join us. 

Mark Roosevelt, State 
Representative 

Myma Hewitt, League of 

Women Voters of 

Massachusetts 

Amy Perry, MASSPIRG 

For the Yes on 3 Coalition 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
The American Red 
Cross-South Area would 
like to extend a loud and 
clear "thank you" to all 
who gave in contributions, 
time and handiwork for the 
1992 Holiday Assistance 
Program. Without people 
like you, we would never 
accomplish our goal in 
serving the community. 

The holidays were 
brightened for over 1,600 
youngsters in Head Start, 
homeless shelters, and 
crisis centers, as well as 
our American Red Cross 
food clients who received 
filled Christmas stockings. 



toys, and knitted goods. 

Your heartwarming 
response and continued 
support of programs 
sponsored by the American 
Red Cross enables us to 
better serve your 

community— the South 
Shore Area. This was an 
especially difficult year for 
many, but because of the 
wonderful response from 
the public, we were able 
to accomplish our goal. 

We wish you all a most 
Happy and Peaceful 1993. 

Helen Crowley 
American Red Cross 




The U.S. Forest Service was established in 1 905, under 
President Teddy Roosevelt. 



Cont'd From Page 1 



Stephen Cantelli Sun 
'Citizen Of The Year' 



experiences and talents 
with his students. And, 
by talcing his students out 
of the classroom into the 
community getting them 
involved in projects that 
keep them interested and 
makes going to school 
fun and meaningful for 
his students. 

For example, this will 
be the sixth year his 
class will plant a large 
vegetable and flower 
garden on school grounds 
and donate all the 
produce to Father Bill's 
Shelter. 

Last year, he and his 
class won top honors 
nationwide from the 
Scholastic News in its 
"Kids Care About Their 
Community" contest. 

The class was honored 
for repairing the badly 
damaged gravestone of 
Quincy Civil War 
veteran James Ryan who 
lost his life at age 17. 

Cantelli reunited the 
Ryan family and held a 
special service for the 
young veteran at St. 
Mary's Cemetery and the 
Common St. home where 
he lived as a boy. 
Cantelli donated the 
$1,000 contest award to 
the New England Shelter 
for Homeless Veterans in 
Boston. 

Cantelli is chairman 
of the Quincy Granite 
Memorial Statue 
Committee. His classes 
have studied Quincy 's 
famed granite industry 
and are raising money to 
erect a stone monument 
in Southwest Quincy in 
memory of the many 
granite workers who once 

lived in that area and 
worked the Quincy 
granite quarries. 

Cantelli is working 
with state legislators on 
legislation his class 
initiated last Spring 
proposing a state holiday 
to be known as "John F. 
Kennedy Youth Service 
Day." His class 

successfully lobbied 
before the House 
Judiciary Committee for 
initial approval of the 
bill. 

Cantelli helps promote 
multi-culturism in the 
schools by teaching 
Spanish to l^s class. He 
has also voluntarily 
tutored children and 
adults in English and has 
helped as an interpreter 
for Quincy Hispanic 
residents. 

Promoting the 
performing arts in 
Quincy, Cantelli each 
year, directs and 
produces a show for the 
Lincoln Hancock 
community. Last June, 
his students performed in 
a play he wrote about the 
Quincy granite industry. 
The play was so well 
received he has been 
asked by families of 
former granite workers to 
repeat it. 

On Veterans Day, 
Cantelli organizes a 
party for Quincy men and 




JUDGING PANEL which selected Stephen Cantelli The Quincy Sun 1992 ^'Citizen of the 
Year," clockwise from far left: Sun Publisher Henry Bosworth; WJDA president and 
Quincy Rotarian Jay Asher; Rev. Sheldon Bennett, minister of United First Parish 
Church; Caryn Smith, owner of Caryn's Corner and member of the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional Association Board of Directors; Frank Kearns, 1991 award 
recipient; Sun Editor Robert Bosworth; John DeCarIi, chairman Board of Trust and 
past president, Quincy Sons of Italy; Quincy Police Lt. Normand Goyette; and Quincy 
City Clerk Joseph Shea. ^g„,„^ ^un photo by Tom Gorman) 



women veterans and 
Gold Star Mothers. His 
students make posters, 
write letters and learn 
about the sacrifices of 
Quincy's veterans. On 
Memorial Day, his 
classes decorate 
veterans' graves with 
flags and flowers. The 
students also bring 
Christmas gifts to 
veterans at a Boston 
shelter. 

Cantelli has organized 
and has run in an annual 
kids two-mile race 
through the streets of 
South Quincy with 
money raised going to 
Father Bill's shelter. 

Listed in Who's Who 
in American Education, 
Cantelli was selected to 
serve as an educational 
consultant for Family 
Circle magazine. Back- 



to-school articles written 
by him for parents of 
fifth-graders appeared in 
the September, 1992 
issue. 

Cantelli helps direct 
and teaches in the 
Lincoln Hancock after- 
school program providing 
after-school recreational 
activities on a regular 
basis for approximately 
100 children. 

He works for the 
Quincy Recreation 
Department during the 
summers, taking 
youngsters on "history 
hikes" of Quincy and 
Boston. 

For 12 years, he has 
volunteered to serve 
diimer once a month at 
1000 Southern Artery. 

A former co-chairman 
of the Ward 4 



Neighborhood 
Association and former 
member of the Board of 
Directors of the Quincy 
Neighborhood Housing 
Association, he was 
honored last May as the 
Southwest Quincy Person 
of The Year. 

Cantelli also teaches 
seventh-grade middle 
school CCD class 
Monday evenings at St. 
Mary's in West Quincy. 

In nominating her 
husband, Mrs. Cantelli 
said, "My husband has 
been a wonderful and 
dedicated teacher in 
Quincy for the past 21 
years. I can think of no 
finer friend of the young 
people in Quincy than he. 
I hope you will consider 
him as Quincy's Citizen 
of the Year." 



27 Other Nominees 



There were 27 other 
nominees for the 1992 
Quincy Sun Citizen of the 
Year. 

Those nominees, listed 
in alphabetical order with 
a brief description of their 
nomination, are: 

•Fr. Jack Ahern for 
unselfish dedication and 
service to people of all 
ages (St. Ann School, 
church league basketball) 
and visits to the sick and 
grieving in the parish. 

•Marilyn Birnie of 
Friends for the Unborn for 
her "extraordinary 
devotion and dedication to 
the unborn and the 
homeless." 

• Mary Centola, 
director of Beechwood 
Community Life Center's 
Elder Action program who 
has also helped establish 
meal sites and home 
delivered meal programs 
for South Shore Elder 
Services. 

•Arthur Ciampa, for 
his many years of 
dedicated service to 
Cerebral Palsy victims of 
Quincy and the South 



Shore. 

•Jake Comer:, for his 
contributions to senior 
citizens, his church, 
veterans and family needs. 

•George Crim, for 
being a thoughtful 
neighbor. 

•James Deitsch for 
displaying true American 
hospitality to guests from 
overseas. 

•Ed Fiddler, for 
producing local television 
programs as program 
director of Quincy 
Community Television 
Channel 3 since 1981. 

•Mary Hanlon, a 

retired school teacher who 
stills volunteers at the 
Merrymount School. 

•Former State Senator 
Paul Harold, who served 
the city with distinction as 
Quincy's state senator for 
14 years. 

•Rev. Cornelius J. 
Heery, pastor Sacred 
Heart Church, for helping 
so many people of all 
faiths with love and 
compassion, food and 
other necessities. 



•Barbara Johnson, 

director of the Pantry Shelf 
in WoUaston which feeds 
the hungry in Quincy and 
throughout the South 
Shore. 

•Sarah E. Keith, who 

has volunteered 21,000 
hours over 43 years to 
Quincy Hospital. 

•Edward Keohane for 
his involvement in the 
Quincy Partnership and 
many other civic groups 
and youth sports programs. 

•Roger J. Kineavy, 
founder of Our Brothers 
and Sisters Table at 
Sacred Heart Parish, North 
Quincy, a program for the 
hungry and homeless. 

•Judge Albert 

Kramer for bis 
outstanding work with the 
battered victims of 
domestic violence. 

•Sister Rita McCarthy 
and Sister Marie 
Connolly for assisting 
helpless teenage Quincy 
girls with additional care 
for 19 years. 

(ConTdonPagelO) 



Thursday, January 21, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 5 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

Fuel Rationing Said 
To Hurt War Effort 

Health Commissioner Dr. Richard M. Ash said that 
rationing of ftiel oil in Quincy was hurting rather than 
helping the war effort by creating a near epidemic of colds, 
bronchitis, pneumonia and other ills. 

"Fuel oil rationing has been carried to a dangerous point," 
he said. "The health of our ■---------->---«-'-->--------• 



Jan. 21*27 

1943 

50 Years Ago 



people depending on fuel oil 
for heat is being impaired to 
an alarming degree. 

"Anyone knows that an 
individual carmot keep in 

good health or perform nee- — ^^— ^^^— ^— '^— 
essary work when the body is numbed with cold. For good 
health the temperature should be at least 70 degrees." 

Dr. Ash said ill health brought on by cold houses may be 
keeping war workers away from their jobs. 
"If our people are not physically well, we can leave our 
planes unbuilt and our batdeships on paper," he said. 
DONAVAN NAMED COMMISIONER 
James A. Donovan, superintendent of streets for many 
years, was named to succeed Ezekiel C. Sargent as commis- 
sioner of public works, completing Mayor Charles A. Ross' 
house-cleaning of department heads. 

The only major office-holder left over from the adminis- 
tration of former Mayor Thomas S. Burgin was Health 
Commissioner Ash. 

Ross said Donovan would continue for the duration of the 
war to oversee the Street Department as part of his DPW 
duties, thus saving the superintendent's salary of $3,350 a 
year. 

FATS, CANS UNCOLLECTED 
Housewives who bad been collecting tin cans and fats for 
more than a month for the war effort were outraged when the 
trucks failed to arrive to pick them up on the j^ppointed 
MorKiay. 

D. Foster Taylor, chairman of the salvage committee, 
sharply criticized what he called a lack of cooperation on the 
part of the Highway Department. DPW Conmiissioner 
Sargent blamed inclement weather. 

"We had 2 1 ,000 calls to make and we just could not make 
them all," he said 

QUINCY-ISMS 
The Quincy Chamber of Commerce started a campaign 
against absenteeism after General Manager Edward D. 
Whiting of the Lawley shipyard said it was the biggest 
problem in war industries. . . Richard (Denny) Allen, former 
member of the patriot Ledger editorial staff, was promoted 
from private to staff sergeant at Gore Field, Great Falls, 
Mont. . . . Roasting chickens were 41 cents a pound and 
Macintosh a^jles five pounds for 29 cents at Foy 's Markets, 
1 177 Hancock St. and comer of Water and Franklin Sts.., 
Quincy Adams . . . Mayor Ross told 43 city employees to 
make arrangements to pay $14,000 in overdue bills to Qty 
Hospital in 30 days or "drastic action will be taken" . . . Mrs. 
Edward Hook of South Central Ave. was elected chairman of 
the Dyette Group at Wollaston Methodist Church . . . "For 
Me And My Gal," starring Judy Garland, George Murphy, 
Gene Kelly, Martha Eggerth and Ben Blue, was playing at 
the Strand . . . The Fore River Shipyard released the first 
pictures of the so-called "invasion ships" after three of them 
were launched in one day under the designation "special 
ships" . . . Mary Atwood was conducting classes in how to 
cook large quantities of food for use in emergencies at the 
Boston Consolidated Gas Co. office in Quincy Square ... A 
half spring chicken, southern style, was 75 cents at the 
Brown Derby, 148 Water St., where Earl Rand and his Five 
Rhythm Boys were playing for dancing . . . Princess Irina 
Skariatina spoke on "Russian Yesterday and Today" at the 
Morning Diversion of the executive board of the Quincy 
Women's Qub . . . Neils J. Nelson of the Bryan VFW Post 
was elected commander of the Quincy Veterans Council . . 
. Ersatz coffee, a compound known as "Special Victory 
Blend," containing coffee, chicory, cereal and soy beans, 
made its appearance on the shelves of Quincy grocery stores 
. . . Civil Service certified Elsie M. Parmenter, 43 Quincy 
Ave.; Anna L. Mirra, 149 Kendrick Ave.; and Elizabeth 
Carr, 144 Holbrook Rd. as eligible for appointment as 
information clerk at City Hospital at a salary of $14 a week 
. . . Men's $24.50 suits were selling for $18.38 during a 
clearance sale at The L&vns Store, 1454 Hancock St. . . . 
Librarian Galen Hill, chairman of the Quincy Victory Book 
Campaign, appealed for books for servicemen. 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 21, 1993 




Marie's 
Kitchen 



By MARIE J. D'OLIMPIO 



Dell's Magic Breakfast 



What about making breakfast at 
night? My friend Dell's recipe for a 
delicious breakfast does just that. It's a 
family favorite of hers according to her 
daughter, Karen. And a lot easier than 
trying to cook bacon and ham while 
making eggs "over easy" and toast. 

Dell's Magic All-In-One Breakfast 

1 pound bacon 

1 half pound ham (thick sliced and 
cut up) 

about 2 tablespoons scallions 

1 half pound fresh mushrooms (or 
canned equivalent) 

slices of bread to line a 9 x 13 
baking dish 



1 medium green pepper (cut up) 
some oil or margarine for saute 
12 eggs (beaten) 

Saute the onion, mushrooms and 
green pepper. Set aside. Cook the 
bacon (cook mine in the microwave) and 
ham. Beat the eggs and set aside. 

In a slightly greased baking dish, Une 
it with sUces of bread. Add the bacon, 
ham and onion mixture. On top of that, 
pour the beaten eggs. Bake in a 350 
degree oven uncovered for 45 minutes. 
Cool for a few minutes and then cut into 
squares. Serve with a side of homefries 
if desired. This recipe feeds from 6 to 8 
people depending on the appetite! 



Valentine Party For 
AARP Weekend Chapter 



The Quincy-Braintree 
AARP Weekend Chapter 
will meet Sunday, Feb. 7 
at 2 p.m. at the Townbrook 
House, 45 Brackett St., 



Quincy. 



A St. Valentine Party 
will be held. 

Refreshments will be 
served. Everyone over 50 
is invited. 

An Acupuncture 




U.5. SAVINGS BONOS 



Demonstration-Lecture is 
scheduled for March 7. A 
Panel Lecture by a priest, 
minister and rabbi will be 
held April 4. 

Those attending are 
asked to bring discarded 
hearing aids and 
eyeglasses for the needy. 
For more information call 
Ernest Aristide at 472- 
6312. 



Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St., Quincy Center 
Video Duplication 
Special This Week 

Share Your Taped 
Holiday Memories 

472-7131 




WOLLASTON GARDEN CLUB recently sponsored the Wollaston HUls neighborhood 
children's performance of Christmas carols for residents of Robbins House 
Convalescent Home on Elm St., Quincy. Front row, fk-om left, Jennie Caley, Nathan 
Egan, Eaizabeth McEvoy, Elizabeth Caley, Kerrianne Vialpando, Joey Vialpando, Chris 
Tufo. Back row, Joshua Egan, Anthony Tufo, Mike Mitchell, Justhi Kileu, Kristen 
Greene, CoUn Maxle, Katie McEvoy, Dan Tufo and Patrick Maxie. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Quincy VNA Recruiting 
Applicants For Training Program 

The Hospice of the 9 p.m. at the Adams emotional support for 
Quincy Visiting Nurse Building, 13S4 Hancock terminally ill patients and 



Association, Inc. is 
recruiting applicants for its 
eight-week Volunteer 
Training Program 
beginning Feb. 8 tit)m 6 to 



St., Quincy. 



their families. 



Volunieer For more information 

responsibilities include call Heidi Turner at 472- 
befriending and providing 



2828. 



7 Residents On UMass/Dartmouth 
Chancellor's, Dean's Lists 



Seven Quincy residents 
have been named to either 
the Chancellor's List or 
Dean's List at the 
University of 

Massachusetts at 
Dartmouth. 



The students and their 



majors are: 

Chancellor's 



List: 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



Susan E. Egan, 
psychology; Evangelos 
Kyranis, finance. 

Dean's List: Katherine 
E. Callahan, mathematics; 
Erin L. McNaught, 
political science and 
sociology; Anne M. 



O'Sullivan, painting; 
Suzanne E. Rochon, 
marketing; Tina L. 
Skerritt, political science. 

Chancellor's List 
students must maintain a 
grade point average of at 
least 3.8, and Dean's List 
students a grade point 
average of at least 3.2, out 
of a possible 4.0. 



Nantucket Lightship 
Friends Meeting Tonight 




The Friends of the 
Nantucket Lightship will 
meet tonight (Thursday) at 
7 p.m. at the Marina Bay 
Sandwich Shop, 500 
Victory Rd., Marina Bay, 



Squantum. 

The Friends group is 
looking for volunteers to 
help restore the lightship 
to a floating museum. 



RECEPTION HALLS 



ISTYUSH120-SEATEF 

DBOOVERDNEAR 

MARMABAY. 

THOUGHT TO BE 

AMBJA'S. 

The Mtrct's out 

Iyte functton room at Amelia's | 
has bwonw one of Boston's 
most popular spots lor wed- 
dtngs, shouivs, corporate 
J meet in gs, and get togethen 
' of all kinds. VUe feature an 
extensive menu at affordable | 
prices. We overlook Mariru 
Bay and the Boston skyline. 
We'd like to make your next 
functxxi really fly 

Ptcasc call 617471 1453. B 




'KtoiV Rd- No Quincy, MAI 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

SpBcializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



MUSIC 



LIVE MUSIC 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Art Perry, His Saxophone 

and Orchestra 

Featuring 

Music of the 30s and 40s 

843-7878 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



TRAVEL 



HONEYMOON 

IN ROMANTIC SCOTLAND 

■* Castle or Cottage* 

Scottish Connections 

304 Victory Rd., Marina Bay 

(.1 7-770-41 72 2/4 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography , 
Mcintif%,,,,, 

679 Hancock Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6888 



Quincy 

Choral Society 

Chamber Chorus 

479-2061 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



JEWELRY 



I^OLSOn Rne Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family Al - Dave - Mar1< 

730 HANCOCK ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 



Our Policy On 

Engagement Photographs 

And Wedding Announcements 



togiaipbs with €pg^aiMSDt asoxwiiceflieots ays..^ 
always lura. 

The Sam will «Ih> <;<HUimie to use In weddj^..^ 
aaa<yuncemests.die names of all satmbexs of ti^' 
weddmg paity includuig maid ofisatiioiiadKMior^ ^ 
hm mm^ parettts^ Imdesmaids, adiacs^ t^swet- 

We mvhe eitgftged c<yitple» id sclaxus Qas^'i 
phon&s with tiidr anm»incemestt6«»vl wltetk soth 
sUlttng their weddlagplK^ tolndttdle acconplete^ | 
iisting of tbe wedding party. ^"^ 

Black and wMt^photos are prefeired The Stm 
can coavert mo^ color pbm& to black m^ vMi& 
for $Hibhcati<ai hot the photo loses some clarity ifl 

We suggest that when you have your engage- 
ment photo taken, you request the studio to send a 
copy to The Sun with ihe reaniader that The Sun is 
continuing its policy of publishing engagem«it 
photos. 

The Son also publishes articles and photos of 
wedding anniveTsaries beginning with the 25th 
anniversary. 

And, as in the past, there is no charge. 



ThiirMfav, January 21, 1993 Quincy Suo Page 7 




Social 



YUKLING SO of Quincy receives the Chancellor's 
Scholarship for Excellence at the University of 
Massachusetts in Boston from UMass Chancellor Sherry 
H. Penney at a recent awards dinner at the Harbor 
Campus. The schobrship is a full, four-year award that 
covers the cost of tuition and fees at the university. It is 
given in recognition of outstanding academic 
achievement, or excellence in the arts or distinguished 
accomplishment in public and community service. So, a 
transfer from Quincy College, is studying liberal arts at 
UMass/Boston. 

WoUaston Mother's Club 
To Hear Interior Decorator 



The Wollaston Mother's 
Club will meet Thursday, 
Jan. 28, at 11:30 a.m. at 
Wollaston Congregational 
Church, Lincoln and 
Winthrop Ave.'s. 

Hostess for the 11:30 
a.m. luncheon will be Mrs. 
Pat Spring of the 
Reception Committee. 

Mrs. Terry Dempsey 
will conduct a brief 
business meeting prior to 



the feature program. 
Lorraine Callahan of 
Home Interior Decorators 
will present a program on 
decorating ideas and will 
have samples for purchase. 





GIOVANNI CACCIATORE and KRISTINE PICARSKI 

(Pagar Studios) 

Kristine Picarski Engaged 
To Giovanni Cacciatore 



Members are reminded 
of their DOVE donations. 

New members are 
welcome and babysitting 
is available for a small 
fee. 



MR. and MRS. THOMAS PIERCE 

(Pagar Studios) 

Gail Stack Married 
To Thomas Pierce 



Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Picarski Jr. of Quincy 
announce the engagement 
of their daughter, Kristine, 



Rice Eventide Meeting Jan. 25 



William B. Rice 
Eventide Home, 215 

Adams St., will hold an 
auxiliary meeting Monday, 
Jan. 25 at 2 p.m. 



The program will 
include a business 
meeting, a slide show 
presented by Robert and 
Maijorie Fall, and a social 
hour. 



Cerebral Palsy Brunch 
At Sons Of Italy Jan. 24 



A Cerebral Palsy 
Brunch will be held 
Sunday, Jan. 24 from 10 
a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Sons 



St., Quincy. 
Donation is $5. 



Amanda Young On 
Fitchburg Dean's List 



Amanda Young of 
Squantum was named to 
the Dean's List at 
Fitchburg State College, 
School of Nursing, for the 
first semester. 



11 From Quincy On 
Massasoit Dean's List 



Massasoit Community 
College, Brockton, hsts 11 
Quincy residents on its 
Fall 1992 Dean's List. 

They are: 

Anthony Bianco, Mark 
Carboni, Gina DiBona, 



Mr., Mrs. Chris Shaughnessy 
Parents Of Daughter 

Mr. and Mrs. Chris Weymouth. 
Shaugnessy, 14 Endicott 
St., Quincy, are parents of 
a daughter, Jaimie Lee, 
born Dec. 27 at South 
Shore Hospital in 

Smy Qm and Mon«y 
Shop Locally 



Gail M. Stack, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. 
Stack of Quincy, was 
recently married to 
Thomas I. Pierce. He is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Irwin 
C. Pierce of Carolina, R.I. 
The Nuptial Mass was 
celebrated at St. Ann's 
Church in Wollaston and 
officiated by Rev. Jose 
Gomez of Houston, Texas, 
a longtime friend of the 
bride and groom. A 
reception followed at The 
Barker Tavern in Scituate. 
The bride was given in 
of Italy Lodge, 120 Quarry marriage by her father. 

Janine Gray of Quincy 
served as Matron of Honor. 
Bridesmaids were 
Margaret Stack of 
Hingham and Catherine 
Stack of Norwell, sisters- 
in-law of the bride; 
Melissa Pierce of 
Carolina, R.I., sister of the 
groom; Kit Curcio of 
Stamford, Conn.; and Julie 
Slater of Cambridge. 
Flower Girl was Caroline 
Stack of Braintree, niece 
of the bride. 

Keith Pierce of 
Carolina, R.I. served as 
Best Man for his brother. 

Ushers were Brian 
Stack of Hingham and 
Paul Stack of Norwell, 
brothers of the bride; and 
Jeffrey White, Christopher 
Lee and Richard 
Anderson, all of Silver 
Spring, Md. Ring Bearer 
was Daniel Stack of 
Waltham, nephew of the 
bride. 



The bride, a graduate of 
Boston College and 
Georgetown University, is 
an education specialist. 

The groom, a graduate 
of The American 
University in Washington, 
D.C., is currently a 
doctoral candidate at 
Boston College. 

Following a wedding 
trip to Quebec City, the 
newlyweds are living in 
Hingham. 



Miss Picarski is a 
graduate of Quincy High 
School and Quincy 
College. 

Mr. Cacciatore is a 
graduate of Quincy High 
School. 

A March 27 wedding is 
planned. 



to Giovanni Cacciatore. 
He is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Alfonso Cacciatore of 
Quincy. 

Ann Kenny Graduates 
From Simmons College 

Ann Kenny of Lenox library 
St., Quincy, recently 
{graduated from the 
Simmon.^; College 
Graduate School of Library 
and Information Science, 
Boston. 

She received a master 
of science degree 



m 



and information 
science. She previously 
earned a bachelor's degree 
from Lake Erie College, 
Ohio. 

Kenny is employed as a 
librarian for Ernst and 
Young. She is the daughter 
of Hugh and Ellen Kenny. 



Young, a sophomore, 
has a 3.51 grade point 
average. She is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lester Young of 36 
Winslow Road. 



Michelle Disher, Nicole 
LoPorto, Geraldine 
Muncey, Susan 

Summering-Clark, Jody 
McCoy, David Sheridan, 
William Stever and 
Matthew O'Toole. 



Seton OB/GYN Associates 

of 

St. Margaret's /St. Elizabeth's 

announces the opening of the 

Roslindale office with 

Paul ]. Hull, MD and 

Shah Naderi, MD, MPH 

New patients are now being accepted. 

Please call 617-323-1084. 
1 Corinth Street, Roslindale 



Russell Edward's 



ne 



BALLOONS & STUFF 



690 HANCOCK ST. 

WOLLASTON 

773-0690 



ASK FOR THE $29.95 
BALLOON DELIVERY 



u'.».'.i.'.i.'.i.'.i.vi.'.i. ' . i.'. i. i .i.i. i .». i .t. i .t.t.i.;.iji,[,;;TCT;T; 




Winfield 
Gift Emporium 



AFTER CHRISTMAS 
CLEARANCE 
25-50% OFF 
Selected Items 
Hours: Tues-Sat 10:00 am-5:00 pm 
Sunday 12-5 • Closed Monday 
853 Hancock St., Quincy 479-9784 



A full service hair salon 

MONDAY 

Women's Special $20.00 

TUES&THURS 

Men's Special $13.00 

WEDNESDAY 
Perm Special 

Starting at $42.00 



Starting at $42.00 

All specials include wash, cut and blowdry. 

Long hair slightly higher 



Nail Tipping & Overlay $60 
Sculptured Nails $60 

Pedicures $25 



Body & Facial Waxing Available 

We carry a full line of tiair care products 

REDKEN KMS ^^MS ^slmichell ymatfix 




472-1060 

Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts., 1 Maple St., Quincy 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 21, 1993 



Arts/Entertainment 



Quincy Partnership 

^Almost Valentine's Day' 

Fundraiser Feb. 11 



< • I 



M i I M M I t M 



1 I 



» < I I ( t 



The Quincy Partnership, 
Inc. will hold an "Almost 
Valentine's Day" 
reception and fundraiser 
Thursday, Feb. 11 at the 
Atrium in President's 

Place, Quincy Sq. from 6 
to 9 p.m. 

There will be music, 
food and a cash bar. 
Donations are $25 per 
person. 

The funds will be used 
to complete the 
manufacture and purchase 
of 12 wooden colonial- 
style "Welcome to 
Quincy" signs. Two signs 
have already been 



installed: West Squantum 
St. and Hancock St. near 
Neponset Circle. 

Tickets may be 
purchased at the following 
locations: Barry's Deli, 21 
Beale St., Wollaston; 
Curry Hardware, 370 
Copeland St., West 
Quincy and 53 Billings 
Rd., North Quincy; and 
Rogers Jewelry, 1402 
Hancock St., Quincy 
Center. 

The Quincy Partnership 
is a group of Quincy 
business people and 
residents committed to 
including Quincy 's quality 
of life. All monies raised 



are donated to Partnership 
projects which help 
Quincy. 

The Partnership's first 
project raised funds to 
purchase outside flood 
lights for four of Quincy 's 
historical buildings: Crane 
Library, Adams Academy, 
Old City Hall, and United 
First Parish Church 
(Church of the Presidents). 

For more information 
regarding the "Almost 
Valentine's Day" 
reception or the Quincy 
Partnership, call Maureen 
Rogers at the South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce, 
479-1111. 




Winter Art Classes Begin Jan. 24 



MERRYMOUNl SCHOOL STUDENTS presented a play on the "Constitution," 
clironicling its inception througli its signing more ttian 200 years ago. Front row, from 
left, James Mateu, Nusra Vivatyukan, Katie Jellison, Matt Graham, Andrea Bondarick, 
Steptianie Allen, Laurie Cesario, Mike Feeley. Back, Allison Jones, Aimee DuBois, Jill 
Miller, Samantha Cohen, Tiffany Linn, Holly Archer, Amy Gordan, John DelTufo, 
Jessica Sprague, and faculty member Lisa Vallantini. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 



Winter classes at the 
Quincy Ait Association, 26 
High School Ave., begin 
Jan. 24. 

Classes include all 
phases of drawing, 
painting, and oriental rug 
making. Children's classes 
include paper sculpting, 
cartooning, and more. 

Workshops are also 
scheduled including, 
Nantucket Basket, Jan. 30 



^CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 
1/22-1/27 



SCENT OF A 
WOMAN (R) 

12:1»4:30-7«>-10«5 

HEXED (R) 

12m- 2:15 -4^5- 7:20- 1(M0 
FRI* SAT ONLY 12:20 AM 

■^ ASPEN 
EXTREME (PG-13) 

1 1 :4S - 2:10 - 4:38 - 7:10 • «« 
FRIASATONLY 12:15 AM 



and Feb. 9; Jewelry 
Making, Feb. 10; 
Watercolor Landscapes, 
Feb. 13; and Quilt in a 



Day. 

Gift certificates are 
available. Call for a free 
brochure, 770-2482. 



Thomas Galvin Tq Speak On 
Boston Gear History At Historical Society 



Quincy Art Association 
Meeting, Demonstration Feb. 9 



The monthly meeting of 
the Quincy Art Associa- 
tion, 26 High School Ave., 
will be held Tuesday, Feb. 
9 at 7:30 p.m. 

The public is welcome 
to join or watch a "hands 



on" demonstration. 
Participants should bring a 
paintbrush and a few oil 
paints in order to join the 
multi-artist painting. 

For information call 
770-2482. 



Rummage Sale Feb. 5-6 
At Christ Church 



Thomas Galvin, a vice 
president at Boston Gear, 
will discuss the company's 
history at a meeting of ih& 
Quincy Historical Society, 
Thursday, Jan. 28 at 7:30 
p.m., at the Adams 
Academy, 8 Adams St. 

Boston Gear, founded in 
Charlestown in the late 
1870s, relocated to Norfolk 
Downs in Quincy in 1905. 
The firm has made 
numerous contributions to 



American industry, 
including early innovations 

that helped make 
standardization and mass 
production possible. 

As one of the leading 
businesses in Quincy, its 
story is interwoven with 
that of the city on many 
levels. Thousands of 
Quincy residents have 
worked there. 

Calvin's presentation 
will be illustrated with 
slides showing scenes from 



tum-of-the-century Quincy 
and of Boston Gear's 
development, major 
projects and present 
operation. 

Galvin, a trustee of the 
Historical Society, has 
undertaken leadership 
roles with many 
community organizations, 
including South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce, 
Quincy Rotary Club, 
Quincy Partnership and 
Quincy 2000. 



Christ Church, 12 
Quincy Ave., will hold a 
Rummage Sale Friday, 
Feb. 5 from 7 to 9 p.m. and 
Saturday, Feb. 6 from 9 
a.m. to 1 p.m. 



The event is being 
sponsored by the Women's 
Guild. 

For more information 
call 773-0310 or 773-8432. 



Beechwood Center 



BODY OF 
EVIDENCE (R) 

1 1 « -2:15 - 4d0 - 7:25 - 10:00 
FWI t »AT ONLY 12:15 AM 

'the BODYGUARD (R)] 

1 2:30 -3:40 -7M- 0:90 
FRI* SAT ONLY 12.10 AM 



AUVE(R) 

12aO-3:15-7:15-7:15-9S0 
FRI* SAT ONLY 12:19 AM 



|A FEW GOOD MEN (R)] 

12:2s- 3:25- 7K)0.««0 
FRI It SAT ONLY 12:15 AM 

NOWHERE TO RUN (R)' 

1 2:00-2:2(M:30-7:3fr«:S5 
FRI t SAT ONLY 12:10 AM 



MUPPET CHRISTMAS 
CAROL (R) 

11A>-2:20-l}40 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Show/s 

$3.75 

773-5700 



IT'S TIME TO LAUGH - A LOT!! 
QUINCY DINNER THEATRE 

MASONIC BLDG - 1170 HANCOCK ST. 

South Shore's Outstanding Professional Theatre 

presents 

"LOVE, SEX, 

andtheI.R.S." 

Six performances 
Jan23-24 29-30 Feb6-7 

Fri -I- Sat Full Course Dinner + Show - 29.95 
Sunday - Jan 23 - Italian Buffet + Show - 24.95 

SHOW TICKETS - 12.00 - ALL PERFORMANCES 

♦SPECIAL SENIOR DISCOUNTS - FRI + SUNDAYS 

Reservations & Information 

843-5862 



Thurs., Jan. 21: Blood 

pressure screening, 10- 

11:30 a.m.; Pre-luncheon 

exercise, 11:15 a.m.; 

Lunch (call for 

reservations), 11:45 a.m.; 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's i chance to earn 
extra money by iMillding a 
Oulncy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Movies (second and fourth 
Thursday each month), 50 
cents, 1 p.m. 

Alzheimer's Support 
Group (third Thursday of 
the month), 2 and 7 p.m.; 
Multiple Sclerosis Support 
(fourth Thursday of the 
month), 7 p.m. 

Fri., Jan. 22: Walking 
Club (3 miles) with 
Nancy, 9 a.m.; Gentle 



Walk (both walks start 
from Beechwood), 10 a.m.; 
Easy-Does-It dance/exer- 
cise with instructor Gini 
Waterman. Six-week 
session (began Jan. 8), 

call for information, 10:15- 
11 a.m.; Co-ed Volleyball, 
cost $2, 11:15 a.m. to 
12:45 p.m.; Line Dancing 
with Rita Sanford, cost $3, 
1-2:30 p.m. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14 BEALE ST 773^600 



Wed & Thurs Jan 20+21 

Robin Williams 

•T0YS"(PG-13) 

A Fantasy Comedy 

Eve's 7:00 only 



Starts Fri Jan 22 

Jack Nicholson 

"HOFFA" (R) 

An Adult Drama 

Fri & Sat 7:00 only 

Sun - Thurs 7:00 only 



Mon & Tues Dollar Night 



ALL SEATS $3.00 






Valentine's Bas 

Sat. Feb. 13 at 8pm 
Brandy Pete's 
267 Franklin St., Boston 
D.J. STEVE KAVANAGH 

Music for all Occasions 

'Music for people who take their fun seriously!" 

Call 773-4936 



■■ mmTB 





uccif^^ PHisterSUB 




Pizza - Pasta - Subs 

Syrians - Salads 

Dine In or Carry Out, or Delivered 



62-64 Billings Road, No. Quincy, MA 02171 
Hot Line 328-9764 • 328-0266 FAX 786-9792 



1 



I 



HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES & PIES 

"There's No Taste 
Like Homemade" 

6SA Bllllngt Rd. 
N. Quincy. MA 

472-8558 



I 



.- n^* ■ » r 




Thursday, January 21, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Quincy Recreation Ceramic 
Classes Begin Jan. 27 



Instructional ceramic 
classes for Quincy boys 
and girls, ages eight 
through middle school, are 
being offered by the 
Quincy Recreation Dept. 

Registration will be 
held during the first class. 
The 10- week classes are 



conducted on Wednesdays 
from 3 to 4:30 p.m. or 
Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 
10:30 a.m. or 10:30 a.m. to 
noon. Cost is $12. 

Basic and intermediate 
instruction in painting, 
glazing, staining, and 
cleaning of ceramic 



greenware are included. 
Classes will be held at the 
Dawes Memorial Estate, 
Channing St. and Quincy 
Shore Dr. (opposite 
Squantum Yacht Club). 

For information call 
376-1386. 



TWO SPRUCE TREES presented by The Boston Five to the city of Quincy have been 
planted outside Veterans Memorial Stadium. Elspeth Brown, manager of the bank's 
Quincy branches and Raymond Cattaneo, executive director of Quincy's Parks, Forestry 
and Cemeteries, are shown with one of the trees. 

Boston Five Presents 
Two Spruce Trees To City 



The Boston Five 
recently presented two 
small Spruce trees to the 
city of Quincy. 

The trees, which were 
part of the decor on The 
Boston Five float in the 



Quincy Christmas Parade, 
have been planted outside 
Veterans Memorial 
Stadium on Hancock St. 

Elspeth Brown, 
manager of the bank's 
Quincy branch offices 



said, "We wanted to make 
sure that the trees were 
replanted after the parade." 
The Boston Five has 
two Quincy branches at 
Presidents Place, Quincy 
Square, and 77 Granite St. 



Donald McNamara Science 
'Teacher Of The Year' 



Donald McNamara, a 
high school biology 
teacher in Somerset, 
Mass., was recently named 
high school science 
teacher of the year by 
Sigma Xi of the University 
of Massachusetts- 
Dartmouth. 

McNamara is married 
to the former Valerie Pepe 



of Quincy. McNamara's father- in- 

He was selected for the *aw, Nicholas Pepe, is a 
award from among 22 partner in Pepe, Pelletier 



candidates throughout the 
state. 



& McSbane, Inc., 
Quincy CPA firm. 



NEWSCARRIER.S 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



WANTED 

Jewelry - Any Condition, Scrap Gold & Platinum 

Sterling Silverware - Any Condition 

Old wristwatches and pocket watches 

Broken Gold Rings Chains - Bracelets 

Diamonds - Any Size 

TOP PRICES PAID 

QUINCY JEWELRY 

543 Washington St. Quincy, Rt. 3A 
773-1501 Closed Sun. & Men. 




OPEN DAILY AT 11 AM 
QUINCY 328-6801 N. QUINCY 472-9191 




Mark C. Jaehnig D.C. 

Wishes to announce 
the relocation of his 
chiropractic ojfice to 

110 Billings Road 

North Quincy MA 02171 

If you have any questions or would like to 

make an appointment please call Dr. Mark 

Jaehnig at Quincy Chiropractic Office 

773-4400 
We are accepting new patients at this time. 




ATTENTION QUINCY RESIDENTS 
LOANS & GRANTS!! 

City of Quincy 

Loan and Grant Programs Offered 

through the 
Office of Housing Rehabilitation 

At the present time, the following loan and grant programs are 
offered through the Office of Housing Rehabilitation, a line office of 
the Department of Planning and Community Development. 

Housing Rehabilitation Loan Program: 

The program is intended to eliminate substandard living conditions 
by making necessary home improvements in accordance with 
program guidelines. 

The program offers loans of up to $10,000 per dwelling unit with a 
maximum of $20,000 for two to four units. The interest rate is fixed 
at 5% and the terms of the loan can be up to 15 years. 
Owner-occupied one to four unit dwellings are eligible dwelling 
types. Owners of these dwellings must meet the moderate income 
guidelines of the program. 

De-leading Loan Program: 

This program offers 5% loans to all Quincy residents to remove lead 
paint from one to four unit dwellings. There are no income 
guidelines and the property does not have to be owner-occupied. 
The maximum loan allowed and terms are the same as the Housing 
Rehabilitation Loan Program. 

Housing Rehabilitation Grant Program: 

The objective of this program is the same as the Housing 
Rehabilitation Loan Program. This program, however, is open to 
only those homeowners meeting the low income guidelines of the 
program. Grants (no repayment) up to $10,000. 

All programs offered through the Office of Housing Rehabilitation 
comply with the City of Quincy's policy on Fair Housing. 

"The City of Quincy hereby states that it is the policy of the City to 
ensure that each individual shall have equal opportunity in the 
access to all housing within its boundaries, and to prohibit 
discrimination in housing on the grounds of race, color, national 
origin, ancestry, age, religion, marital status, sex, income, or 
handicap." 



To request information, please call or visit: 



ttr 

touAi Housiw; 
LENDER 



OFFICE OF HOUSING REHABILITATION 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

1305 HANCOCK STREET, 3rd FLOOR (OLD CITY HALL) 

QUINCY. MA 02169 

Telephone: 376-1055 



J 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 21, 1993 



Obituaries 



Paul J. Gauthier, 11 

Lincoln-Hancock Fourth Grader 

A funeral Mass for Paul Although some thought 

J. Gauthier, 11, of Quincy. ^ ^°"^^ ^ ^^^^ °^ ^»* 

was celebrated Tuesday in P^^ate instruction, Paul's 

St. Boniface Church. parents were advised that 

He died Jan. 15 at ^^ ^°"'^ succeed at a 



The Rev. Bruce B. Noyes, 75 

Served At St. Chrysostom's Church; 
Hospital Chaplain; Worked With Alcoholics 



Michael J. Carney Sr., 81 

Retired Tool And Die Maker; Worked 
40 Years For Pneumatic Scale 



Quincy Hospital. 

A fourth grade student 



public school, so he was 
enrolled at Lincoln- 



at the Lincoln-Hancock Hancock. 
School, he was bom in ^ast Christmas, Paul's 
Boston and raised in wheelchair became the 
Quincy. In spite of engine for a train of four 
multiple handicaps that ^^^^ ^"'' ^^ g^f^s. He 
required him to use a P^udly drove the train 
wheelchair, he was around the school 
outgoing and well-known gymnasium at the winter 
in his community. celebration party. 

He particularly enjoyed ^o° "^ P^^P Gauthier 
a trip to Disney World, ^^^ Shirley (Smith) 
arranged for him through Gauthier, he is also 
the Make-A-Wish survived by a sister. Donna 
Foundation by Lois M- Gauthier of Quincy. 
Blowers, his tutor last Burial was in St. 
year, and Carol Shiffer, his Joseph's Cemetery, West 
physical therapist. Roxbury. 

Paul received an award Funeral arrangements 
from the Quincy Police ^^""^ ''y ^^^ Sweeney 
Athletic League last year. Funeral Home, 74 Elm St. 

Julia F. Roach, 78 

Former Stop & Shop Clerk 

A funeral Mass for Julia Roach; a son, Edward P. 



F. "June" (Shea) Roach, 
78, of Concord, N.H., 
formerly of North Quincy 
and Norwell, was 
celebrated Jan. 16 in 
Sacred Heart Church. 

Mrs. Roach died Jan. 13 
in Concord after a long 
illness. 

A former clerk for Stop 
& Shop in South Boston, 
she worked there for 20 
years. She retired 14 years 
ago. 

Bom in Boston, she 
lived in Norwell and in 
North Quincy before 
moving to Concord four 
years ago. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Edward P. 



R.E. PAPILE CO. 

1 546 Hancock St., Quincy 

Memonal Gifts, Perpetuals, 

Plaques, Engraving, Prayer Cards. 

Let us assist you on all your 

memorial needs. 

471-0222 



Roach Jr. of Hampstead, 
N.H.; three daughters, 
Mary Ann Gilbrook of 
Roswell, Ga., Maureen 
Baldini of Epson, N.H., 
and Claire Nickerson of 
Danvers; a brother, Walter 
Shea of Duxbury; four 
sisters, Jean McCarthy of 
Dorchester, Arm Schuler of 
Rockland, and Gertrude 
Shea and Marguerite 
Foley, both of North 
Quincy; and eight 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in 
Washington St. Cemetery, 
Norwell. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home. 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the New Hampshire 
Kidney Center Patient 
Service Fund, 2 Fisk Rd., 
Concord, NH 03301. 




SCOTT DFWARE 



A THOUGHT 
FOR THE WEEK 



W* are all f orttf ImI by tra- 
dition*. They play an important 
part in our lives. Traditions 
provide patterns on wlilcit we 
can depend and tiiey give us 
security , a sense of lieiong ing . 
A tradition is more tlian Just somettiing that lias 
lieen hianded down. It comes from the Iteart. A tradition 
is something that you l>elleve in dearly and would liice 
to see tuinded down to your children. 

Granted, In our iiectic way of life today, some of tlie 
traditional ways of doing things cannot iielp but to be 
changed. However, some of them can. 

Traditions are Important to ail of us and most of 
them have helped us to grow, and even mai(e us think 
a little more. So I ask you, l>efore changbig, or even 
eliminating your traditions, conskler how much tliey 
liave affected you and what you have learned from 
them. It might just change your mind... 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the 'New England Funeral Trust' 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Sen/irs'^ Rendered to Any Distance 



A funeral service for the 
Rev. Bruce B. Noyes, 75, 
of Quincy, was held Jan. 
15 in St. Chrysostom's 
Church. 

The Rev. Noyes died 
Jan. 1 1 at Quincy Hospital. 

An Episcopal priest, he 
was interim priest in 
charge at St. Chrysostom's 
in Quincy in 1968 and 
1969 and worked in 
several other parishes, but 
his primary ministry was 
as a hospital chaplain. 

He also worked 
extensively with 

alcoholics and as a 
teacher. 

A graduate of Indiana 
University and already 
married and the father of 
one child in 1942, he 
began a 12-year military 
career in the Army. After 
earning four battle stars in 
Europe he remained in the 
Army and his unit, the 3rd 
Battalion of the 8th 
Cavalry Regiment, was 
among the first attacked 
when Red Chinese forces 
joined the North Korea 
fight. 

In 1953 he ended his 
military career and began 
studying for the priesthood, 
attending Episcopal 
Theological School in 
Cambridge. He was 
already working at St. 
James Episcopal Church in 
Groveland when he was 
awarded his master of 
divinity degree in 1956. He 
later served churches in 
Quincy, Watertown, 
Canton and Fall River. 

He served as chaplain 
and chaplain supervisor at 
Long Island, New England 
Deaconess, New England 



Baptist, Children's, 
Lemuel Shattuck, Boston 

State and Massachusetts 
General Hospitals, all in 
Boston, from 1%8 to 1975. 

In 1970, working with 
the Community 

Association Serving 
Alcoholics, he suggested 
the need for an 
organization to 

recommend medical and 
psychological help for 
alcoholics and was given 
the task of forming it. He 
started the Alcoholics 
Referral Information 
Service and soon had 80 
volunteers helping. 

In 1982, he returned to 
Korea as a guest of the 
Korean Veterans 

Association to be 
presented with a medal 
and a proclamation. 

He was born in 
Somerville. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Maijorie (Combie) 
Noyes; three sons, David 
B. Noyes of New Jersey, 
Stephen W. Noyes of 
Colorado and Christopher 
P. Noyes of Dracut; two 
daughters, Marcia 
Curlezon of Maine and 
Lynne Conover of 
Abington; a brother, 
Robert Noyes of 
Framingham; and 10 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Glenwood 
Cemetery, Everett. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Organ Repair Fund, 
St. Chrysostom's Church, 1 
Linden St., Quincy, MA 
02170. 



Roslyn A. Gifford, 88 



A funeral service for 
Roslyn A. (Mednicov) 
Gifford, 88, of Quincy, was 
held Jan. 14 in the Hamel, 
Wickens and Troupe 
Funeral Home, 26 Adams 
St. 

Mrs. Gifford died Jan. 
1 1 at Quincy Hospital after 
a period of failing health. 

She was a member of 
Bethany Congregational 
Church and a former 
worthy matron of the Order 
of the Eastern Star. 

Born and raised in 
Stoughton, she graduated 
from Stoughton High 
School and Burdett 



Business College. 

She lived in Quincy for 
58 years. 

Wife of the late Irvin B. 
Gifford, she is survived by 
a son, Curtis M. Gifford of 
Quincy; a daughter, 
Sharon G. Gifford of 
Quincy; and two 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Melrose 
Cemetery, Brockton. 

Donations may be made 
to the Bethany 
Congregational Church 
Scholarship Fund, 18 
Spear St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 



A funeral Mass for 
Michael J. Carney Sr, 81, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 15 in Sacred Heart 
Church. 

Mr. Carney died Jan. 12 
at Quincy Hospital. 

A retired tool and die 
maker, he worked 40 years 
at Pneumatic Scale on 
Newport Ave. before 
retiring in 1976. He started 
there as a sweeper and 
worked his way up to tool 
and die maker. 

He was an enthusiastic 
swimmer for many years. 

A sports enthusiast, he 
enjoyed viewing Red Sox 
games at Fenway Park. 
Another of his favorite 
pastimes was hitting a golf 
ball around the old 
Montclair Field, although 
he never formally took up 
the game. 

He also enjoyed penny 
ante card games. 

A member of the Castle 
Island Association in 



South Boston, be used to 
enjoy roaming the island 
area. 

A former member of the 
Knights of Columbus in 
North Quincy, he attended 
Quincy schools. 

Husband of the late 
Margaret (Arbuckle) 
Carney, he is survived by 
three sons, Michael 

"Jack" Carney Jr. and 
Ronald J. Carney, both of 
Quincy, and Gregory T. 
Carney of Abington; two 
brothers, Francis Carney of 
Roslindale and William 
Carney of Quincy; two 
sisters, Susan Hughes of 
Quincy and Katherine 
Carney of Weymouth; 
seven grandchildren, and 
three great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mt. 
WoUaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



Marilyn E. Graham, 67 

Retired Hospital Head Nurse 



A funeral Mass for 
Marilyn E. (MacDonald) 
Graham, 67, of Squantum, 
was celebrated Jan. 16 in 
Star of the Sea Church. 

Mrs. Graham died Jan. 
12 at Quincy Hospital. 

A retired registered 
nurse, she was a former 
head nurse of the 
obstetrics unit at Quincy 
City Hospital. 

Bom in Boston, she was 
educated in Quincy 
schools and the Quincy 
City Hospital School of 
Nursing. The hospital was 
later renamed Quincy 
Hospital. 

She was a summer 
resident of Tuftonboro, 
N.H. for many years. 



She is survived by her 
husband, William A. 
Graham; a daughter, 
Michelle C. Graham of 
Squantum; and a brother, 
George J. MacDonald of 
Denver, Colo. She was the 
sister of the late Qaire F. 
Donovan. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Heart 
Association, 486 Forest 
Ave., Brockton, MA 
02401. 



Olinda Lange, 77 

Worked At Quincy Hospital 



A funeral Mass for 
Olinda (Durante) Lange, 
77, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Jan. 14 in St. 
John's Church. 

Mrs. Lange died Jan. 10 
at home after a brief 
illness. 

She was a former 
dietary department worker 
at Quincy Hospital, where 
she worked for 25 years 
before retiring in 1982. 



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She was a member of 
St. John's Senior Citizens, 
the Fore River Club and 
the Quincy Drop-In Center. 

Born in Quincy, she 
was a lifelong resident and 
a graduate of Quincy High 
School. 

Wife of the late Victor 
Lange, she is survived by 
a son, Victor Lange of 
New Bedford; two 
daughters. Gloria 
Campbell of Norwell and 
Carolyn Ovcrby of Quincy; 
a brother, Flavio Durante 
of Quincy; nine 
grandchildren, and 10 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Bolea- 
Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 
116 Franklin St. 

Donatio!, s may be made 
to the H pice of the 
Quincy '< suing Nurse 
A'socia' ;n, 13 54 
V ncock ,S Quincy, MA 
( 69. 



Michael D. Benedict, 72 



Professional Engi 

A funeral Mass for 
Michael D. "Doug" 
Benedict, 72, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Jan. 16 in 
St. Ann's Church. 

Mr. Benedict died Jan. 
12 at home after a long 
illness. 

He was a registered 
professional engineer for 
the Gillette Co. of South 
Boston. An engineer for 33 
years, he previously 
worked for General 
Electric in Lynn and Ionics 
Inc. in Watertown. 

A boatsman, he was a 
member of the WoUaston 
Yacht Club, the Town 
River Yacht Club, the 
Coast Guard Auxiliary, the 
Commodores Club of 
America and the Power 
Squadroa 

A ham radio operator, 
he was a member of the 
South Shore Repeater 
Association, Radio Station 
WIQJI, the Quarter 
Century Wireless 
Association, the American 
Radio Relay League and 
the Capeway Radio Qub. 



ineer For 33 Years 

Bom in Newark, N.J., 
he lived 35 years in 
Quincy. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Arlene (Froberger) 
Benedict; three sons, 
Michael D. Benedict ni of 
California, Charles R. 
Benedict of Plymouth and 
Richard A. Benedict of 
Andoven three daughters, 
Joan E. Benedict of 
Minnesota, Arlene 
Nickerson of Connecticut 
and Ruth Bradley of 
California; two brothers, 
Richard Benedict of New 
York and Robert Benedict 
of California; eight 
grandchildren, and a great- 
grandchild. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Cancer 
Society, 247 

Commonwealth Ave., 
Boston, MA 021 16. 



Ellen C. Farrell, 26 

Self-Employed Dressmaker 



A funeral service for 
Ellen C. Farrell, 26, of 
Quincy, was held Jan. 14 
at Fort Square 
Presbyterian Church. 

Miss Farrell died Jan. 
10 at home after a long 
illness. 

She worked as a self- 
employed dressmaker for 
over a year. 

A 1984 graduate of 
Notre Dame Academy, she 
attended the University of 
Massachusetts in Boston 
for two years. 

She was bora in Boston. 

She is survived by her 



parents, Edward A. and 
Peggy J. (Decoulos) 
Farrell of Quincy; a sister, 
Anne E. Farrell of Quincy; 
and many uncles, aunts 
and cousins. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 



Thursday, January 21, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 11 

Isabel M. Hart, 84 

Former Rectory Housekeeper 



Joseph F. Walter, 91 

Retired Factory Supervisor 

funeral Mass for the St. George's Award 



A 

Joseph F. Walter, 91, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Tuesday in St. Ann's 
Church. 

Mr. Walter died Jan. 15 
after a long illness at John 
Scott Nursing Home in 
Braintree. 

A retired factory 
supervisor, he worked for 
Brown Manufacturing, a 
shoe company in Boston, 
for 51 years. He retired in 
1966. 

He was bom in East 
Boston. 

He was former president 
of the Holy Name Society 
at Sacred Heart Church in 
Roslindale. He was a 
member of the Fitton 
Council Knights of 
Columbus for 30 years, the 
Massachusetts Catholic 
Order of Forester and of 
Boy Scout Troop 7 in 
Roslindale. He received 



from Cardinal Gushing. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Cecilia F. 
(Gallagher) Walter of 
Quincy; a son, David 
Walter of Machias, Me.; 
two daughters, Dorothy 
Kirby of Quincy and 
Elizabeth O'Connor of 
Chicopee; 24 

grandchildren and 31 
great-grandchildren. He 
was the father of the late 
Joseph Walter. 

Burial was in St. 
Joseph's Cemetery, West 
Roxbury. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Boy Scouts of 
America, Greater Boston 
Council, 891 Centre St., 
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130. 



Donations may be made 
to Trinity Hospice, 545 
Boylston St., Boston, MA 
02115. 

Rose V. Tangney, 81 

Retired Secretary 

A funeral Mass for Rose daughters, Brenda 

Tangney-Zilla and Mary C. 
Tangney, all of Quincy; a 
brother, Phillip F. 
McCarthy of Weymouth; 
three sisters, Marguerite 
Trueman of Quincy, 
Winifred Gibson of Canton 
and Rorence Young of 
Pittfield; and three 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery, Canton. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 333 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Hospice of the 
South Shore, 100 Bay 
State Drive, P.O. Box 
9060, Braintree, MA 
02184. 

Caterina Carosi, 97 

A funeral Mass for Braintree and Carmella 

Hamilton of Quincy; 11 
grandchildren, and 1 1 
great-grandchildren. She 
was the mother of the late 
Beatrice Baldi. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Bolea- 
Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 
116 Franklin St. 



A funeral Mass for 
Isabel M. (Melong) Hart, 
84, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Jan. 16 in St. 
Joseph's Church. 

Mrs. Hart died Jan. 14 
at the Norwell Knoll 
Nursing Home in Norwell 
after a brief illness. 

She was a former 
housekeeper at St. 
Joseph's Rectory in 
Quincy Point for 20 years. 

She was a 

communicant of St. 
Joseph's Church. 



Bom in Nova Scotia, 
she lived in Quincy for 60 
years. 

Wife of the late Henry 
J. Hart, she is survived by 
a brother. Nelson Melong 
of Nova Scotia; a nephew, 
Richard N. Hart of 
Hingham; five 

grandnephews and a 
grandniece. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Elm St. 



V. (McCarthy) Tangney, 
81, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Jan. 16 in St. 
Agatha's Church, Milton. 

Mr. Tangney died Jan. 
13 at home after a brief 
illness. 

She retired this month 
after five years as a 
secretary for the Boston 
School Committee. She 
had also worked for 
General Dynamics. 

Born in Canton, she 
lived in Quincy for 25 
years. 

Wife of the late John I. 
Tangney, she is survived 
by two sons, Nicholas J. 
Tangney and Anthony J. 
Tangney, and two 



Mildred Clark, 81 

Retired Assembly Worker 

A funeral service for Nelson Clark, 
Mildred (Efford) Clark, 81, 
of Germantown, was held 
Tuesday in Christ Church. 

Mrs. Clark died Jan. 16 
at Quincy Hospital. 



She was a retired 
assembly worker for the 
former Couch Co. in 
Quincy. She retired 
1972. 

She was born 
Newfoundland, Canada. 

Wife of the late Gordon 



in 



in 



she is 
survived by two sisters, 
Jessie L. Boone of 
Newfoundland and 
Catherine Snow of 
Ontario; and several 
nieces and nephews. 

Burial was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the charity of one's 
choice. 



Helen F. Prescott, 89 

Retired School Food Preparer 



Caterina (DeNicola) 
Carosi, 97, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Jan. 16 in St. 
Joseph's Church. 

Mrs. Carosi died Jan. 14 
at the Quincy Nursing 
Home after a brief illness. 

Bom in Italy, she came 
to the United States and 
settled in Quincy when she 
was 17. 

Wife of the late Alfonso 
Carosi, she is survived by 
two sons, Paul S. Carosi of 
Quincy and Alfred C. 
Carosi of Braintree; two 
daughters, Mary Dawley of 



A funeral Mass for 
Helen F. (Farrell) 
Prescott, 89, of Wollaston, 
was celebrated Jan. 14 in 
St. Ann's Church. 

Mrs. Prescott died Jan. 
12 at home. 

She was a food preparer 
for many years in the 
cafeteria of St. Ann's 
School in Wollaston. 

Bom in Boston, she 
attended Boston schools. 

Wife of the late John R. 
Prescott, she is survived 
by a son, John R. Prescott 
Jr. of Quincy; five 
grandchildren, and 10 



great-grandchildren. She 
was the mother of the late 
Donald F. Prescott and 
sister of the late Mary E. 
Schaffer. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the South Shore Visiting 
hfurse Association, 100 
Bay State Drive, P.O. Box 

9060, Braintree, MA 
02184. 



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Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 21, 1993 



'What Can We Believe 
About Prayer?' Topic 
At United First Parish 



Dr. Sheldon W. 
Bennett, minister, will 
preach on "What Can We 
Believe About Prayer?" at 
the 10:30 a.m. worship 
service Sunday at United 
First Parish Church 
(Unitarian Universalist) in 
Quincy Center. 

The sermon will explore 
the role of solitude, 
meditation and prayer for 
personal spiritual growth 
from a liberal religious 
perspective and will 
consider the possibilities 
they hold for a better 
world. 



Visitors are welcome 
and are invited to the 
social hour following the 
service. 

The Women's Group 
and the Men's Group will 
meet at noon following the 
social hour. 

Historic First Parish, 
"Church of the 
Presidents," is located at 
1306 Hancock St., 
opposite City Hall. Church 
School and child care are 
provided (Brenda Chin, 
director). Call 773-1290 for 
information. 



9, 10:30 A.M. Services 
At HN Congregational 



The Rev. Alicia Corea 
will preach on "The 
Significance Of Law" at 
the 9 a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church, 
310 Manet Ave. 

Diaconate members 
serving will be Chris 
Carlson and John Conway. 
Greeter will be Ron 
Lemieux. 

At the 10:30 a.m. 
service. Dr. Peter V. Corea 
will preach on "The Times 
To Say Yes." The choir 
will sing under the 
direction of Arden T. 
Schofield. Joyce Bishop 
will be the greeter, and 
Norman Straughn and 
Barbara Curran will serve 
for the Diaconate. 

The coffee hour 
between the services will 
be hosted by Miriam 
Coombs. 

The Early Childhood 
Sunday School session for 
children ages 2 1/2 through 
Grade I will meet from 



8:30 to 10 a.m. The 
intermediate group will 
meet from 10 to 11:30 a.m. 
Pilgrim Fellowship, for all 
who are in Grades 7-12, 
will meet at 7 p.m. in 
fellowship hall with Ada 
and Ralph Freeman. 

Mothers and Others 
Club will meet 
Wednesday, Jan. 27 with 
President Susan 

Catrambone. The 

Executive Board will meet 
at 7 p.m. with the regular 
meeting at 7:30 p.m. The 
program "New 

Beginnings" will begin at 
8 p.m. Refreshments will 
be served by Ruth Gordon, 
Alicia Corea, and Lois 
Bassett. All women of the 

community are welcome 

to attend. 

The church is equipped 
for the physically 
challenged. Donations are 
sought for the baskets in 
the vestibule for Fr. Bill's 
Place and the PSSB 
Pantry Shelf. 



Religion 



'Golden Calf Topic 
At Bethany Congregational 



New ENC President, Wife 
To Host Reception Jan. 23 



Rev. Roger Ketcham 
will preach a sermon on 
the topic "Golden Calf and 
Covered Glory" Sunday at 
the 10 a.m. worship service 
at Bethany Congregational 
Church, Quincy Center. 

The scripture reader 
will be Vivian Miller. The 
chancel choir will sing two 
selections accompanied by 
organist Gregory Flynn 
who will also play a 
prelude and postlude. 

The worshipers will be 
welcomed as they enter 



the sanctuary by Herman 
and Dorothy Mersereau. 
Following the service, a 
Fellowship Hour will be 
hosted in Allen Parlor by 
Bill and Jean Ann 
Phinney. 

Church School classes 
begin at 10 a.m. The Bible 
Study Group meets at 8:30 
a.m. 

Bethany Church is 
handicapped accessible. 
Child care is provided for 
infants and toddlers during 
the worship service. 



The First Miracles 
Sermon Topic At Covenant 



Rev. Gordon Schultz, 
interim pastor, will preach 
at the 10:45 a.m. worship 
service Sunday at 
Covenant Congregational 
Church, 315 Whitwell St. 

His message will be 
based on the Gospel of 
John, the descriptions of 
Christ's first miracle. 

Richard Smith, minister 
of music, will direct and 
accompany the choir. He 
will also play an organ 
prelude, postlude and 
offertory. 

Sunday School, with 
classes for all ages, 
nursery through adult, will 
begin at 9:30 a.m. During 
the service a nursery is 
available for ages five and 
younger. For children up to 
age 12, there is junior 



church. 

Following the service 
there will be a sandwich 
luncheon. Members are 
asked to bring sandwiches 
to share. Following lunch, 
the congregation will hold 
its annual meeting. The 
budget and ballot will be 
presented for approval. 

Activities for the week 
are: 

Choir rehearsal 
Thursday at 7 p.m. 

The Ladies Aid meeting 
has been cancelled. 

Sunday, Jan. 31, will by 
Pastor Schultz's final 
Sunday. Installation of the 
new Pastor, Rev. LuAnn 
Johnson, will be Sunday, 
Feb. 14. 

For information call 
479-5728. 



'A Front Line Church' 
United Methodist Sermon Topic 




^ 



\ Rectory 



Church of 
Saint John 
the Baptist 

44 School St., Quincy, MA 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Saturday 4:00 & 7:00 pm 

Sunday: 7 am, 

9 am, 11 am, 

12:30 and 5:30 pm 

Confessions in Chapel Sat. 3-3:45 pm 

21 Gay St. 773-1021 



"A Front Line Church" 
will be the sermon topic of 
the Rev. Harry Soper, Jr., 
Sunday at the 10 a.m. 
worship service at Quincy 
Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St. 

Kathleen Afton will be 
the scripture reader. 
Linada Conant and Adele 
Hamilton will greet 
worhshipers. Ushers will be 
Russell and Mildred 



Peterson. 

Sunday School will 
follow the Young 
Disciple's message. 

The Fellowship Hour in 
Susannah Wesley Hall 
will be hosted by Sybil 
Whyte, Margaret 

McMullen, Patricia Potter 
and Gloria Tinell. 

Church facilities are 
wheelchair accessible and 
nursery care is provided. 



Survivors of 
Sexual Abuse 

A thereby group for women 

who were sexually abused 

For Information Call: 

Mona Barbera, Ph.D. 

547.2268 



Take 
stock 

'"America 



Dr. Kent R. Hill, llth 
president of Eastern 
Nazarene College, and his 
wife, Janice, will host an 
introductory reception of 
Boston area alumni and 
friends Saturday, Jan. 23 at 
5 p.m. in the Great Room 
of the Quincy Marketplace 
at Fanueil Hall, Boston. 

Friends and neighbors 
of the college are invited. 
Call the Office of 
Institutional Advancement 
at 773-6350 to confirm a 
reservation. 

Dr. Hill was elected to 



ENC's top post in October, 
after serving for six years 
as president of the Institute 
for Democracy and 
Religion (IDR) in 
Washington, D.C. Hill, his 
wife and their two 
children, Jennifer and 
Jonathan, will be moving 
to Quincy in February to 
assume the full-time duties 
of the office. 

Hill is an 

internationally-recognized 
scholar on religion in 
Russia and on Christian 
apologetics. 



Super Bowl Sunday Take-Out 
At HN Congregational 



Houghs Ne ck 

Congregational Church 
will celebrate its 100th 
anniversary in 1994. 

To prepare for this 
milestone, the Centennial 
Committee, co-chaired by 
Dorothy Sparks and Gayle 
Mackay, is preparing a 
series of fundraisers this 
year. 

The first of these events 
is a Super Bowl Sunday 
Take-Out Jan. 31. The 
committee will sell chili 
and corn chowder to go 
from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 



p.m. Homemade rolls and 
corn bread may also be 
purchased. 

Prices for the chowder 
or chili are $2 a pint, $3.50 
a quart, and two quarts for 
$6. The rolls and combread 
will sell for $1.25 per 8- 
inch pan. Orders may be 
placed now by calling Dot 
at 479-6259, Alpha at 472- 
2463, Susan at 479-5776, 
or Gayle at 773-6522. 

All orders are to be 
picked up at the church, 
310 Manet Ave., Jan. 31 
between 11:30 a.m. and 
2:30 p.m. 



Red Cross Courses 
Offered In February 



The South Area Office 
of the American Red 
Cross, 85 Quincy Ave., is 
offering a variety of 
courses during February: 

Standard First Aid: 
Tuesday, Feb. 2 and 9, 
from 6 to 10 p.m.; 
Saturday, Feb. 13, from 9 
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

BLS ■ CPR, R: 
Saturday, Feb. 6, from 9 
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

Adult CPR: 

Wednesday, Feb. 10, from 



6 to 10 p.m. 

Comm. CPR: 

Thursday, Feb. 11 and 18, 
from 6 to 10 p.m.; 
Saturday, Feb. 27, from 9 
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

Inf. & Child CPR: 
Tuesday, Feb. 16 and 23, 
from 6 to 10 p.m. 

Mass. Child Care: 
Saturday, Feb. 20, from 9 
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

First Aid - P: Thursday, 
Feb. 25, from 6:30 to 10:30 
pjn. 




QCA Annual Meeting 
At Atlantic Center Jan. 27 

Quincy Citizens Wednesday, Jan. 27 at 8 
Association will hold its P'"- ^' the Atlantic 
annual meeting Neighborhood Center, 

—" — ^-i^— ^— ^ Hunt St., North Quincy. 

The meeting had been 
postponed from Dec. 5. 

Election of officers will 
be held and plans for 1993 
will be discussed. 



aWNDS 




ST. ANN SCHOOL 

WOLLASTON 

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education at very affordable rates. 




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Holidays, Vacation 
Week & Non-School days. 



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$450 



TIIITiny S775 In Parish, $925 out of Parish, 
lUIIIUIl Book Fee $100 



• IndlvldualizMi Instruction through 
reduced class siza 

• Science lab experience for students 
In grade K-8 

• Free private tutoring weelily 

• Total Educational experience in 
a safe and orderty environment 



• Spanish In grades 6-8 

• Computer, Art, Music A Physical Education 
in grades K-S 

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Choir, Drama Club, Photography Club 



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Thursday, January 21, 1993 Qnlncy Sun Page 13 



Sun Sports 



Basketball 



Sheets Leads 
North Over 

Quincy, 57-49 



The Quincy and North 
Quincy boys' basketball 
teams have had 
disappointing seasons, but 
North's Luke Sheets saw to 
it that the Raiders, 
following three 

heartbreaking losses, 
returned to the win column 
last Friday night, defeating 
Quincy, 57-49. 

North improved its 
record to 5-6, while 
Quincy fell to 3-7. 

North Quincy played at 
Plymouth Tuesday, will 
host Falmouth Friday night 
at 7 o'clock and will be at 
Barnstable next Tuesday 
night at 7. 

Quincy played Taunton 
Tuesday, will be at 
Weymouth Friday at 7 and 
will be home to 
Bridgewater-Raynham 
next Tuesday at 7. 

North Quincy had lost 
to Taunton by three points, 
Weymouth by one and 
Bridgewater-Raynham in 
triple overtime in its three 
games preceding the 
Quincy game. 

Sheets had his best 
night of the season as he 
scored 25 points, leading 
an inside assault that 
burned the smaller 
Presidents throughout the 
game. 

"We just decided to 
pound the ball inside and 
try to get their center 
(John Russell) in foul 
trouble," said North coach 
Ted Stevenson. 

"We gave up a few too 
many threes tonight, but 7 
was happy with the way 
we played. We really 
needed this one after three 
tough defeats. We haven't 
made the big plays lately 
and tonight we did." 

Quincy, whose offense 
is built around the outside 
shooting of Matt Dwyer 
(12 points), Robbie Kane 
(eight points) and Joe 
Kelly (15 points), failed to 
get any inside game going. 

North Quincy center 
Jason McLeod, a 6' 8" 
transfer from Oregon, 
scored 11 points, grabbed 
12 rebounds and had eight 
blocked shots. 

He also did some fine 



passing as he was often 
stationed at the foul line to 
draw Quiocy's defense 
away from the hoop and as 
a result, he often found 
Sheets and Bo Smith 
(eight points) in 
mismatches underneath for 
easy baskets. Sean 
Donovan, one of North's 
high scorers, had nine 
points. 

"When you play against 
a team like that, your 
defensive rotation has to 
be sound," said Quincy 
coach John Franceschini. 
"Our rotation broke down 
in the second half. You 
have to play man-to-man 
defense because they are a 
fine passing team and if 
you double someone they 
will find the open man." 

Quincy held its own in 
the first half as Dwyer hit 
two three-pointers to give 
his team a 16-13 lead. But 
the Raiders came back 
with a 8-4 run behind 
Sheets' two turnarounds to 
take a 21-20 halftime lead. 

A 6-0 run to start the 
second half put North 
ahead to stay, although 
Quincy cut the lead to 31- 
29, but North scored the 
next eight points to clinch 
the win. 

Earlier in the week 
Bridgewater-Raynham hit 
six straight free throws in 
the third overtime session 
to defeat North Quincy, 
59-53. 

Sheets sent the game 
into overtime with a 
basket with seven seconds 
left in regulation. 

B-R's Matt Hammond 
hit a three-pointer with 11 
seconds left in the first 
overtime, sending the 
game into a second 
overtime tied at 45. 

McLeod had his best 
game of the season for 
North, scoring 28 points 
and taking down 15 
rebounds. 

Quincy lost to Silver 
Lake, 89-77, despite 20 
points by Kane and 15 by 
Dwyer. 

Eric Anthrop paced the 
Lakers with 22 points, 
while Scott Madden 
chipped in with 16. 

"TOM SULLIVAN 



ENC, Curry Live 
On Cable TV 



The Eastern Nazarene 
College vs. Curry College 
basketball game will be 
televised live, Monday, 
Jan. 25 at 8 p.m. on cable 
Ch.3. 

Both teams compete in 



the NCAA Division 3 
Commonwealth Coast 
Conference. A replay of 
the game will be aired 
Tuesday, Jan. 26 at 9 a.m., 
and Wednesday, Jan. 27 at 
1 p.m. 





NORTH QUINCY'S Sean Warren goes for two points 
against Taunton as teammate Luke Sheets moves in 
during recent OCL action. The Raiders lost, 78-75. 



RED RAIDERS' Luke Sheets lays in two of his 16 points 
in a recent heartbreaking loss to Taunton, 78-75. Sheets 
also had 10 rebounds for North. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 



North Girls Win, 57-30 



The North Quincy girls' 
basketball team has had 
an up and down season, 
but the team evened its 
record to 5-5 with its 
second win over rival 
Quincy, 57-30, last Friday 
night. 

The North girls had 



previously defeated 
Quincy in the consolation 
round of the North Quincy 
Christmas Tournament. 
The teams will meet again 
Feb. 1 1 at Quincy. 

North Quincy faced 
Plymouth Tuesday, will be 
at Falmouth Friday and 



will be home to Barnstable 
next Tuesday at 7 p.m. 

Winless Quincy played 
at Taunton Tuesday, will 
be host to Weymouth 
Friday at 7 and will be at 
Bridgewater-Raynham 
next Tuesday. 

Senior Regina Murphy 



had 12 points, eight blocks 
and six steals to spark 
North over Quincy. The 
team also got 10 points 
fit)m senior Julie Ramos. 

Peg Connolly had seven 
points for Quincy, which 
trailed, 32-20, at the half 
and fell farther behind 
during the second half. 



Wrestling 



Quincy, North Have Shot At Top 



The Quincy and North 
Quincy wrestling teams 
continue to do well in the 
Old Colony League and 
wins last night 
(Wednesday) would pit 
the Presidents and Red 
Raiders against each other 
next Wednesday night at 7 
o'clock in a battle for first 
place. 

The meet will be at 
Quincy's Center for 
Technical Education gym. 

Quincy faced 

Bridgewater-Raynham and 
North met Weymouth last 
night. Saturday Quincy 
will face Norwood and 
Xaverian at Canton at 11 
a.m. and North will wrestle 
at Boston College High at 
10 a.m. 

Quincy, which lost its 
first three meets of the 
year, continued on the 
comeback trail last 
Saturday with a 48-24 win 
over Hingham to even its 
overaU record to 5-5. 

North Quincy also 
topped Hingham, 46-26, to 
improve its overall record 
to 6-2. 

For the Presidents, 
freshman Rich Testa (103) 
recorded his first varsity 
win with a pin. 

Junior Jon Bonsignore 
(119) also won his first 



varsity match while Shane 
O'Connor (112), 

sophomore Bryan Gallahue 
(152), sophomore Gregg 
Santoro (140), sophomore 
Jason Bennett (160) and 
senior Ben Radcliffe all 
won their matches. 



The surprise of the 
season has been the 
performance of sophomore 
heavyweight Mike Feeley, 
who improved to 7-0 in 
dual meets with his pin 
against Hingham. 

For North Quincy James 



O'Connell, Billy Chiu, 
Jamie Karvelis, Frannie 
Bellotti, Paul Delaney, 
Jeff Pillard, Chris Hamel, 
Rick MacVarish and Andy 
Schwendenman all pinned 
their rivals against 
Hingham. 



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Page 14 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 21, 1993 



Six From Quincy 
Advance In Hoop Shoot 



Sacred Heart Basketball 



Three boys and three 
girls age 8-13 have won 
the Quincy Championship 
in the Elks National Hoop 
Shoot Free Throw Contest. 

The event is 
cosponsored locally by the 
Quincy Recreation 
Department and the 
Quincy Lodge of Elks. 

The six winners 
advance to the Circle 
District Championship to 
shoot against winners from 
nine other competitions in 
Southeastern 
Massachusetts. 

First place trophies 
were awarded to Lauren 
£>oyle and Joseph Sudak in 
the 8/9 age category. 
Colleen Kelly and Brian 
Deshler won trophies in 
the 10/11 age group. Mike 
Travers and Barbara Ryan 
became champions in the 
12/13 age category. 

Over 250 youngsters 
shot in the Quincy 
competition which was 
conducted at nine 
locations supervised by 
leaders from the Quincy 
Recreation Department. 
The center winners were 



all eligible to compete in 
the finals, as were family 
members of the Quincy 
Lodge 943. The Elks Hoop 
Shoot is in its 21st year 
and over 3 million boys 
and girls are expected to 
participate nationally this 
year. In the competition a 
point is awarded for each 
successful free throw; the 
best of 25 shots is the 
winner. 

The second and third 
place finishers also 
received trophies from Ed 
Miller, Hoop Shot 
chairman for the Quincy 
Lodge. Barry J. Welch, 
Director of Recreation, 
presented certificates to 
all center champions. All 
participants also received 
a gift certificate courtesy 
of the Wollaston Papa 
Gino's and water bottles 
from CVS. 

Those receiving second 
place trophies were boys 
8/9, Patrick Jaehnig; boys 
10/11, Mark Dunn; girls 
10/11, Caitlen Nichols; 
boys 12/13, Chris Bregoh. 

Those receiving third 
place trophies were 



Patrick Bregoli in the 8/9 
age category, Daimy Kelly 
in the 10/11, Ann Shields 
in the girls 10/1 1 aiMl Chris 
Leonard in the boys 12/13. 

The center champions 
are: 

Boys 8/9: Chris 
Smeglin, Charlie Vidoli, 
Andrew Ross, Chris Gray, 
William Eisan, Glenn 
Picot, George Camia and 
Mark Robertson. 

Girls 8/9: Kelly 
Connelly, Nadine Kellam, 
Sherri McCuster, Diana 
Ainsley and Allison 
Pickering. 

Boys 10/11: Stephen 
Malone, Andrew Currie, 
Ryan Hutchings, Chris 
Igoe, Shawn Boostroom, 
Jeff Burke, Andrew 
Mannix, Tim Nelson, John 
Hurley and Sean Cote. 

Girls 10/11: Christina 
Milone, Maggie Ketchum, 
Shauna Burns and 
Katherine Noble. 

Boys 12/13: Jeremy 
Theberge, Mike Doren, 
Kevin Sullivan and Mike 
McEvoy. 

Girls 12/13: Colleen 
MacDougall. 



Hat Tricks Power Squirt Cs, 9-3 



Quincy's Squirt C 
hockey team defeated 
Westwood, 9-3, with Nick 
Pizziferri and Sean 
Lefebvre having hat tricks. 

Andy Nestor had two 
goals and Stephen King 
one. Chris Lumaghini, 
Tom Gouthro and Nestor 
had two assists apiece and 
Tom Maloney and 



Pizziferri one each. 
Stephanie Allen played 
strong defense. 

Quincy tied Waltham, 
3-3, with Mike Sullivan, 
Lefebvre and Mike Carloni 
scoring the goals and Tom 
Gaeta, Pizziferri, Sullivan 
and Lefebvre having 
assists. Chris Murphy 
played strong defense. 



Quincy also tied 
Brookline, 4-4, with 
Pizziferri, Lefebvre, 
Maloney and Sean 
McCusker scoring the 
goals. Jeff Brophy, Carloni 
and Lefebvre had assists. 
Pat O'Donnell continued to 
play outstanding goal and 
Shane Kabilian excelled 
on defense. 



Mite As Win Two 



Quincy's Mite A hockey 
team, sponsored by 
Northland Seafood, 
defeated South Boston, 5- 
3, and also topped Canton, 

In handing South 
Boston its first loss since 
December of 1990, Quincy 
was led by Scott 



MacDonald's two goals. 
Matt Holt, Steve 
McGonagle and Charlie 
Sorrento had a goal each. 
Steven Goff, Shawn 
Dooley and Mark Gibbons 
had assists. Matt Gregory 
was outstanding in goal. 

In the Canton game, 
MacDonald had a hat trick 




and Goff, Holt, Sorrento 
and Jimmy Cashins one 
each. Dooley had three 
assists and David 
Germain, Brian Stock, 
Sorrento, Gibbons and 
MacDonald one apiece. 

Pam Sullivan, Jill 
Mclnnis, Ryan Barry, Paul 
Flynn and Shawn 
Richardson continued their 
fine play in both games. 



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By JOE HERN 

"Never say die" was 
the lesson of the most 
recent Sacred Heart North 
Quincy Basketball League 
games. Two teams staged 
disciplined comebacks to 
claim close wins with 
seconds to spare. In all, 
three games were decided 
by one basket. 

Rookie girls (8-10): The 
Celtics bested the 
Lightning Bolts, 14-10, 
with Jackie "Chief" 
Suprey hitting the rainbow 
shots for the Celtics while 
Rose "Bud" Zerrigan 
insured the win with 
excellent defense. MeUssa 
Spezzano played well for 
the Bolts, Nora Hanna 
produced clutch baskets 
and Jillian Manning was 
unrelenting on defense. 

The Hip Hoopsters 
hopped over the Dazzling 
Dribblers, 9-8, in a game 
decided at the wire. 
Melissa Doyle and Lauren 
Doyle combined for the 
Hoopsters' baskets while 
Kelley Doherty sparked 
the defense. Anne Marie 
Moynihan pulled down 
several rebounds, Julie 
Cummings made good 
passes and Tanya Higgins 
played strong defense for 
the Dribblers. 
The Dalmations 
defeated the Mighty 
Midgets, 14-8, with 
Caroline Francis leading 
the defense and Danielle 
Doherty playing solidly for 
the Dalmations. For the 
Midgets Casey Ridge 
played good defense and 
did some excellent ball 
handling, Casey Dooley 
rebounded and scored well 
and Monita Chiu 
rebounded well and played 
tight defense. 

Rookie boys (8-10): 
The Duke Blue Devils 
handed the Hawks their 
first loss, 24-16. Led by 
Pat Jaehnig and Ryan 
Graber, the Blue Devils 
broke a 14-14 tie after 
three quarters and wore 
down the undennanned 
Hawks with a 10-2 run. 
Phil "Sprint" 

McGillicuddy, the Hawks' 
designated long-distance 
carrier, provided 12 points 
for the Hawks, most on 
long jump shots. Timmy 
Nelson played a strong 
floor game and "Rookie of 
the Year" Tommy Cabral 
played super in the first 
game of what promises to 
be a stellar career. 

The 76ers toppled the 
Bulls, 23-16, on the 
combination of Tom 
Buckley, tough 



underneath, who scored 
the key baskets, Jeff 
Narbone, with his big 
rebounds and good hustle 
and Jack Liuzzo, who led 
the offense without 
neglecting the defense. Pat 
Alessi, Derek Keezer and 
Joslin Alder played well 
for the Bulls. 

The Magic knocked the 
wind out of the Hurricanes, 
20-17, with Raymond Chu 
making the key passes, 
Mike Paul playing smart 
defense and Adam O'Hara 
pulling down the rebounds 
in a tough defensive game 
going down to the wire. 
Chris Ham set the pace for 
the Hurricanes, Greg 
Shields moved the ball 
well and Joey Hem dove 
fearlessly after the loose 
balls. 

The Trail Blazers 
topped the Celtics, 24-18, 
led by the triumvirate of 
Chris and Terrence "no 
relation" Doherty and Eric 
Ridlon. Gabriel Ho played 
fine defense for the 
Blazers, Mark Maher 
launched some fine shots 
and Bela Kobialla did 
some outstanding 
rebounding. 

College girls (11-12): 
Providence claimed its 
first win by beating Notre 
Dame, 20-15. Led by the 
scoring of Kim Lavery, the 
defense of Kate Lavery 
and the solid play of 
Leona Ma, the Friars 
jumped out to an 8-0 lead. 
The Irish clawed back to 
within three points in the 
fourth quarter but 
Providence wouldn't be 
denied and held on, icing 
it with a buzzer beater. 
Dorothy Cronin made key 
baskets for the Irish, 
Suzanne Milburn was 
wherever the ball was and 
Jeannie Sheahan played 
her usual strong defensive 
game. 

Georgetown defeated 
B.C. in a game that saw 
Melissa Pulera playing a 
strong all-around game and 
Meghan Newton and Laura 
Murphy also playing well. 
Liz McNally, Barry Koch 
and Stephanie Collins 
played solid games for the 
Eagles. 

College boys (10-11): 
The Hurricanes dropped a 
20-18 decision to the 
Fighting Irish in a game 
decided with three seconds 
left in overtime. Eric 
Stoekel made pin-point 
passes for the Irish, Dan 
"Havlicek" Louie stole the 
ball and Don Kavanaugh 
made good shots. 

In another squeaker the 



Matt McLarnon On 
Salve Regina Grid Team 



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Matt McLarnon of 
Quincy was a member of 
Salve Regina (Newport, 
R.I.) University's first-ever 
football team this past fall. 

McLarnon, a freshman, 
was a starting offensive 



^ 



American Heart 
Association 



guard for Salve Regina 
which finished with a 4-2 
record. 

He is a 1992 graduate 
of Archbishop Wilhams 
High School where he was 
a football all-scholastic. 
He is the son of James and 
Linda McLarnon of 
Quincy. 

Salve Regina competes 
in the NCAA's Division m 
in 16 sports programs. 



Blue Devils came from 
behind to edge the 
Tarheels, 24-22. Mark 
Repoff made key baskets 
for the Devils aided by the 
rebounding of Nils 
Erickson and the defense 
of Bill Tarn. Chris Liccardi 
was a hot shooter for the 
Tarheels, Brenda Donovan 
was solid on defense and 
Rick Loughmiller 
rebounded aggressively. 

The Running Rebels, 
with another inspiring 
comeback, outran the 
Panthers, 38-35. Adam 
Goodrich tickled the twine 
for 10 points, Brian 
Deshler had eight and 
Eddie Blesdel four for the 
Rebels. Fred Butts had a 
big game with 10 points 
for the Panthers, Pat Foley 
had seven and played 
strong defense and Jim 
Sullivan scored six points. 
The Eagles romped over 
the Wolverines, 37-14. 
Matt O'Day and Nick Cyr 
set the tone for the Eagles' 
dominating offensive play 
and the defense was 
tenacious, paced by 
Jonathan Lester. For the 
Wolverines Dan O 'Toole 
had eight points, Pat 
Dolbear had six and Steve 
Minukas was the floor 
leader. 

Pro girls (13-14): The 
Skeahan Squad defeated 
Army, 31-26, in a game 
featuring great offensive 
and defensive plays. Army 
was paced by Kerry 
O'Donnell 's 10 points, Erin 
McVeigh had six and did 
some nice rebounding and 
Anne Glavin had four 
points and played strong 
defense. 

Pro boys (12-14): The 
Oilers topped the Celtics, 
42-35, in a battle of the 
undefeated. The Oilers 
were keyed by three 
Dennis Ready hoops and a 
big basket by Ryan 
Deshler. Tom Bowes kept 
the Celts close with 14 
points and Robbie Bowes' 
aggressive defense held 
the explosive Sean 
O 'Toole in check. Adam 
Radzevich had seven 
points for the Celts. 

The Kings squeaked by 
the Warriors, 28-27, to 
claim their first victory in 
a thrilling last-second 
triumph. Bill Nelson, Pat 
Cummings and Jason 
Gibson played well for the 
Kings. Bill Manning 
controlled the Warrior 
offense, Dan LeBlanc was 
tough on the boards and 
Jon Green played zealous 
defense. 

Mite Cs Win 

Quincy's Mite C hockey 
team defeated Brookline, 
4-1, with Ketuiy Rechell 
scoring the game winner, 
his first goal of the year. 

Jordan Virtue had two 
goals and Joey Fitzpatrick 
one. Matt Moriarity, 
Andrew Rose and Matt 
Conso had assists. 

Matt and Sean 
Moriarity played strong 
defense and Peter 
Turowski was outstanding 
in his first game in goal. 



Hockey 



Thursday, January 21, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 15 



North Loses 

To Weymouth, 

Ties BR 



Quincy Win Streak Snapped 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The North Quincy 
hockey team, after having 
a five-game win streak 
ended with a hard-to-take 
loss to undefeated 
Weymouth, escaped a 
second straight loss 
Saturday when Dave 
Pacino's goal with a 
minute left gave the 
Raiders a 4-4 tie with 
Bridgewater-Raynham. 

North is now 6-2-1 (3-2- 
1 in the Old Colony 
League). 

North faced Quincy (6- 
3-2) last night in what 
shaped up as one of the 
year's top games, will host 
Falmouth Saturday at 7:50 
at the Quincy Youth Arena 
and will be home to 
Barnstable next 

Wednesday at 7:50. 

North got off to a great 
start against B-R, taking 
an early 3-0 lead but that 
was all the Raiders could 
do until the late tying goal. 

"I was very 

disappointed in the way 
we played," said North 
coach Tom Benson. "We 
started out strong but just 
stopped playing after that. 
It was just very 
disappointing after a tough 
loss to Weymouth." 

The Raiders have been 
playing without Joe 
Carinici, who separated 
his shoulder, and he is 
expected to be out of 
action for another two 
weeks. He had been 
playing excellent hockey 
and has been missed. 

Mike DesRoche, tied 
for the league lead with 25 
points, scored North's first 
goal unassisted and scored 
the second with Brendan 
O'Brien and Jim Sapienza 
assisting. Sapienza scored 
the third goal with O'Brien 
assisting. 

O'Brien and DesRoche 
assisted on Pacino's game- 
tying goal. 

Weymouth goalie Scott 
Young was the difference 



The Quincy hockey 
team had a six-game 
unbeaten streak snapped 
last Saturday when it lost 
to Silver Lake, 5-3, 
dropping its record to 6-3-2 
(3-2-1 in the Old Colony 
League). 

The Presidents faced 
North Quincy (6-2-1) last 
night (Wednesday) in 
what shaped up as one of 
the big games of the year, 
will face unbeaten 
Weymouth Saturday at 
7:40 at the Pilgrim Arena 
in Hingham and will be at 
Bridgewater-Raynham 
next Wednesday night at 8 
p.m. 



in the win over North 
Quincy earlier in the week. 

Young had 34 saves, 
many of the spectacular 
variety including some 
point-blank shots. 

North Quincy outplayed 
us in all facets of the 
game, except 

goaltending," said 
Weymouth coach Tim 
Murphy. "Goaltending was 
the key to victory and 
Scott Young saved us. He 
bad an outstanding game." 

"We need to cash in on 
some point-blank shots, 
but missed chances were 
the difference," said 
Benson. "We should have ^he North Quincy boys' Licciardi and Jimmy Chen 
been up two or three goals ^^^^. j^^^ pi^g^^j ^y and all wiU miss some or 



Quincy jumped off to a 
2-0 lead against Silver 
Lake on goals by David 
Cooper (assisted by Jamie 
Schatzl) and Mark 
Gilmore (assists for Sean 
McArdle and Steve 
Miller). 

The Presidents scored 
in the second period on a 
goal by Steve Provost 
(assists for Miller and 
McArdle), but the Lakers 
scored twice and Quincy 
held a 3-2 edge going into 
the third period. 

While the Presidents 
were being blanked, Paul 
Toler tied the game and 
Dan McLeod scored 



midway through the period 
to put the Lakers ahead. 
Sophomore Kevin Perry 
scored an empty net goal 
when Quincy coach Bob 
Sylvia pulled the goalie. 

The Lakers' Brian Cole, 
one of the best goalies in 
the league, stopped 33 
Quincy shots, 13 in the 
final period. Quincy 
sophomore goalie Mark 
Smith made 23 saves. 

"We certainly had our 
chances, especially in the 
third period, but we just 
couldn't beat Cole," said 
Sylvia. 

Silver Lake keyed on 
Quincy's top scorer, Jeff 



Craig (25 points) and for 
one of the few times this 
year he was held without a 
point. 

Earlier in the week 
Quincy edged Barnstable, 
2-1, on Dan Morrell's goal 
with 1 1 minutes to play. 

Cooper had scored the 
other Quincy goal early in 
the game. Craig assisted 
on both goals. 

Smith had another fine 
game in goal, stopping 24 
of 25 Barnstable shots. The 
Barnstable goalie was also 
outstanding, making 
several excellent saves. 

"TOM SULLIVAN 



Track 



North Boys Lose To B-R 



going into the third period. 



injuries and illness, has 



On the plus side, we are ^^^ ^ 2-3 record, losing 
finally realizing we can ^^ ^ ^ Bridgewater- 

play with the Weymouths ^^^^ team, 56-35, 
and Plymouths. 
North's many 



m 



missed 
included 
open net 



its latest meet. 



opportunities 
missing three 
shots. 

Young made big saves 
on Kevin Boylen, A.J. 
Carthas and O'Brien early 
in the game before the 
Wildcats took a 1-0 lead. 
They made it 2-0 at 4:10 
of the middle period. They 
increased their lead to 3-0 
at 9:19. 

North came back and 
Sapienza scored a power- 
play goal at 10:51 of the 
period after a great rush 
from his own zone and 
Boylen made it 3-2 with 
Carthas assisting. 

North nearly tied it but 
Young made a great pad 
save on Andrew 
Vermette's shot and 

Weymouth made it 4-2 on 
Larry Anzalone's second 
goal. 

The Raiders made it 4-3 
when DesRoche knocked 
in his own rebound but 
Young made two more big 
saves stopping O'Brien and 
DesRoche with 1:20 left, 
clinching the win for 
Weymouth. 



North has been 
operating without Sean 
Nee, Mark Sinclair, Tony 



all of the remaining indoor 
meets. 

In the B-R meet. Josh 
Walty won the 1,000, 
Jeremy Gott won the 600 
and high jump, Justin 
Dilks won the shotput, and 
the 4x400 relay team of 
Andy Kenney, Glenn 



North Girls 
Defeat B-R 



Executive Hockey 



Grumpy*s Blanks Fowler 



Grumpy White's Pub 
blanked Fowler House, 5- 
0, behind the shutout 
goaltending of George 
Brownell in Quincy 
Executive League action. 

Mark Boultier paced 
the offense with two goals 
and Paul Veneziano, Mark 
Flaherty and Dave Perdios 
also netted goals. Perdios 
and Dick McCabe each 
had two assists and John 
Andrews also had an 
assist. 

Scott Richardson tallied 
four goals and an assist to 
spark South Shore Bearing 
to an 8-4 win over Beacon 
Sports. Steve Dyment 
added two goals and Jack 
Aldred and Bob Carroll 
netted one each. 

Tom Cahill had four 
assists for South Shore, 



Jay Powers had three, and 
Aldred, Dyment and 
Carroll had two each. 

Mike Boyle, Art Boyle, 
Skip Manganaro and 
Kevin Jago each scored for 
Beacon and Art Boyle and 
Peter DiBona had assists. 

Adams Sports defeated 
Flibotte's Auto Sales, 7-1, 
as Jack Fowkes scored two 
goals and assisted on 
another. Also scoring were 
Bob Fowkes, Paul 
O'Brien, Kevin Harnett, 
Bibby Lewis and Mark 
Giordani. 

John McCarthy had 
three assists, Bob Fowkes 
two, and Dan Fowkes, 
Lewis and Giordani one 
each. 

John Norton scored for 
Flibotte's assisted by Doug 
McLean. 



The North Quincy girls' 
track team improved to 3-1 
with a 55-36 victory over 
Bridgewater-Raynham. 

North's winners were 
Katy Deady in the 50, 
Suzanne Lewis in the 
mile, Laura Blaikie in the 
two mile, Stacie Minukas 
in the shotput and the 
4x100 relay team of 
Phyllis Poon, Erin Skahan, 
Amalia Solano and Jen 
Pineo. 

Placing second were 
Chrissy Herman in the 
hurdles, Mel Gaziano in 
the 1,000, Suzanne 
Hamilton in the high jump 
and 300, Minukas in the 
50, Erin Duggan in the 
mile. Erica Doherty in the 
two-mile and Jennifer 
Walker in the shotput. 

Taking third places 
were Katie McNamara in 
the 1,000, Jen Nutley in 
the 300, Alyssa Cobban in 
the high jump and I*ineo in 
the shot put. 

North dropped a 49-42 
decision to Silver Lake. 

Nutley won the 300, 
Jessie Ceurvels the 600, 
Lewis the mile, Gaziano 
the 1,000 and the relay 
team of Nutley, Deady, 
liana Cobban and 



Hamilton also won. 

Taking second places 
were Deady in the 50, 
Doherty in the mile and 
Duggan in the two-mile. 

Placing third were 
Hamilton in the 300, Dana 
Cobban in the 600, Karen 
Leary in the 1,000, 
Kabilian in the mile, 
Blaikie in the two-mile, 
Alyssa Cobban in the 
hurdles, Linda Jellison and 
Alyssa Cobban, tied in the 
high jump, and Minukas in 
the shotput. 

In the Dartmouth 
Relays Lewis placed ninth 
in the seeded two-mile 
(11:39.8), Duggan was 
seventh in the unseeded 
two-mile (12:39.2) and 
Blaikie ninth in the 
unseeded two-mile 
(12:41.4). 

"Injuries and illness 
have plagued both our 
girls' and boys' squads and 
have prevented the teams 
from pulling out several 
close meets," coach Jeff 
Hennessy said. "It looks 
like Heather Rendle will 
miss some or all of the rest 
of the indoor season and 
she would have made a 
difference." 



Coach Of Year 



Ron Glennon of Quincy, 
head coach at Duxbury 
High School, has been 
named the Division 2 
Coach of the Year on the 
1992 All-Scholastic boys' 
cross-country. 

An assistant since 1978 
at Boston College High 
School and Brookline, 
Glennon 's first venture into 
head coaching was 
extremely successful as he 



directed Duxbury to a 7-1 
dual-meet record and 
second-place finishes in 

both the Eastern Mass. and 
the state meets. 

"This team performed 
as well as any I have ever 
coached," said Glennon, 
who top runner, Brian 
Dowd, was selected as the 
Boston Globe All- 
Scholastic Division 2 
Runner of the Year. 



Peterson, Warren Fong 
and Gott also won. 

Placing second were 
Kevin Price in the hurdles, 
Chris Sullivan in the mile 
and Kenney in the 300. 
Price placed third in the 
high jump. 

The Raiders defeated 
Archbishop Williams, 53- 
33, with Gott winning the 
600, Eric Torvi the mile, 
Sullivan the two-mile. 
Price the hurdles, Gott the 
high jump, Dilks the 
shotput and the 4x400 
relay team of Fong, Chan, 
Torvi and Gott also won. 

Taking seconds were 
Peterson in the 50, Fong in 
the 600, Chan in the 1,000 
and Matt Fatseas in the 
two-mile. 



Placing third were 
Kenney in the 300, 
Fatseas in the mile, Brian 
O'Donnell in the two-mile, 
Jerry Marshall in the 
hurdles, Mike Duffy in the 
high jump and Peter 
Licciardi in the shotput. 

The Raiders topped 
Quincy, 67-24, with Gott 
winning the 600, Kabilian 
the 1,000, Torvi the mile, 
Sullivan the two-mile, 
Price the hurdles, Gott the 
high jump, Dilks the 
shotput, and the 4x400 
relay team of Fong, Torvi, 
Chan and Gott also won. 

North lost its opening 
meet of the year to 
Taunton, 48-43, and also 
bowed to Silver Lake, 51- 
40. 



Quincy, North Winter 
Home Sports Schedule 



Jan. 20 thru Jan. 26 



Wednesday, Jan. 20 

• Hockey, NQHS vs. Quincy @ Quincy, 5:30 
V, 7:50 JV. 

• NQHS wrestling vs. Weymouth, 7:00. 
Thursday, Jan. 21 

• QHS swimming vs. l\/lidclleboro. 

Friday, Jan. 22 

• NQHS boys basketball vs. Falmouth, 5:30 
JV, 7:00 V. 

• NQHS freshman boys basketball vs. 
A.W.H.S., 3:30. 

• QHS girls basketball vs. Weymouth, 3:30 
freshman, 5:30 JV, 7:00 V. 

Saturday, Jan. 23 

• QHS freshman boys basketball vs. 
Braintree, 1 0:00. 

• NQHS hockey vs. Falmouth, 6:40 JV, 7:50 
V. 

• QHS girls and boys winter track, Auerback 
Frosh-Soph Meet @ M.I.T. 

• QHS wrestling quad meet vs. Norwood, 
Xaverian and Canton, 1 1 :00. 

Sunday, Jan. 24 

• NQHS girls and boys winter track, Auerback 
Frosh-Soph Meet @ M.I.T. 

Tuesday, Jan. 26 

• QHS boys basketball vs. Bridgewater/ 
Raynham, 3:30 freshman, 5:30 JV, 7:00 V. 

• NQHS girls basketball vs. Bamstable, 5:30 
JV, 7:00 V. 

• NQHS freshman girls basketball vs. 
Braintree, 3:30. 

• NQHS boys swimming vs. Westwood. 



Page U Quincy Sun Thursday, January 21, 1993 



LEGAL HOnCSS 



LiQALNOTICBS 



LEGAL NOTICES 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 26A 
ORDERED: 



January 21, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy that 
the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, as 
amended be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. Stop- 
ping, Standing and Parking. Section 58. Parking prohibited 
on certain streets at all times. 

ADD THE FOLLOWING: 
"Marlboro Street. On the northerly side between Beach 
Street and Elm Avenue." 
PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1 , 1 993 
ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk of Council 
Approved January 1 3, 1 993 
James A. Sheets, Mayor 
A True Copy-Attest, Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 

1/21/93 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 44A 
ORDERED: 



December?, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy that 
the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, as 
amended be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. After Section 1 2 ADD SEC- 
TION 12 A. National Rood Insurance Program. 

"The City of Quincy shall participate in the National Flood 

Insurance Program and its community rating system 
annually and shall adopt any further ordinances neces- 
sary to implement this program." 
PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1 ,1 993 
ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk Of Council 
Approved January 13,1993 
James A. Sheets, Mayor 
A True Copy, Attest: Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 
1/21/93 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 295 
ORDERED: 



December?, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy that 
the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, as 
amended be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. Stop- 
ping, Standing and Parking. Section 69A. Requiring desig- 
nated parking space-disabled Veterans and Handicapped 
persons. Add the following: 

HANCOCK STREET - Westerly Side 372 ft. south of 

Wentworth St. to 392 Ft. South of Wentworth St. 

(St. Ann's Church - Left of Rectory Driveway) 

SPECIAL NOTE: Church will give specific instructions 
relative to installation of the sign. 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1 ,1993 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk Of Council 

Approved January 13,1993 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 

A True Copy, Attest: Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 

1/21/93 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 298 
ORDERED: 



December?, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the revised ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 976, as 
amended be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. Stop- 
ping, Standing and Parking. Section 59. ONE HOUR 
PARKING on certain streets: exception. Strike out the 
following: 

GRANITE ST. 368-373 Granite St. South Side of Granite 
Street. 1 4 Feet East of Water Street to 58 Feet East of 
Water St. 
PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1 ,1993 
ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk Of Council 
Approved January 1 3.1 993 
James A. Sheets, Mayor 
A True Copy, Attest: Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 
1/21/93 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 298A 
ORDERED: 
December?, 1992 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the revised ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 976, as 
amended be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 63. Thirty minute 
parking on certain streets. Exceptions - Add the following 
words :f 

GRANITE STREET South Side - 14 Feet east of Water 
Street to 58 Feet East of Water St. - (368-373 Water St.) 
PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1 ,1993 
ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk Of Council 
Approved January 1 3,1 993 
James A. Sheets, Mayor 
A True Copy, Attest: Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 
1/21/93 

CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 301 
ORDERED: 
December?, 1992 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the revised ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 976, as 
amended be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article V. Sec. 
89. One Way Street. Add the following: 
DO NOT ENTER - On PIERMONT STREET at intersec- 
tion of Harvard Street. Trial Period of 60 Days. 
PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1 ,1 993 
ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk Of Council 
Approved January 13,1993 
James A. Sheets, Mayor 
A True Copy, Attest: Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 
1/21/93 

CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 303 
ORDERED: 
December?, 1992 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the revised ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 976, as 
amended be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 63. Thirty minute 
parking on certain streets. Exceptions - Add the Following 
Words: 

HALL PLACE - On the north side a distance of 17 feet 

East of Willard Street to 35 Feet East of Willard Street. 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1 ,1993 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk Of Council 

Approved January 1 3,1 993 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 

A True Copy, Attest: Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 

1/21/93 

CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 317 
ORDERED: 
December 7, 1 992 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the revised ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 976, as 
amended be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 58. Parking 
prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add the following: 

DEE ROAD on the Westerly Side from Whiton Ave. to 
Washington St. 
PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1 ,1993 
ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk Of Council 
Approved January 13,1993 
James A. Sheets, Mayor 
A True Copy, Attest: Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 
1/21/93 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 344 
ORDERED: 
December?, 1992 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the revised ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 976, as 
amended be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXX. Salaries. Sec- 
tion 1 51 . General Salary Classification and Wage Sched- 
ule. Add the following: 

TITLE SALARY 

Health Plan Administrator $5,000.00 

Effective Date November 1 , 1992 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1 ,1993 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk Of Council 

Approved January 13,1993 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 

A True Copy, Attest: Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 

1/21/93 



iNVITATIONroeiO 



INVITATION TO BID 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

Department of Public Works 

Hon. Dsond S. Mcintosh Building 

55 Sea Street, Quincy, MA 02169 

Sealed bids for the construction of a portion of Pine Hill 
Cemetery will be received by the Cemetery Department and 
the Department of Public Works at the offices of the Com- 
missioner of Public Works, 55 Sea Street, Quincy, MA 
021 69 until 1 0:00 AM, local time, on Tuesday, February 1 6, 
1 993, at which time and place they will be publicly opened 
and read aloud. 

The work under this contract consists of the construction of 
a portion of Pine Hill Cemetery. The work shall include 
clearing and grubbing, excavation, backfill, grading, learning, 
seeding, drainage works, water mains installation, road 
constmction, along with other associated work to complete 
the project. 

Plans, specifications and other contract documents may be 
secured at the Department of Public Works, 55 Sea Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169 on or after January 25, 1993. 
A non-refundable deposit of $60.00 in cash or check, 
payable to the City of Quincy, will be required for each set 
of Contract Documents. 

Bidders requesting Contract Documents by mail shall also 
include a separate non-refundable check payable to the 
City of Quincy in the amount of $1 5.00 per set to cover the 
costs of shipping. 

Each bid shall be accompanied by a bid security in the 
amount of five percent (5%) of the value of the bid in the form 
described in the Information for Bidders. 
The Successful Bidder must furnish a one hundred percent 
(1 00%) Construction Performance Bond and a one hundred 
percent (100%) Construction Payment Bond with a surety 
company acceptable to the City. 
The bidding and award of this Contract shall be in full 
compliance with Mass. General Laws, Chapter 30, Section 
39M, as last revised. 

Bidders attention is called to the requirements as to condi- 
tions of employment to be observed and minimum wage 
rates to be psiid, as determined by the Commissioner of 
Labor and Industries under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Law, Chapter 149, Sections 26 to 27D, inclusive. 
No Bidder may withdraw his bid within forty five (45) days, 
Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays excluded, after the 
actual date of the opening of the bids. 
Equal Employment Opportunity, Minority Business Enter- 
prises (MBE), and Women's Business Enterprise (WBE) 
policies of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
City of Quincy are applicable to this contract. The goals for 
this project are: 

1 . The Contractor shall maintain on this project a not less 
than 1 percent (1 0%) ratio of minority employee manhours 
to total manhours in each job category. 

2. A minimum of ten percent (1 0%) MBE participation and 
five percent (5%) WBE participation by state-certified MBEs 
andWBEs. The bidder shall submit completed MBE/WBE 
forms with the bid 

Failure to comply with these requirements may be deemed 
to render a proposal non-responsive. No waiver of any 
portion of these provisions will be granted. 
The City of Quincy has residency requirements for workers 
which provides for local preference in hiring on City-sup- 
ported construction projects. 

The City reserves the right to waive any informality in or to 
reject any or all Bids if deemed to be in their best interest. 



Raymond Cattaneo 
Executive Director 
Cemetery Department 

1/21/93 



David A. Colton 
Commissioner 
Department of Public Works 



Thursday, January 21, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 17 



LEGALNOnCE 



^nmwww 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 356 
ORDERED: December 21 , 1 992 

Be it Ordained by the City Council that the Revised 
Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 976, as amended by 
striking Chapter 2 Administration, Article XXXI - 
Commission on Handicapped Affairs, Sections 156-160 
Inclusive, and adding in its place the following: 
ARTICLE XXXI 
COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 

Section 156 Established 

There is hereby established in the City of Quincy a 
Commission on Disability. 
Section 157 Composition 

The Commission on Disability shall consist of nine 
members, all of whom shall be residents of the City of 
Quincy. In addition, there shall be three alternate 
members who, in the absence or inability of any member to 
attend and participate in the affairs of the commission, 
may be designated by the Chair to act in the place of a 
regular member. 
Section 158 Appointment; Terms; Vacancies 

Appointments to the commission shall be made by the 
Mayor for a term of three years, with three members and 
one alternate being appointed on the first Monday of each 
February. Vacancies as well as initial appointments shall 
be for the remainder of the unexpired term. A majority of 
the commission members shall consist of people with 
disabilities, one member shall be a member of the 
immediate family of a person with a disability and one 
member shall be either an elected or appointed city 
official. The commission shall annually elect a Chair from 
among its members. 
Section 159 Duties 

The commission shall (1) research local problems of 
people with disabilities; (2) advise and assist municipal 
officials and employees in ensuring compliance with state 
and federal laws and regulations that affect people with 
disabilities; (3) coordinate or carry out programs 
designated to meet the problems of people with disabilities 
in coordination with programs of the Massachusetts office 
on disability; (4)b review and make recommendations 
about policies, procedures, services, activities and 
facilities of departments, boards and agencies of the city 
as they affect people with disabilities; (5) provide 
information, referrals, guidance and technical assistance 
to individuals, public agencies, businesses and 
organizations in all matters pertaining to disability; (6) 
coordinate activities of other local groups organized for 
similar purposes. 
Section 160 Ruies and Regulations 

The commission shall adopt and may from time to time 
amend rules and regulations establishing a time for their 
regular meetings and for their government and the 
management of projects within their jurisdiction. They shall 
annually submit to the Mayor a report of their activities for 
the prior year. 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JANUARY 1 1 , 1 993 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk Of Council 

Approved January 13, 1993 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 

A True Copy, Attest: Joseph P. Shea, City Clerk 
1/21/93 



iiiiiiiiiiHiHH 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCH/>SING DEPARTMENT 

1305 HANCOCK ST., QUiNCY. MA 02169 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and 

delivering to the City of Quincy: 

D/P/W: 

(1) FRONT END LOADER/3.00 YD3 BUCKET. 

FEBRUARY 9, 1993 @ 10«0 A.M. 

D/P/W: 

(1) FRONT END LOADER/4.0 YD3 BUCKET, FEBRUARY 

9, 1993 @ 10:30 A.M. 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the 

Purchasing Agent, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., 

Quincy, MA 02169. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery dates 

arnj any allowable discounts. 

Firm bW prices will be given first conskJeration and will be 

received at the office of the Purchasing Agent until the 

time and date stated above, at which time and date they 

will be publicly opened and read. 

BWs must be in a sealed envelope. The outside of the 

sealed envelope is to be clearly marked, "BID 

ENCLOSED" with time/date of bid call. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to accept 

any part of a bid or the one deemed best for the City. 

James A. Sheets, MAYOR 
Robert F. Denvir Jr., PURCHASING AGENT 
1/21/93 




BUY U.5. 
SAVINGS BONDS 



::;iJ<iM^y:iiiiii| 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 335 
ORDERED: November 16, 1992 

In Accordance with the provistons of Chapter 89, Section 
9, of the General Laws the following streets are 
designated as Stop Streets at the intersection and in the 
direction indicated. 



STREET NAME 
Sumner St. 



INTERSECTION 
Winihrop Park 



DIRECTION 
Northerly 



A True Copy 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk of Council 
1/21/93 

CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 335A 
ORDERED: November 16. 1992 

In Accordance with the provisions of Chapter 89, Section 
9. of the General Laws the following streets are 
designated as Stop Streets at the intersection and in the 
direction indicated: 



STREET NAME 
South Walnut St. 



1/21/93 



INTERSECTION 
Sumner St. 



DIRECTION 
Southeasterly 



A True Copy 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk of Council 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 336 
ORDERED: November 16, 1992 

In Accordance with the provisions of Chapter 89, Section 
9, of the General Laws the following streets are 
designated as Stop Streets at the intersection and in the 
direction indicated: 



STREET NAME 
Mears Ave. 



1/21/93 



INTERSECTION 
Sumner St. 



DIRECTION 
Northerly 



A True Copy 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk of Council 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 337 
ORDERED: November 16. 1992 

In Accordance with the provisions of Chapter 89. Section 
9, of the General Laws the following streets are 
designated as Stop Streets at the intersection and in the 
direction indicated: 



STREET NAME 
Bay View Ave. 



1/21/93 



INTERSECTION 
Sea St. 



DIRECTION 
Southeasterly 



A True Copy 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk of Council 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 338 
ORDERED: November 16, 1992 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 

follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 

1 976, as amended, k>e further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12, Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 58. Parking 
prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add the 
following: 

Marlboro St. on the North side between Beach and Willet 
Sts. 

A True Copy 
ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk of Council 
1/21/93 

CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 339 
ORDERED: November 11, 1992 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy 
that the revised ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12, Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article iV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 69A. Requiring 
designated parking space-disabled Veterans and 
Handicapped person. Add the following: 

Beale St. on the Northerly at a point beginning 25* in from 
Cushing St. for a distance of 20' in a westerly direction. 

A Tme Copy 
ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk of Council 
1/21/93 



.:ii¥S™W^^m¥;';W^lrf:#:!^ff*!ifli?;::: 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 339A 
ORDERED: November 1 1 , 1 992 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy 
that the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

in Chapter 12, Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article iV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 69A. Requiring 
designated parking space-disabled Veterans and 
Handicapped person. Add the following: 

Hancock St. on the westerly skie at a point beginning 30' 
in from Beale St. for a distance of 20' in a southerly 
direction. 

A True Copy 
ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk of Council 
1/21/93 

CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 339B 
ORDERED: November 1 1 , 1 992 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy 
that the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12, Motor Vehicles and Traffic, Article iV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 69A. Requiring 
designated parking space-disabled Veterans and 
Handica|)ped person. Add the following: 

Beach St. on the southerly side at a point beginning 60' 
east in from Hancock Street for a distance of 20' in an 
easterly direction. 

A True Copy 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk of Council 
1/21/93 



Mortgagee's Sale of Real Estate on the premises 

QUINCY 

2Mult^FamilyHomes 

95-97 Copeland Street 

FRIDAY, JAN. 29, 1993, 10:00 AM - REF « 146-93 

2 multi-family homes each with 3, 1 50 + SF of living area. Both 

buildings feature 4 units, each with 1 bdrm & 1 bath. Total of 8 

units located on a .25+ acre corner tot site. CentrsU heat/air. 

TERMS: $10,000 deposit in cash, certified or bank check at 

sale. Balance due in (30) days. Other terms, if any, announced 

at sale. Richard W. Keamey, Esq. 25 Accord Park Dr., Rockland. 

MA 02370. Atty. for Mortgagee. Norfolk Registry District of 

Land Court Certificate 130.719. Book 654. Pago 119. 

DIRECTIONS: Furnace Brook Parkway to Copeland Street 

■f^ Daniel J. 
Flynn A Co., Iiw. 



MA Lie *8S8 



ALJC TIDNEERS 

1-800-649-0018 



REAL ESTATE 

617-770-0444 



PUBLIC 



NOTICE 

The annual report of the Dunkin' Donuts 
Charitable Trust is available at the ad- 
dress noted below for inspection dur- 
ing normal business hours, by any citi- 
zen who so requests within 3 years 
after publication of this notice of its 
availability. 

Dunkin' Donuts Charitable Trust 
14 Pacella Parit Drive 
Randolph, MA 02368 

The principal manager Is Madelon l-eBlanc 
Telephone (617) 961-4000 



1/21 



Heart Attack. 
Fight it with a 
Memorial gift to 
the American 
Heart Association. 



THE AMERICAN HEART 

ASSOCIATION 
MEMORI AL PR OCRAM . 



Americcm Heart 
Associatton 

This ipaca provKM as a puMc a 







Page 18 Qttincy Sun Thursday, January 21, 1993 







City Hopes To Keep 
Pneumatic Scale 



GRAND OPENING-MacDonald's Ski Emporium recently held a ribbon cutting 
ceremony to celebrate its relocation to 166 Willard St. From left, Mayor James Sheets; 
owner Ekiward MacDonald; manager Jeffrey MacDonald; and Shirley MacDonald. 



Sheets Seeks Sewer, 
Water Rate Relief 



Cont'd From Page 1 

organize on behalf of the 
ratepayers. It's really 
going to take a joint effort 
by the authority and the 
federal and state 
governments, said Sheets, 
who also attended the 
inauguration of President 
Bill Clinton and Vice 
President Albert Gore 
Wednesday. 

In the long term. Sheets 
said Congress and 
President Clinton should 
adopt an 80-20 percent 






COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE 

AND FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P2977E1 

Estate of RUSSELL T. 

MAYO, Sr. late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent by proved and 
allowed and that THOMAS 
BOWE of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK by 
appointed executor named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 3, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-third 
day of December, one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/21/93 



federal government 
assistance program for 
water projects. Under such 
a program, the federal 
government would finance 
water projects essentially 
80 percent while the 
remaining 20 percent 
would be paid by state and 
local governments. 



similar program was 
dismantled shortly before a 
federal court ordered the 



liMMMMillMiiiHiiiiiiiiHiiMiMHiMiiiiiiiiMiiiM 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE 

AND FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P0007E1 

Estate of SEYMOUR M. 

JACOBS late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that RICHARD 
E. LEVIN of MARSHFIELD 
in the County of 
PLYMOUTH be appointed 
executor named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 3, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the sixth day of 
January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
1/21/93 



state clean up Boston 
Harbor. As a result, the 
cleanup is being financed 
largely by ratepayers in 
the 43 municipalities in 
the MWRA district. 

Sheets was expected to 
return to the city Thursday 
evening. He said he will 
arrange a meeting with 

MacDonald and Boston 
Mayor Ray Flynn on rate 
relief in the near future. 



tEGAtHOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE 

AND FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P3045E1 
Estate of MARY A. 
OILMAN late of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that PAUL F. 
OILMAN of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executor named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 17, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourth day of 
January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/21/93 



Cont'd From Page 1 

Kolson said. 

"I would like to keep 
them (Pneumatic Scale) 
in Quincy," Kolson said. 
"It means jobs and it 
means taxes." 

Kolson also said the 
company would generate 
traffic just twice a day as 
opposed to a retail use. 

Another possible 
scenario, which has been 
repeated by more than one 
city official, would have 
Pneumatic Scale obtain a 
parcel of land from the 
MWRA at the Fore River 
Shipyard. 

"We want a modern, 
single-story facility," said 
Lawson. "If a piece of the 
shipyard property could 
accommodate us, we 
would certainly consider 
it." 

City officials may try to 
ensure that Pneumatic 
Scale stays in Quincy. 
Stop & Shop must get a 
special permit from the 
city to convert the 
Pneumatic Scale site to 
retail use. 



City officials could use 
the leverage of the special 
permit to b'jck the Stop & 
Shop deal if Pneumatic 
Scale is unable to find a 
Quincy location. 

Lawson said he 
welcomes the help of the 
city in locating a new site. 
"There are not a lot of 
manufacturing sites in the 
city," he said. "It's a 
question of finding the 
right equation to benefit 
everyone concerned." 

Shaw's also will need a 
special permit to convert 
the Boston Gear site to 
retail use. 

An amendment to the 
city's zoning ordinance 
concerning special permits 
was introduced to the City 
Council's Ordinance 
Committee during the Jan. 
11 council meeting. 

The amendment would 
transfer control of the 
special permit frorp the 
Zoning Board of Appeals 
to the City Council. The 
amendment could be 
approved at a future 
council meeting. In last 



week's Quincy Sun it was 
incorrectly reported that 

the amendment had been 
adopted. 

The proposed Shaw's 
store would abut the 
MBTA tracks and a 375- 
car parking lot would 
extend out to Hancock 
Street. Boston Gear is 
situated on a 10 1/2-acre 
site and would maintain its 
offices on the remaining 
three acres. Boston Gear 
moved its production 
operations from the 
Norfolk Downs site in 
September of 1990. 

Shaw's officials will 
meet with neighbors to 
address concerns about the 
project, including traffic 
concerns, before seeking a 
special permit from the 
city, said Shaw's 
spokesman Brian Leahy. 

Leahy said the proposal 
calls for demolition of the 
front portions of the 
existing Boston Gear 
structure. He said 200 
construction jobs would be 
generated by the 
remodeling. 



Club Expansion Approved 



(Cont'd from Page 2) 

O'Driscoll. 

Health Commissioner 
Jane Gallahue, who 
recently visited the 
establishment, agreed. 

"I was satisfied with 
what 1 saw there," she 
said. 

Gallahue added that 
research she had 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

AND FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P0073E1 
Estate of MARY T. NEE 
late of QUINCY In the 
County of Norfolk 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
preser^d in the above- 
captioi^d matter praying 
that tl^ last will of said 
decedeTit be proved and 
allowed and that DENIS M. 
NEE of HANOVER in the 
County of PLYMOUTH be 
appointed executor named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 24, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the eleventh day 
of January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/21/93 



conducted since the 
board's Jan. 12 meeting 
showed that Shooter's has 
a General All-Purpose All- 
Alcoholic License, which 
means the establishment is 
not required to serve food. 
Although Shooter's is 
not equipped to serve hot 
foods, it does allow 
patrons to order food from 

UEOAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE 

AND FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P0027A1 
Estate of ANGELINA 
TRAVERNA late of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that BRIAN E. DONOVAN 
of QUINCY in the County 
of NORFOLK be appointed 
administrator of said 
estate with surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
February 24, 1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this eleventh day 
of January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/21/93 



the nearby 

Hollywood/Hollywood and 
Taso's Pizza restaurants, 
Gallahue said. Shooter's 
also has a vending 
machine on its premises 
and makes available 
prepackaged foods such as 
peanuts and potato chips. 

Shooters Club Cafe is 
located in the lower level 
of Quincy Fair Mall. 



ELEMENTARY 
LUNCH 



Jan. 25-29 

Men: pizza, fruit 
juice, chocolate chip 
cookies, milk. 

Tues: Early release 
day. No lunch served. 

Wed: peanut butter 
and jelly sandwich, 
celery sticks, chocolate 
chip cookies, milk. 

T h u r s : turkey 
fricassee, sweet potato, 
peas, fresh baked wheat 
roll, milk. 

Fri: grilled cheese 
sandwich, tater tots, fruit 
juice, milk. 



SECONDARY 
LUNCH 



Jan, 25-29 

Mon: pizza, green 
beans, apple crisp, milk. 

Tues: Early Release 
Day, Middle School. 
Hamburger on a roll, cole 
slaw or salad, fruit juice, 
jello, milk. 

Wed: stuffed shells 
with sauce, vegetable, 
fresh baked Italian roll, 
fruit juice, milk. 

Thurs: barbeque 
chicken, sweet potato, 
fresh baked wheat roll, 
jello, milk. 

Fri: baked lasagna 
with sauce, side order of 
rotini, vegetable, fresh 
baked italian roll, fruit 
juice, milk. 



Thursday, Januarj 21, 1993 Qulncy Sun Page 19 




EVERYBODrS MARKETPUCE 



WANTCD 



HAND TOOLS 
WANTED 

Wood or ste«l pianos. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tool chests, 
old hand tools, all trades 
(machinist, pattern maker, 
watchmaker, etc.) shop k>ts. 
Also, antiquarian books, 
frames, paintings. Antiques in 
estate k>ts. 

1-617-558-3839 tf 



THANK YOU 
St. Jude 

J.D. Wolatton 1/21 

Thank You 
Once Again 

ST JUDE 

for prayers answered 

N.M.M. 1/21 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEATLH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTT^ENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 91 P0962E1 
NOTICE OF 
FIDUCIARY'S ACCOUNT 
To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
William H. Marnell late of 
Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 72 that the First 
and Final account(s) of 
Clare L. Marneil as 
executrix (the fiduciary) of 
said estate has-have been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to 
preserve your right to file 
an objection to said 
account(s), you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before the 
seventeenth day of 
February, 1993 the return 
day of this citation. You 
may upon written request 
by registered or certified 
mail to the fiduciary, or to 
the attorney for the 
fiduciary, obtain without 
cost a copy of said 
account(s). If you desire 
to object to any item of 
said account(s), you must, 
in addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, 
file within thirty days after 
said return day or within 
such other time as the 
Court upon motion may 
order a written statement 
of each such item together 
with the grounds for each 
objection thereto, a copy 
to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to 
Mass. R. Civ. P. Rule 5. 

WITNESS, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this fourth day of 
January, 1993. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
1/21/93 



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Meetings, Banquets 

Elks Home, 440 E Squantum St 

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North Quincy K of C 

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5 Mollis Avenue 

For Information please call 

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Nickerson Post No. 382 

American LegkMi, Squantum, MA 

Handcapped AcoesaUa. 

Capacity 90 or less. 

Call 328-9824 

Monday through Saturday 4-7pmTF 



2 HALLS FOR RENT 

George F. Bryan Post 
1 suitaUe for large functions 
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small functions (120 people). 
Call the George F. Bryan Post 

Call 472-6234 3/4 
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COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COUFTT 

THE PROBATE AND 

AND FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P0065E1 
Estate of HENRY E. 
DILLON late of QUINCY In 
the County of Norfolk 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that ROBERT 
DILLON of WEYMOUTH in 
the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executor 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 24, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the eleventh day 
of January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/21/93 



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Call 617-770-4028 

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B C TILE 

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from. $6 per foot includes all 

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A&T VACUUM 

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• Sewing machln* repairing 

• VCR rapairing and deaning 
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• Elacirolux w^powar nozzle 

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• Used vaouuns $45 & i|) 

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INCOME TAX PREPARATION 

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Professional Service 

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CHRISTIAN DATING 

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Free Information packet 
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from $1 (U Repair). Delin- 
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current repo list. 1/28 



Typesetting Equipment 
For Sale 

2 Varityper Compact 3510 

with Fonts 

1 Selectline PermaKwIk 
Processor 

BEST OFFER 

The Quincy Sun 

1372 Hancock Street 

Quincy 02169 

471-3100 



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MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock SL, Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 



D Service* 

O For Sal* 

a Autos 

D BoaU 

O For R*nt 

a Wantad 

O H*lpWanl*d 

O P*ta, Livestock 

a Lost and Found 

O Raal Estat* For Sale 

D Raal Estat* Wanted 

O Miscellaneous 

D Work Wanted 

a Anllqu«s 

a Coins A Slamos 

D RasI Hom*s 

a Instruction 

Day Care 

D Personal 

a Electrical & Appliances 



RATES 
1WEBC 
S-TWEBCS 

•-12 WEEKS 

It WEEKS 
OR MORE 



D $5.00foronelnaartlon.upto20worda.1Wfor*Mh«dditton«lword. 
a $4.80 per Insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 Ineertlona of the same ad. 

10« each addittonal word. 
D $4.30 per Insertion up to 20 worda for 8-12 inaertiont of tha sama ad. 

10* more —ch additional word. 
D $4.00 per Inaertlon up to 20 words for 1 3 or more Inaertlons of the 

•ama ad, 10S each additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ 

in The Quincy Sun 



COPY:. 



.for the following ad to run 



.weeks 



NO REFUND WIU K MAOC AT THIS CONTRACT RATC IN THE EVENT OF CANCEUATION. 
DEAOUNE: MONDAY. S.-00 FJL FtEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMMR IN AD. 



J 



Page 20 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 21, 1993 



People Advance By Degrees 

At Quincy College you can begin your degree 
program this spring at either our Quincy or Ply- 
mouth campuses. We offer complete degree 
programs at both campuses. And unlike other 
schools we haven't increased tuition for four years. 
Take your next step forward now at Quincy College. 

• Earn an Associate's Degree or Certificate 

• Full and Part-time Programs offered Days, 
Evenings and Saturdays 

• 28 Majors and Concentrations to choose from 

• Financial Aid and Child Care available 

• Campuses conveniently located in Quincy 
and Plymouth 

Classes Begin January 26, 1993 

For more information call 

(508) 747-5523 Plymouth Campus 

(617) 984-1700 Quincy Campus 





Quincy 
College 



34 Coddington Street, Quincy, MA 02169 
1 1 North Street, Plymouth, MA 02360 



QUINCY SUN 1992 "Citizen of tlie Year" Stephen Cantelli assists one of his fifth grade 
students at the Lincoln Hancock Community School. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

27 Other Nominees For 
'Citizen Of Year' Award 



(Cont'd from Page 5) 

•Charles 
MacLaughlin, director of 
Heritage Program at 
Quincy High School, for 
his special attention and 
devotion to his students. 

•Ruth Norton, 

volunteer at St. Boniface 
Church, Quincy 

Community Action Center, 



SOUTH SHORE BUICK 



DRIVE A BRAND NEW 



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SOUTH 



Gemiantown Neighborhood 
Center, Snug Harbor 
School, and Quincy PAL. 

•Leo Nunnari, for 
devoting much of his life 
to volunteering his time to 
the Quincy Lodge of Elks' 
charitable works for the 
seniors, the veterans and 
the disabled. 

•The late Dr. Cecil R. 
Paul, posthumously, for 
achievements in the 
community and at Eastern 
Nazarene College. 

•Mayor James Sheets, 
for beautifying the city 
through his Cleaner, 
Greener QuiiKy Program. 

•Olin Taylor, a 
member of the Quincy 
Conservation Commission 




and a retired machinist, he 
voluntarily repairs veterans 
markers at Quincy 
cemeteries 

•Ned Tobin, for 
helping the kids of the 
community with family 
problems, sports and 
academics. 

•Recreation Director 
Barry Welch, for 
organizing athletic and 
recreational events for 
people of all ages. 

•Claudia Westcott, as 
Nautilus director at the 
South Shore YMCA, she 
helps counsel the youth of 
Quincy. 

George White, for 
organizing the Quincy 
Christmas Festival Parade. 



SHORE 



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p. windows & locks, anti-lock brakes, a/c, r. def ., delay wipers, tilt, 
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TOTAl 
PAYMENTS 



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With 10»4 down, »1452 down pmt. required, based on 46 mo Smartlease. Subject to GMAC approval 1st mo pmt 4 
refundable sec, dep. due at time of delivery. Total due at delivery = »i 91 7. Sales tax, excise tax & reg fees not included 



Panelists who selected 
the 1992 Quincy Sun 
"Citizen of the Year" 
were: 

•James (Jay) Asher, 
president of WJDA Radio, 
and active in the Rotary 
Club and South Shore 
YMCA. 

•Dr. Sheldon Bennett, 
minister. United First 
Parish Church. 

•John DeCarli, 
chairman Board of Trust 
and past president, Quincy 
Sons of Italy Lodge. 

•Lt. Normand 

Goyette, Quincy Police 



Department and special 
aide to Police Chief 
Francis Mullen. 

•Frank Kearns, 1991 
Quincy Sun Citizen of the 
Year. 

•Joseph Shea, Quincy 
City Qeric. 

•Caryn Smith, owner 
of Caryn 's Corner and 
member of the Quincy 
Center Bu.<^^iness and 
Professional Board of 
Directors. 

•Henry Bosworth, 
publisher. The Quincy Sun. 
•Robert Bosworth, 
editor. The Quincy Sun. 



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1988 BUICK CENTURY 

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Full size wgn., full pwr., V8. 

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1985 OLDS CIERAWGN. 

V6, air cond., low, low mi., 

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1988 OLDS DELTA 88 

4 dr. sdn., full pwr., full size, 

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1989 BUICK REGAL 

2 dr. hard top, p. windows & 

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1986 BUICK REGAL LTD. 

2dr. cpe., V8, fullpwr.. 

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1988 BUICK REGAL CPE. 

Ver>' low mi., very clean 

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1993 FORD ESCORT LX 

Air cond., less than 500 mi . 

"Great warranty, economical, 

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1985 CHEVROLET CELEBRrTY 

4 dr. sdn., pwr. windows & locks, 

air cond. very low mileage 

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€3 






VOL.25 No. 19 



Thursday, January 28, 1993 




30^ 



West Quincy Blaze 




THREE-ALARM FIRE destroyed the home of Stanley TraA at 24 Woodcllflf Rd., West 
Quincy, Jan. 20 at 9:30 a.m. Fire department olHcials said the blaze began in the basement 
as trash was being burned hi a fireplace. Flames spread hito the walk then up through to the 
roof. Firefighters had to evacuate as the roof and floor began to coDapse. Trask, 84, and his 
wife wo-e treated for smoke hihalation. Damage was estimated at $150,000. Deputy Chief 
Joseph Jackson recovered some spedal family items inchiding the couple's wedding picture. 




QUINCY FIREFIGHTER Steven Sweet Is examined by Norfolk-Bristol Ambulance EMTs 
Debra Downey and Brad Newbury after he was felled by smoke inhalation while fighting a 
three-alarm blaze at 24 WoodclifTRd. Sweet was one of three firefighters injured battling the 
stubborn fire. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 



Neighborhood Meeting Feb. 4 

Residents Protest 
700-Foot Tower 



About a dozen residents 
showed up at City Hall 
MoiKlay to protest a 700- 
foot telecommunications 
tower which was erected a 
few weeks ago near 
Ricciuti Drive in West 
Quincy. 

Neighbors are 

concerned about possible 
health hazards and also 
say its an eyesore which 
hurts property values. 

The issue was 
scheduled to be discussed 
at a Conservation 
Commission meeting 
Wednesday, Jan. 27, at 
7:30 p.m. at City Hall. 

Ward 4 City Councillor 
Thomas Fabrizio said he 
has scheduled a 
nei^borhood meeting for 
Thursday, Feb. 4 at City 



HaU. 

The Conservation 
Commission issued a 
cease-and-desist order to 
Frank DiRico of Quincy, 
owner of Industrial 
Communications and 
Electronics of Kingston, 
owner of the tower. The 
order states that no further 
work is to be done on the 
tower until further notice. 

DeRico has said he 
plans to install up to 24 
antennas on the tower and 
may also mount 
microwave dishes on the 
structure. 

Fabrizio said the 
Conservation Commission 
is attempting to obtain a 
court order to back up their 
own order. Fabrizio said 
DiRico has ignored the 
Commission's order. 



Nearby residents have 
complained that they were 
not notified that the tower 
had been proposed. 

"We are notified when 
a telephone pole is being 
put up but not when a 700- 
foot tower goes up," said 
one woman. 

The Zoning Board of 
Appeals is required to 
notify any residents living 
within 300 feet of any 
proposal that requires a 
special permit. The ZBA 
did hold public hearings on 
the tower but neighbors 
were not directly notified 
because they do not live 
close enough to the site. 

Fabrizio said he is 
opposed to the tower and 
will work to have it 
removed or reduced. 

-STEVE KAVANAGH 



Two Developers Call Project 'Doable' 

Hancock Lot 

Retail Project 

Drawing Interest 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

The city's proposal to develop the Hancock Parking Lot has generated 
considerable interest from developers with at least two saying the project is 
"doable," city officials said Tuesday. 



The city's plan to 
develop the Hancock 
Parking Lot has generated 
considerable interest from 
developers with at least 
two saying the project is 
"doable," city officials 
said Tuesday. 

According to Planning 
Director Richard Meade, 9 
or 10 developers have 
requested a copy of the 
RFP (Request for 
Proposal) and have 
indicated they will likely 
submit bids before the Feb. 
16 deadline. He said two 
of those bidders are certain 
the project can work and 
will submit bids detailing 
the specifics of tbeii own 
concept of the project 
before next month's 
deadline. 

"I know of 9 or 10 
bidders who have 



requested a copy of the 
FRP and I know of at least 
two (bidders) who have 
said yes, 'this is a doable 
project' and this is what 
well do,' meaning 
specifics," Meade said. 

"There are people out 
there who want to work 
with us and that's a good 
sign. It's part of the 
positive attitude that's 
been generated by the 
downtown improvements." 

Mayor James Sheets 
said he is pleased with the 
response. 

"It (the project) is 
extremely important for 
the future of die downtown. 
If you're going to attract 
retail, you need a good 
retail mix. To do that, you 
need to add retail space. 

"It's exciting to have 
that many people looking 



at it. We also diiink it's a 
doable project." 

Sheets said the city 
does not have a plan to 
develop the Hancock 
municipal parking lot 
across from the Quincy 
District Courthouse but 
merely an undefined 
concept of a large retail 
complex. He said the 
precise design of such a 
complex will be 
determined by the bids 
received. 

"We don't have a plan. 
We have a concept. The 
bids are asking for plans. 
We're not sure what we'll 
get," the mayor said. 

Sheets informed Th e 
Quincy Sun of the city's 
intent to develop the 5.5- 
acre lot a week before his 
Mid-Term Address Jan. 4. 

(Cont'd on Page IS) 



Toland Leaves Council, 
Seen Asst. City Clerk 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

Patricia Toland 
resigned from the City 
Council Tuesday after 
more than 17 years in 
elected office. 

She said she hopes to 
continue to serve the 
citizens of Quincy as 
assistant city clerk. 

Toland, considered the 
leading candidate for the 
assistant clerk's post, said 
she is hopeful that she will 
be nominated and 
^proved for the job. 

"If it's to be than I hope 
to serve there in a way to 
benefit the citizens of 
Quincy," Toland said. 

Councillor-at-Large 
Michael Cheney has 
proposed that the assistant 
clerk's position by made 
part-time. Cheney has also 
said the Toland may have 
violated state ethics 
regulations when she 
asked feUow councillors to 
support her for the 
assistant cleric's job. 

Toland said she would 
"possibly" still be 
interested in the job if it 
becomes part time. "I 
haven't thought about it," 
she said. 

Toland, a Wollaston 
resident, is the first City 




PATRICIA TOLAND 

Councillor to resign during 
a term in office since Paul 
Harold left in 1978 after 
being elected state 
Senator. 

"It's been a joy and a 
privilege to serve, I'm now 
in my 18th year," Toland 
said. 'It's been a wonderful 
opportunity and I thank the 
people of Quincy for 
giving it to me, they've 
been very generous." 

Toland served six years 
on the School Committee 
after being elected in 1975 
and is in her 12th year on 
the Council. 

"The important part of 
government is listening to 
people and carrying out 
their wishes," Toland said. 
"I think Fve always tried to 
do that." 



She said some of the 
council's 

accomplishment's of which 
she is most proud include: 

•The development of 
President's Place in 
C^incy Center. Toland was 
chairman of the Downtown 
Development Committee 
when the project was 
designed. 

"1 feel very proud. I had 
an impact on that design," 
she said. 

•The construction of a 
new wing at Quincy 
Hospital. Toland was 
chairman of the Health 
and Hospital Committee 
when the bond for the 
project was issued. 

"We had a lot of 
controversial meetings... 
but the project finally went 
forward," she said. 

•The development of 
Marina Bay. 

"There was nothing 
there when I came to the 
Council. Now it has grown 
into a full-fledged, bustling 
community, it's an 
addition to the tax base 
and a place where people 
enjoy spending leisure 
time." 

•City beautification. 
Toland was chairman of 

(ConfdonPagtZO) 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 28, 1993 

McArdle Family 

New Owners Of 

Hancock Tobacco 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

From now on, it's going 
to be all in the family at 
the Hancock Tobacco 
store, 1500 Hancock St. 

"All five of our children 
are working there," said 
Nancy McArdle of Quincy, 
new co-owner of the store 
with her husband, Joseph 
McArdle Jr. "And so is our 
daughter-in-law." 

The store, which was 
taken over by the 
McArdles Jan. 4, is being 
managed by their son 
Michael. In addition, sons 
Joseph III, Frank and 
Sean, daughter Marie 
Davis and daughter-in-law 
Dawn (Joseph Ill's wife) 
are all participating in the 
new family business. 

The McArdles are 
lifelong residents of 
Quincy and have been 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



active in the Quincy Elks. 
Mrs. McArdle said both 
her husband and Michael 
are past Exalted Rulers of 
the Elks and Frank is 
currently a Loyal Knight. 

She added that the 
family will continue 
Hancock Tobacco's "fine 
tradition of quality 
service" and plans to offer 
new items to the public in 
the near future. 

"We're going to be 
selling hats, t-shirts and 
sweatshirts, baseball cards 
and lots of other little 
novelty items, as well as 
paperback books," she 
said. 

The store, which was 
formerly known as 
Caradonna's, has been 
located at its present site 
on the comer of Cottage 
Ave. for more than 40 
years. The McArdles 
obtained the business fi^om 
previous owners Benjie 
Beberman and Dick 
DiSalvio. 



THE LEGAL ADVICE 

AND 

REFERRAL CLINIC 

DO YOU HAVE 

A LEGAL QUESTION 

OR - ARE YOU CONFUSED 

ABOUT A LEGAL ISSUE? 

The Bar Association of Norfolk 
County is sponsoring legal clin- 
ics to assist you with questions. 
There will be a panel of attor- 
neys volunteering their time to 
assist you. 

WHERE? 

QUINCY DISTRICT COURT 

1 Dennis Ryan Pkwy 

Quincy, MA 01269 

WHEN? 

FEBRUARYS, 1993 

(Wednesday Evening) 

TIME? 
6:00 PM TO 8:00 PM 

Our panel specializes in the following: 
Divorce and Family, Criminal, Wills, Trusts, 
Bankruptcy, Malpractice, Tax Matters, 
Landlord/Tenant, and all other legal mat- 
ters. 

The above is a public service to the com- 
munity and all are invited to attend. This 
will be held on a first come, first served 
basis, and is free of charge to the public. 
You will have a one on one consultation 
with an attorney who specializes in the 
area of the law you may have a question 
in. 

ADRIENNE CLARKE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
BAR ASSOCIATION OF NORFOLK COUNTY 



Quincy College Governance 
Committee Begins Task 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

The Quincy College 
Governance Committee 
will bold its second 
meeting today (Thursday) 
to tackle the question of 
how the school should be 
directed in the future. 

The Committee began 
its task last week when it 
held it's first meeting. 

Committee chairman 
Linda Stice, a School 
Committee member, said 
she anticipates the 
Governance Committee 
will have a recommend- 
ation ready for Mayor 
James Sheets and the City 
Council by April 1. 

"I think we (committee) 
were all happy to see that 
we have much more 
common ground than we 
realized," Stice said. 

Public input is welcome 
at the committee's 
meeting today at 11 a.m. 
at Qty Hall, Stice said. 

The committee will 
meet again next Thursday 
at City Hall at 3:30 p.m. 
Meetings will be posted 
and are open to the public, 
Stice said. A public 
hearing will also be 
announced. 

The college is presently 
governed by the School 
Committee and 

Superintendent of School 
Eugene Creedon. 



Critics of the current 
system say the school has 
grown too large and needs 
its own governing board 
and that the administrative 
duties involving the 
college take away time 
Creedon and the School 
Committee should be 
focusing on the public 
schools. 

A new system could 
have Quincy College 
President O. Clayton 
Johnson report to a Board 
of Trustees instead of 
Creedon. Under the current 
system the college's Board 
of Trustees serves in an 
advisory capacity and 
assists with fiindraising. 

Stice said the 
committee's purpose is to 
recommend a new form of 
governance at Quincy 
College "and to refine 
what the continuing 
relationship between the 
college and city should be. 

"We'll recommend who 
should comprise a new 
Board of Trustees and how 
they should be selected," 
Stice said. 

Some of the 
committee's work has 
already been done, Stice 
said. A task force has 
already reviewed the 
teachers' contract. 



"We went over what 
relates to the college and 
what doesn't," Stice said. 

Teachers at Quincy 
College are municipal 
employees and members 
of the Quincy Education 
Association, the same 
union as teachers in the 
Quincy Public Schools. 

QEA officials have 
expressed concern 
regarding tenure, pensions 
and other issues in the 
event of a change of 
governance. 

Task force members 
included Ivan Smith of 
Quincy College, Mary 
Pace and Tom Walsh, 
president, both of the 
QEA, and School 
Committee members Peg 
King, Dan Raymondi and 
Stice. 

"We cleared up where 
the contract needed 
revision to be 'college 
specific,'" Stice said. 

The Governance 
Committee, created by 
Sheets, includes 13 
members. They are, Stice 
and Steve Durkin of the 
School Committee; 
Johnson and Quincy 
College Director of 
Admissions Lori 

Tomassetti; Walsh and 
Creedon; Quincy College 



student government 
president Sean Chisholm; 
Charles Sweeny of the 
Board of Trustees; the 
mayor's administrative 
assistant Bernice Mader; 
City Solicitor Steve 
McGrath; Sheila Mclntyre 
of CoUege Courses, Inc., a 
group of private citizens 
which helped found the 
college and helps support 
the school financially; and 
city councillors Tom 
Fabrizio and Larry 
Chretien. 

City Councillor Tim 
Cahill was asked to be on 
the committee but 
declined. Cahill said the 
matter should be dealt 
with through the council's 
Education Committee 
which discussed the issue 
this past October. 

Cahill has proposed a 
home rule petition calUng 
for a new governance 
system at the college. He 
and Johnson have 
criticized the new 
committee and called it a 
stall tactic by Sheets. 

Once the committee 
makes a recommendation 
it must be approved by the 
mayor. City Council and 
the state legislature. 



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(Next to Pat Flanagan's) 

472-5256 



Morrissey, Mariano Concerned 

Over Future Development 

At Fore River Shipyard 



In a letter to the 
executive director of the 
Massachusetts Water 
Resources Authority, Sen. 
Michael Morrissey and 
Rep. Ronald Mariano 
expressed their on going 
concern about the future 
development at the Fore 
River shipyard. 

The Quincy legislators 
asked Doug McDonald 
that any future contracts or 
awards to current or future 
tenants be made with the 
knowledge and advice of 
the City of Quincy and 
Town of Braintree, the two 
municipalities which 
border the shipyard site. 

"The re-development 
and re-use of the sbdpyard 
property is one of the 
highest priorities," 
Mariano said. 

Morrissey added, "We 
must work to get the 
property back on the tax 



roles and productive 
again." 

Both legislators 
expressed their concern 
that future development or 
use of the property should 
not adversely affect the 
Quincy Point and East 
Braintree area. The recent 
contract award to Fore 
River Shipyard & Iron 
Works, Inc. to dismantle 
six Navy destroyers caused 
some immediate concern 
to local residents, Mariano 
said. 

"The project is 
expected to employ 45-50 
union shipbuilders but 
more long range planning 
and development must be 
coordinated and identified 
so that we maintain a 
stable shipbuilding 
workforce," said Mariano, 
whose district includes the 



Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St., Quincy Center 
Video Duplication 
Special This Week 

Share Your Taped 
Holiday Memories 

472-7131 



shipyard property. 

Morrissey was critical 
of the MWRA's failure to 
inform residents and local 
officials or be able to 
adequately answer initial 
questions and concerns 
over the recent contract 
and uses at the shipyard. 

"Simple 
communication and 
information sharing by the 
MWRA will go along way 
to better community 
relations and alleviate 
fears," said Morrissey. 
The MWRA is one of the 
largest industrial and 
business property owners 

in Quincy and they are 
obligated to local residents 
and residents to help 
safely redevelop that area 
to compatible industrial 
use, he added. 



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472-2177 



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Thursday, January 28, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Cahill Sells Restaurant, 
Ponders Mayoral Run 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

Citing both personal 
and political reasons, City 
Councillor Timothy Cahill 
has decided to sell his 
Quincy Square business, 
Handshakes Cafe. 

The Quincy License 
Board Tuesday granted 
Cahill's request to transfer 
the Common Victualer 
License of the cafe, 
located at 1354 Hancock 
St., to Paul Bast of 
Braintree. 

Cahill, 34, who has 
owned Handshakes for 10 
1/2 years, told the board 
he felt confident leaving 
the business in Bast's 
hands. 

"Mr. Bast has a lot 
more experience than I 
had, and probably will 
ever have, in the 
restaurant business," said 
Cahill, who added that "I 
feel that I'm leaving him 
with a good business." 

Cahill also thanked the 
board for its past support. 

"I especially want to 
thank the Health 
Department, which is the 
department I deal with the 
most, for always being 
very fair with me over the 
years," he said. 

Cahill said Bast plans 
to keep the operation of 




TIM CAHILL 

Handshakes as is, noting 
that all employees who 
wish to continue working 
at the cafe will be kept 
and no physical changes in 
the structure of the 
business are planned. 

Following the meeting, 
Cahill said there were 
several reasons that 
factored into his decision 
to sell the cafe, one of 
which is his belief that 
politics and business do 
not mix well. 

"One of the things that 
has hurt my business over 
the years has been my 
involvement in politics," 
he said. "I think 
Handshakes should be 
judged as a restaurant and 
not by its owner." 

Cahill, whose name has 



come up of late as a 
potential mayoral 
candidate, stressed that he 
did not sell Handshakes so 
that he can expose Mayor 
James Sheets in the 
November election. He 
added that his decision to 
run for mayor will not be 
made until the end of 
February. 

Cahill also noted that 
his reasons for selling were 
"not purely political." 

"I've been doing this 
(working in the food 
industry) for almost 11 
years," he said. "I've been 
in it long enough, and 
basically now I'm looking 
to get off and doing other 
things. 

"Business has been 
very good to me, and I've 
been very lucky. I just felt 
that the time was right." 

Cahill said he has no 
immediate plans on what 
he will do next, other than 
a two-week February 
vacation in Florida with 
his family, but added that 
he is not worried about 
income. 

"My main priority is to 
support my family," he 
said. "Certainly there's a 
risk involved (in selling 
the business), but I've 
always been a risk-taker 
and hopefully I will be for 
the rest of my life." 



$4,000 Approved For Germantown Sports 



The City Council voted 
Monday to extend the 
Snug Harbor Youth 
Activities program by 
approving $4,000 from the 
city's UDAG block grant 
account. 

The program currendy 
features after school 
basketball leagues for 
Germantown elementary 
and middle school boys 
and girls at Snug Harbor 
School. 

Ward 1 Councillor 
Peter Kolson said he 
would like to expand the 
program to include 
volleyball, weightlifting 
and other activities. 



"The extension of the something that is very 
athletic program is worthwhile," Kolson said. 



.oseannl^ 



Fine Handcrafts 

0^ * 



-€^ 



Floral Creations 



Free demonstration on macrame' given by Pal Moscone 

on Wednesday February 10th 6:30 - 7:30 pm 

Pkase fe«l free to drop in 

We now featue the works of over 72 crafters. 

Booth sizes still available 

773-4353 

1089 Hancock St, Quincy (Center 



Qrand Opening! 

Hancock Tobacco 

for all your tobacco needs 

Under New Ownership 

Joe & Nancy McArdle 

Featuring 

Low-priced cigarettes 

large selection of 

magazines and newspapers 

2 lottery machines 

Coming Soon: Paperback books 

1500 Hancock St., Quincy Center 

770-3422 




♦EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION' baoner was donated by Ward 1 Conndllor Peter 
Kokon to Broad Meadows Middle School in honor or their national educational awards, 
indnding the prestigious Blue Ribbon Award. Acting Principal Tom Marks offered 
thanks and appreciation. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Employees Lobby Council 
To Keep Nursing Home Open 



More than a dozen 
employees of the 
Presidential Convalescent 
Home, Old Colony Ave., 
Wollaston, lobbied the 
City Council Monday 
night to help keep the 
financially troubled 
nursing home open. 

The home has been 



ordered closed next month 
by a judge. Presidential 
owes back taxes to the 
city and also has other 
debts. 

Workers asked the 
council to explore the 
possibility of the city 
forgiving the interest and 
fines incurred on its back 



taxes to give a new owner 
a chance at reviving the 
business. 

City Solicitor Steve 
McGrath said the home 
has a potential buyer who 
is awaiting £q>proval of a 
small business loan. 

"The bankruptcy court 

(ConfdonPage20) 



Look What Willits Wind 
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in such a winning performer. From the soccer field to the 
backyard, your chUd is ready for action in Wilhts Wind. 

Leather Sneakers 

size 5 infants to 

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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 28, 1993 



LC3r 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co Inc 

1372 Hancock SI . Qumcy, Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworlh Jr , Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth. Editor 



30( p«r copy. $12.00 per year by rrtall in Quincy 
$14.00 per year by mail outside Quincy. $17 00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun. 1372 Hancock St Quincy Mass 02169 



The Quincy Sun assumes nc (mancial responsibility (or 
typographica' errors m adwenisements but will reprint thai 
part ol an adverliserrent in which the typographical error 
occurs 



''siem,- 



Telephone Directories 
Can Be Recycled 



Delivery of the NYNEX 
Yellow Pages and NYNEX 
White Pages for Boston is 
under way in Quincy and 
residents will be able to 
recycle their out-of-date 
telephone directories. 

Quincy's recycling 
center, at 55 Sea St., 
accepts telephone books 
year round and is open 24 
hours. 

Quincy is one of the 12 
communities in Greater 
Boston to offer directory 
recycling. 

"NYNEX is working to 
develop recycling markets 



ELEMENTARY 
LUNCH 



Feb. 1-5 

Men: pizza, fruit juice, 
chocolate chip cookies, 
milk. 

Tues: Early release 
day. No lunch served. 

Wed: grilled hot dog on 
a roll, vegetarian beans, 
frait cup, milk. 

Thurs: spaghetti and 
meatballs, vegetable, fresh 
baked Italian roll, jello, 
milk. 

Fri: grilled cheese 
sandwich, tater tots, fruit 
juice, milk. 



for out-of-date directories," 
said John Balaguer, 
director of Environmental 
Issues for NYNEX. "As 
new markets are found, 
NYNEX forms public- 
private partnerships with 
local recycling officials to 
create a long-term, 
sustainable effort to 
collect and recycle 
telephone directories in 
their community recycUng 
programs." 

Delivery of the Boston 
directories to area homes 
and businesses will be 
completed March 9. 



SECONDARY 
LUNCH 



Feb. 1-5 

Men: pizza, green 
beans, apple crisp, milk. 

Tues: hamburger on a 
roll, cole slaw or salad, 
fruit juice, jello, milk. 

Wed: American chop 
suey, vegetable, fruit 
juice, fresh baked wheat 
roll, milk. 

Thurs: barbecue 
chicken, sweet potato, 
vegetable, fresh baked 
wheat roll, jello, milk. 

Fri: grilled cheese 
sandwich, tater tots, fruit 
juice, milk. 



Medically 
Speaking 



by Michael M. Bakemtan, M.D., FA.C.C. 




WHAT CAN 

When visiting someone 

with a serious health 
problem , it is natural to feel 
uncomfortable. What 
should you say - or leave 
unsaid? Most patients truly 
appreciate visits from 
friends and family, which 
can even help them toler- 
ate great pain because they 
know others will be there to 
stand by them. Follow the 
patient's lead on what to 
discuss. After offering the 
initial "How are you feeling," 
let the patient air pent-up 
anger or gukJe the conver- 
sation away from the situa- 
tion at hand. Most will drop 
clues about the type of visK 
they would like. Beyond 
that, be honest about your 
own feelings. If you are 
scared, say so. Your great- 
est gift b your presence 
arxi genirine concem. 
P.S. Check with friends. 



YOU SAY? 

family or medical person- 
nel to see if a visit would 
be appropriate, and don't 
stay too long when you do 
visit. 

Before bringing your 
children along on such a 
visit, if s a good idea to sit 
down with them both to 
address their questions 
and concerns and to out- 
line for them some guide- 
lines for appropriate bed- 
side behavior. For more 
information on this topic or 
on the prevention and 
treatment of heart disease, 
call COMPREHENSIVE 
CARDIAC CARE at 472- 
2550. We focus on treat- 
ing the patient, rather than 
the disease. Office hours 
are by appointment at 1 01 
Adams St., Suite 24, in 
Quincy. I am affiliated with 
Quincy Hospital and South 
Shore Hospitals. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Let College Fly On Own 




sncE 



Quincy College, you might say, is a little like the kid 
that outgrew his britches. 

Everyone could see him growing but didn't think or do 
much about it until suddenly one day — oops — it was 
quite obvious he was too big for them. 

And now, it seems quite obvious that Quincy College, 
one of the fastest growing colleges in the state, is in need 
of a better governing fit. 

The newly created Quincy College Governance 
Committee, headed by School Commit- 
teewoman Linda Slice as chairman, is 
off to a good start looking for that right 
fit. 

The college is presently — and has 
been since it opened 35 years ago — 
governed by the School Committee and 
the superintendent of schools. 

Its president is more like a high school principal than 
a college president. The president answers to the school 
superintendant and the School Committee. 

That's the way it was set up when the college was in its 
infancy and it worked fine then and for a nimiber of years. 

But critics feel the college has outgrown this govern- 
ing system and that a needed change is long overdue. 

Looking at a few figures would seem to strengthen this 
argimfient. 

In 1958, the college opened with a total enrollment of 
35 students. 

The first commencement class had something like six 
or nine graduates. 

Today, the college has 3,688 students — 3,298 in 
Quincy and 390 at the new Plymouth campus. 

Last year's graduating class numbered 534. 

Times certainly have changed since 1958. 

The college, many feel, should have its own governing 
board and the School Conmiittee and superintendant of 
schools should concentrate on the elementary, middle and 
high schools. 

The college, and the schools, would be better off, and 
better places of learning. 

It would give the superintendant of schools more time 
to supervise the schools and the School Conmiittee more 
time to oversee the quaUty of education. 

The college president, under one proposal, would 
report to a new Board of Trustees instead of to the school 
superintendant and School Committee. 

How that board would be selected and what the future 
relationship between the college and the city are questions 



the committee is seeking answers for. 

Another matter is determining the status of the Quincy 
College teachers who are municipal employees and 
members of the Quincy Education Association — the same 
union to which the public schools teachers belong. 

It looks like a well-rounded committee with a variety 
of input. In addition to Slice, the members include in 
alphabetical order: 

Sean Chishohn, Quincy College Student Government; 
Councillor Larry Chretien, School Supl. Eugene Creedon, 
School Committee Vice Chairman Steve Durkin, Coun- 
cillor Tom Fabrizio, Quincy College President Clayton 
Johnson, Bemice Mader, administrative assistant to Mayor 
James Sheets; City Solicitor Steve McGrath, Sheila 
Mclntyre, representing College Courses, Inc. which help 
found and helps to finance the college; Charles Sweeny, 
former School Conunitteeman and a member of the 
college's President Board of Trustees that serves in an 
advisory capacity and Thomas Walsh, president of the 
Quincy Education Association. 

The Governance Committee hopes to make its final 
reconunendations to Mayor Sheets and the City Council 
by April 1. 

There may not be complete agreement among the 
conmiittee members as to what to do and how to do it. 

Hilt we hope the final recommendations — ^whether 
they are imanimous or not — are given full consideration 
and, hopefully, implementation. 

Quincy College is not a high school. It is a fast growing 
college and should be treated and nm like one. 

It should come out from under the wings of the School 
Committee and superintendant of schools and allowed to 
fly on its own. 

It's not a kid anymore. 

□ 

QUINCY WAS WELL represented at President 
Clinton's inaugural and at the various balls and other 
whirl of social activities in Washington. 

The Quincy group included: 

Mayor James Sheets, Senator Michael Morrissey, City 
Council President Charles Phelan, Councillors Bmce 
Ayers and Ted DeCristofaro, School Committeeman Ron 
Mariano, Fr. Jack Ahem of St. Ann's Church and Bill 
O'Connell, Morrissey 's campaign manager who worked 
with the inaugural committee. 

Sheets got invited to a party at Senator Edward 
Kennedy ' s home . Ayers got a chance to see Kim Basinger 
in person at a restaurant. 



Reader's Forum 



Needs Help In Locating 
Robert F. Huson 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

I need the help of your 
newspaper to locate a 
resident of the Quincy 
general area who served 
with honor in World War 

n. 

Specifically, I am 
trying to locate Robert F. 
Huson who fought for his 
country in Belgium and 
Germany during the 
"Battle of the Bulge" and 
beyond. He served in the 
U.S. Army, Battery "C" 
924th Field Artillery 
Battalion, 99th Infantry 
Division. 

Robert F. Huson 's last 
known address is 234 
Norfolk St., WoUaston, 
Massachusetts. 

Anyone with any 
information pertaining to 
Mr. Huson can contact 
William "Frank" Kyser, 
3226 Cawein Way, 



Louisville, KY. 40220- 
1934, phone (502) 458- 
5931. 

Any help in locating 

this Massachusetts native 

will be deeply appreciated. 

William F. Kyser 

3226 Cawein Way 

Louisville, KY 40220- 

1934 

P.S. The Great State of 
Massachusetts should be 
very proud of her sons, like 
Robert, who served and 
fought with the 99th 
Infantry Division who 
made history in the 
"Battle of the Bulge." 
Also, all veterans, no 
matter what outfit, who 
fought in that ungodly 
battle of 1944-45 should 
never have to worry about 
not going to heaven; they 
have already served their 
time in hell. Amea 



Pleased That Fountain 
Will Remain At Cemetery 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
I was pleased to note in 
The Quincy Sun. Nov. 25, 
that Mayor James Sheets 
has decided that the 
granite fountain will 
remain at the WoUaston 
Cemetery. 

At the time when I 
came to Quincy in 1903, 
the fountain at Quincy 
Square performed a very 
useful service. There were 
no automobiles and the 
only public fountain for the 
horses was at Quincy 
Square. The design 
included one side for 
horses and the opposite 
side of the fountain for the 
public, with a cast iron 
cup chained to the basin. It 
never had a water spray. 
The location at the 
WoUaston Cemetery 
blends with the granite 



memorials by skilled 
granite cutters of the times 
gone by. 

The sculpture will be 
moved to a new location 
not yet decided for the 
safety of the children. A 
good location would be at 
the entrance to the Pine 
Hill Cemetery from 
Willard Street, which 
would be a peaceful 
location. Quincy was once 
known as the Granite City. 
The entrance to the 
cemetery from Willard 
Street needs an up-to-date. 

The sculpture is a 
product of granite from 
Ward 4 and will serve as a 
symbol for the granite 
quarries and the works of 
the past. 

Alfiied Benedetti 
Rodman St. 



Third 'Welcome To Quincy' 
Sign Installed By Partnership 



Thursday, January 28, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 5 



The Quincy Partnership 
has installed the third 
hand-crafted "Welcome 
To Quincy" sign near the 
President's Golf Course on 
West Squantum St. at the 
Quincy-Milton line. 

The Partnership also 
has placed a new sign near 
the Cathay Pacific 
restaurant at the entrance 
to Quincy from the 
Neponset Bridge. The state 
had previously installed a 
similar sign at the rotary 
located on the Quincy side 
of the Fore River Bridge. 
Over the last several 
months, events have been 
held to help raise funds for 
the sign installations. The 
Partnership's goal is to 
raise a total of $15,000 
and install nine more signs 
at the principal entrances 
to the city. 

"The signs read, 
'Welcome To Quincy, 
1625' to mark the original 
settlement of what is now 
Quincy by Captain 
Richard WoUaston," said 
Thomas M. Galvin, 
member of The Quincy 



Partnership and a vice 
president at Bostor Gear in 
Quincy. "Hassan Sign 
Company of Cohasset has 
done a wonderful job hand- 
carving the signs into solid 
mahogany, using 23K gold 
leaf on the lettering. 
Everyone in Quincy can be 
proud to see these signs on 
display." 

Installation has been 
coordinated by Quincy 
Department of Public 
Works crews, and as the 
frozen ground thaws the 
remaining signs will begin 
to appear. 

The next Quincy 
Partnership fundraiser 
planned is a pre- 
Valentine's Day "We 
Love Quincy" dance, to be 
held Feb. 11 at The 
Atrium, Presidents Place, 
Quincy Center, from 6 to 9 
p.m. A $25 donation per 
person includes music, 
food, and a cash bar. 
Tickets can be obtained 
from Maureen Rogers at 
the South Shore Chamber 
of Commerce, 479- 1111. 




THE THIRD "Welcome To Quincy" sign funded by the 
Quincy Partnership on West Squantum St. at the Quincy- 
Milton line. Shown here are Ed Keohane, chairman, 
Quincy Partnership; Tom Koch, executive secretary to 
Mayor James Sheets; and Tom Galvin, member of the 
Quincy Partnership. 



Flood Relief Project 
Moving Ahead 



Relief is in sight for 
many residents who have 
been troubled by flooding. 

Public Works 

Commissioner David 
Colton and engineers from 
Weston & Sampson 
Engineering, Inc., 
presented plans to the City 
Council Monday for 
drainage improvement in 
the Montclair-Wollaston 
and Squantum-Houghs 
Neck areas. 

Preliminary design work 
has been completed to 
correct flooding and 
drainage problems in 
sections of WoUaston and 
Montclair and work will 
begin in October and is 
scheduled for completion 
in October of 1994, 



The project will focus 
on four major areas, 
Elmwood Ave. and 
Harvard St.; Brook and 
Belmont St.'s and Newport 
and Wilson Ave.'s; 
Farrington St. from 
Holbrook Road to Wilson 
Ave.; and Eddie and Hilda 
St.'s near Adams St. 

Other areas which will 
also be addressed are 
Weston and Wayland St.'s; 
Marlboro St. between Elm 
and Waterston Ave.'s; 
Burgess St.; and Harriet 
Ave. 

Work will include 
installation and-or 
replacement of additional 
drain pipes, larger pipes, 
pumping stations, 
tidegates and catch basins. 



Television testing will also 
be done in some areas to 
search for pipe defects. 

Estimated cost of the 
project is between $1.6 
and $1.8 million. 

In Squantum, a new 
seawall will be built along 
East Squantum St., a 
drainpipe will be installed 
to alleviate flooding 
between houses on Heath 
and Deerfield St.'s, and 
work will be done to 
prevent flooding around 
Essex St. and other areas. 

One of two measures 
will be taken aroimd Essex 
St. A natural berm will be 
built up near the shoreline 
at the edge of the marsh or 
a dike will be constructed 
across the marsh between 
Landsdowne and Essex 



St.'s. A tidegate will also 
be installed in conjunction 
with the dike. 

If the dike is built, the 
marsh area involved would 
be removed and restored at 
the Rock Island marsh in 
Houghs Neck. The berm 
project would cost an 
estimated $350,000 while 
the dike project is 
estimated at $250,000. 

Cost of the seawall is 
estimated at $150,000. 

The permitting process 
for the dike project could 
take up to a year. 

Mayor James Sheets is 
expected to put together a 
bond proposal for the work 
before the end of the 
winter. 

"STEVE KAVANAGH 



Petition Drive Continues 
For Sewer- Water Relief 



City Councillor Peter 
Kelson has renewed his 
call for residents to protest 
skyrocketing sewer-water 
bills. 

Residents are urged to 
write letters to President 
William Clinton and 
members of Congress 
asking them for rate reUef 
by restoring the federal 
Clean Water Act which 



would help fund the 
Boston Harbor cleanup and 
pay 70 percent of residents 
sewer-water bills. 

Kolson said he has 
received many letters, all 
of which have the same 
theme, "Please help, I 
can't afford it." 

He has also begun a 
petition drive and 
collected nearly 700 



signatures in just one day. 
Kolson has distributed 
petitions to other City 
Councillors and posting 
them in businesses and 
other locations around the 
city. 

"It's going well. People 
can't wait to sign them," 
he said. "I'd like to collect 
a couple of thousand 
signatures." 



Kolson will present the 
letters and signatures to 
Mayor James Sheets next 
week and will hand deliver 
them to Congressman 
Gerry Studds' Quincy 
Center office. 

Letters may be sent to: 
City Council Office, City 
Hall, 1305 Hancock St., 
Quincy, 02169. 

"STEVE KAVANAGH 



Beechwood Center 



Thursday, Jan. 28: 
Pre-Lunch Exercise, 11:15 
a.m.; Lunch - call for 
inform ation & 

reservations, 11:45 a.m.; 
Movies, second and fourth 
Thursday of each month, 



admission 50 cents, 1 p.m.; 
Multiple Sclerosis 
Supi>ort, fourth Thursday of 
the month, 7 p.m. 

Friday, Jan. 29: 

Walking Club with Nancy 



(three miles), 9 a.m.; 
Gentle Walk, meet at 
Beechwood, 10 a.m.; 
"Easy-Does-It" dance- 
exercise with instructor 
Gini Waterman, six-week 
class began Jan. 8, $18, 



10:15-11 a.m.; Coed 
Volleyball, $2, 11:15 a.m. 
to 12:45 p.m. Line 
Dancing, $3, 1 to 2:30 p.m. 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

Mayor Delia Chiesa 
Narrowly Escapes 
Helicopter Crash 

Mayor Amelio Delia Chiesa and helicopter pilot Lt. 
Cmdr. Gerald Achin narrowly escaped a crash when their 
aircraft hit an air pocket while taking off from the roof of the 
new Supreme Market in Paridngway. 

They had just delivered the first load of milk from 
Charlestown to the store but -^^-^^— — ——......^i-. 



Jan. 28-Feb. 3 

1956 
37 Years Ago 



For information 
471-5712. 



call 



the television cameras had 
missed the original landing 
so they were asked to take off 
and land again. 

The hehcopter was a few 
feet off the roof when it ----■^-— —---—— —— 
dropped down suddenly, missing wires and trees by a few 
feet near the Granite St. entrance and narrowly missing the 
Granite Trust Building en route up. 

"For a few minutes I thought we were goners," said Delia 
Chiesa. "The pilot's face was white and mine was probably 
whiter. I don't know how we escaped. That pilot sure knows 
his business." 

$52 MILLION CONTRACT 

The U.S. Navy awarded a $52,429,000 contract to the 
Fore River Shipyard for construction of three frigates but 
General Manager Sam Wakeman said it will not mean an 
iix:rease in the 2,500-man woik force. 

However, he added, there will be no further layoffs from 
the drafting room staff, which had lost some 100 jobs in the 
past four months, since it will take a year to prepare drawings 
aixl woiking plans. 

PROM SITE QUESTIONED 

The School Committee took under advisement a request 
by the senior class at Quincy High School to hold its prom 
at Hatherly Countiy Qub in Scituate instead of the Quincy 
Masonic Temple. "The general atmosphere in the temple 
isn 't ideal for an informal affair of 400 boys and g^rls of high 
school age," said Carl Scrivener, spokesman for the Prom 
Committee. 

"We have hesitated to see the prom held outside Quincy 
at a distance of 12 miles," said School Supt. Dr. Paul 
Gossard. 

NO END TO SERVICE 

Edmund J. More, general counsel for the New Haven 
Railroad, said there are no plans to discontinue passenger 
service on the Old Colony Division despite $3.8 million in 
losses since 1947. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

WiUiam A. O'Connell, executive vice-president of the 
Quincy Chamber of Commerce, fired off a letter protesting 
a reference to Quincy as "dingy and unfashionable" in Sports 
Illustrated magazine . . . Mis. Elizabeth Chella was elected 
president of the Bethany Players at Bethany Congregational 
Church . . . Asst. Director Bemadette Boutin said conditions 
had improved so much at City Hospital that patients were no 
longer bedded down in the corridors . . . Coffee was 69 cents 
a pound at Kennedy's, 1384 Hancock St — 1,200 students 
remained in their classrooms as police and firefighters acting 
on a telephone tip, seardied Quincy Hi^ School for a bomb 
. . . Members of the Houghs Neck Congregational Church 
voted not to accept the resignation of the Rev. Peter V. Corea 
after an agreement was reached on the pastor's educational 
plans . . . The School Committee criticized City Manager 
Donald H. Blatt for his delay in seeking an appropriation 
from the City Council for a new junior high school in Noith 
Quincy on the site of O'Neil playground . . . "Artists and 
Models," starring Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Shirley 
MacLaine, Dorothy Malone, Eva Gabor and Anita Ekberg, 
was playing at the Strand ... 14 Marines, led by M/Sgt. Earl 
W. Shinn of Quincy, were on the last leg of their walk from 
Pittsfield to Copley Square, Boston, to publicize the M<Hhers 
March on PoUo . . . Ground was broken for the new Broad 
Meadows Junior High School and Contractor James S. 
Kelliher said the school may be ready for Christmas . . . 
Alfred Raymondi, president of the QuiiKy City Employees 
Association, protested the proposed closing of the laundry at 
City Hospital . . . Archbishop Richard J. Gushing anended a 
dinner at the Quincy High School cafeteria to kick off a 
$200,000 drive to build a new St Ann's School . . . Sandra 
Whitney was installed as worthy advisor of the Atlantic 
Rainbow Assembly . 



^ ] 



Page 6 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 28, 1993 




Marie's 
Kitchen 



By MARIE J. D'OLIMPIO 



^rsvnn 



John's Stuffed Apricots 



It seems that no matter where I am or 
what I am doing, the conversation 
always turns to food. 

While sitting around the breakfast 
table Sunday, my brother John (the 
ultimate cook) was talking about a 
dinner party he had recently and how he 
devised a new way to serve stuffing. 
Instead of serving the usual s^plesauce 
with the roast pork that his wife Anita 
had cooked, be served the stuffing inside 
an apricot for a more tasteful and prettier 
presentation. 

JOHN'S STUFF APRICOTS 
1 stalk of celery (cat up fine) 
1 tableqMNMi chopped onion 
a couple of tablespoons 
of cooking sherry 



1 teaspoon Bell's seasoning 
1 cup of stuffing mix (soaked) 
half cup to one cup of water 
1 jar of apricots (or canned) 
oil or margarine for the saute 
salt and pepper (if desired) 

In hot oil or margarine, saute the 
celery and onion. Add the wine, water 
and soaked stuffing mix and cook until 
blended. Then add the rest of the 
ingredients (except the apricots) and 
cook for a couple of more minutes. 

After it has cooled for a few minutes, 
fill half the apricot with the stuffing and 
then cover with another q)ricot half. It 
can be used with any kind of meat. 

This recipe serves eight persons. 



Lions Club Offering 
Wilfred Nolan Scholarship 



The Quincy Lions Club 
is accepting applications 
from high school seniors 
for the Wilfred A. Nolan 
Scholarship. 

The scholarship will be 
awarded either in a single 
amount of $1,000 or 
multiple amounts totaling 
$1,000. 

The Lions Club 
Scholarship Committee 



will determine the 
recipient based on the 
following criteria: 

•Active community 
interest and a 
demonstrated desire to 
assist others, particularly 
the disadvantaged. 

•Academic ability. 
Visually impaired and-or 
learning disabled students 
will be shown special 



Tamilies First' Parenting Series 
Begins Feb. 25 At Quincy Hospital 



Families First will 
present a three-part parent 
education seminar, "Love 
and Anger," Thursdays, 
Feb. 25. March 4 and 11. 
from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at 
Quincy Hospital, 114 
WMtwell St 

The seminar will 
discuss anger and 
frustration as part of fiunily 



living. The series will 
explore how parents and 
children can deal with 
angry feelings in 
constructive and non- 
hurtfiil ways. 

Pre-registration is 
required. Cost is $45 per 
person or $80 per couple. 
For information call 
Famihes First, 868-7687. 



consideration. 

•A letter written by the 
student expressing reasons 
for being considered for 
the scholarship. 

Letters and other 
information should be 
submitted by March 1 to 
George Smith, Jr., 
Scholarship Chairman, 
Quincy Lions Club, 16 
Anderson Road, 

WoUaston, 02170. 

Correction 

A step was 

inadvertently left out in 
the "Dell's Magic 
Breakfast" recipe in Marie 
D'Olimpio's "Marie's 
Kitchen" column in last 
week's edition of The 
Quincy Sun. 

Those following the 
recipe should note that the 
line, "Beat the eggs and 
set aside." should be 
changed to "Beat the 
eggs, add 1 1/2 cups of 
milk, and set aside." 




SNUG HARBOR SCHOOL donated wreaths to the Salvation Army. Students made the 
wreathes and brought in change which was applied to the wreaths. A total of $180 was 
donated. The student council made the presentation. Top row, from left, Principal 
Rick DeCristofaro, Elaine Lynch, Lisa Holbert, Shanei Johnson, Meredith OidHeld, 
James Cuddy, Anna Trenh, Assistant Principal Richard O'Brien. Bottom, James King, 

Nicole Palermo, KeUie Dykens and Tommy Yuen. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



Beth Israel Synagogue 
Student Breakfast Feb. 21 



The Quincy Post #193 
Jewish War Veterans will 
hold its 38th annual 
"Classmates Today- 
Neighbors Tomorrow" 
Breakfast meeting Sunday, 
Feb. 21 at 9:30 a.m. at the 
Beth Israel Synagogue, 33 
Grafton St, Quincy Point. 

Four students, selected 
by their classmates as 
exemplifying brotherhood 
in their daily activities, 
will be recognized: 
Heather Alison Powell of 



Quincy High; Heather 
Rendle, North Quincy 
High; Randall Dana Katz, 
Hull High; and Jessica E. 
Kilby, Weymouth Hi^. 

Citations will be 
presented to the student 
honorees by local officials, 
leaders of local veterans' 
organizations and officers 
of the Quincy Post. 

Harvey Solomon, past 
commander of die Quincy 
Post #193 JWV and 
chairman of the 



Brotherhood Program, said 
the success of the program 
has been achieved and 
sustained with the support 
of the commimity. 



Serving on the 
committee are 

Commander Bertrand 
Shaffer, past commanders 
Dave Freedman, Irving 
Isaacson and Dave 
Minkofsky, and comrades 
Paul Bailey and Herb 
Fontaine. 



Senior Cribbage Club Elects 
Officers, Seeks Members 



The Quincy Senior 
Cribbage Club recently 
elected Irving Isaacson 
president for 1993. 

Other officers elected 
were: 

Russell Sweeney, vice 
president; Ed Fisher, 



treasurer; Jim McGregor, 
card man; and Hazel 
Dockendorff, sunshine 
lady. 

Club members member 
Tuesdays at the River Bay 
Club, Brackett St., 
Quincy, from noon to 3 



p.m. They are seeking 
new members who are 
over 60 years of age and 
enjoy cribbage. 

To join or for more 
information, call Isaacson 
at 773-6199. 



Open House Feb. 5 At St. Mary's School 



St. Mary's School, 121 
Crescent St., will hold an 
Open House Friday, Feb. 




RECEPTION HALLS 



1120- 



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ThcMDtt'sout 

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has baoomc one of Boston's 
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extensive merm at affordable | 
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VW^ bke to make yournext 
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AME-LIAS 



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MUSIC 



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FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Art Perry, His Saxophone 

and Orchestra 

Featuring 

Music of the 30s and 40s 

843-7878 



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Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



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PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography 

679 Hancock Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6688 



Quincy 

Choral Society 

Ctiamber Chorus 

479-2061 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



^- refrestunents and a chance 

A 9 a.m. Catholic 

Schools Week liturgy will to visit the school's 

be followed by classrooms. 



Our Policy On 

Engagement Photographs 

And Wedding Announcements 



t^e S^ wiU itlsD<»Hi{u»xe to ttse la "(Midd^ 



JEWELRY 



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30 On Honor Roll 
At St. Ann's School 



St. Ann's School in 
Wollaston lists 30 students 
on the first term honor roll. 

They are: 

Grade 6 

Honors With 

Distinction: Tiffany 
Archambault, Kim 
Lockhead, Kelly 

Lockhead, Maggie 
McPartlin. 

Honors: Paul Bergonzi, 
Henry Chao, Kate 
Gaughan, Paul Hession, 
Patrick Mannion, Matthew 
O'Mahoney, Teddy 
Phillips, Mary Sullivan, 
Ricky Walsh. 



Grade 7 

Honors With 

Distinction: Mary Trayers, 
Kristen Walsh, Jacqueline 
Wong. 

Honors: John Aiello, 
Greg Cook, Lance 
Morganelli, Jason 
Newhall, Cindy Wong. 
Grade 8 

Honors With 

Distinction: Matthew 
Foley, Fernando Vieira. 

Honors: Jamie Breslin, 
Chrissy Fasoli, Kerry 
Ginty, Mike Trayers, Kerri 
Kelly, Michelle Owens, 
Katie Zuffante. 



Woodward School 
Las Vegas Night Feb. 6 



The Parents' Club of 
The Woodward School in 
Quincy will sponsor a Las 
Vegas Night Saturday, 
Feb. 6 from 7 p.m. to 
midnight at the school, 
1102 Hancock St. 

Admission is $2, seniors 



$1, and a cash bar will be 
available. 

All proceeds from this 
event go to benefit the 
scholarship fund for 
students currently 
attending The Woodward 
School. 




Thursday, January 28, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 7 

QCA Officers Nominated 
For Re-EIection 



The annual meeting and 
election of officers of the 
Quincy Citizens 

Association was scheduled 
to be held last night 
(Wednesday) at the 
Atlantic Neighborhood 
Center. 

The five 1992 QCA 
officers-President Arthur 
Chandler, 1st Vice 
President Donald 
MacLeod, 2nd Vice 
President John Keenan, 
Secretary Dorothy Kelly 
and Treasurer John Digilio- 
-all were nominated for re- 
election. 

During 1992 the QCA 



awarded two $200 
scholarships to June 
graduates of North Quincy 
High School, and 
supported local charities 
through donations and gifts 
of food provided by 
members. 

In 1993 the QCA plans 
to purchase a $2,500 street 
lamp to confirm the 
association's cooperation 
in the Quincy Center 
revitalization program. The 
lamp will be inscribed as a 
"Gift from the Members of 
the Quincy Citizens 
Association." 



47 Residents On 
Suffolk Dean's List 



Karen Golden Earns 
Master's Degree 



Karen Golden of 
Squantum recently 
completed requirements 
for a master's degree in 
Technical and Professional 
Writing at Northeastern 
University, Boston. 

She will receive her 
diploma during 

commencement 
ceremonies in June. 



Golden is a graduate of 
North Quincy High School 
and Boston College and is 
employed as a procedures 
editor at Massachusetts 

Financial Services 
Company, Boston. She is 
the daughter of Donald and 
Kathleen Golden of 110 
Bellevue Road. 



SALVATORE GENTILE JR. and LINDA KEEFE 



(Miller Studios) 

Linda Keefe Engaged 
To Salvatore Gentile Jr. 

School, is employed by 
Diagnostic Systems, 



Mr. and Mrs. William J. 
Keefe Jr. of Braintree 
announce the engagement 
of their daughter, Linda, to 
Salvatore J. Gentile Jr. He 
is the son of Mrs. Alberta 
Gentile of Quincy and the 
late Salvatore J. Gentile. 

Miss Keefe, a 1983 
graduate of Braintree High 



PB 

IlK. 

Mr. Gentile, a 1982 
graduate of Quincy 
Vocational-Technical High 



Suffolk University lists 
47 Quincy residents on its 
Dean's List for the fall 
semester. 

They are: 

High Honors: Shelly L. 
Hansen, Cheri A. Purves, 
Annumsiata Sodano, 
Susan C. Gallagher, 
Elizabeth A. Groom, 
Michael S. Rosol. 

Honors: John J. Geaiy, 
Michael F. Alfono, 
Christine M. Cedrone, 
Susan T. Codner, Nancy J. 
Cullen, John G. Glennon, 



Women's Exercise Program 
At Fore River Clubhouse 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department will conduct 
two women's exercise 
programs at the Fore River 
Clubhouse with both 
programs held Monday, 
Wednesday and Fridays at 
8:45 or 9:45 a.m. 

Classes begin Monday, 
Feb. 1. Instnictor will be 
Linda Brink. 

Each class includes 
exercise to improve and 
strengthen flexibility, 
endurance and overall 
fitness. Adaptations to the 



MEASURABLE 
ADVERTISING! 



exercise allow each 
participant to work out at 
their own pace. 

Cost is $25 for 30 
classes and registration is 
on a first come, first serve 
basis at the Quincy 
Recreation Department, 
100 Southern Artery, from 
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. 
For more information, 
call 376-1386. 



BALLOONS & STUFF 



690 HANCOCK ST. 

WOLLASTON 

773-0690 



ASK FOR THE $29.95 
BALLOON DELIVERY 



Robyn V. Mitchell, Janet 

School, is employed by p. white, Kathleen R. 

Blue Cross & Blue Shield. Biggins, Lisa P. Capplis, 

A November wedding is Jennifer J. Frost, Kathleen 

planned. 

A A ¥>T» TkM .» ^ , Parents Of Son 

AARP Meeting Feb. 3 Stephanie and John Jan. 12 

At Pagnano Towers p^^' ^^ Hamden cir., h^, .j^, 

wirmLt' wSesTy! ^^^^^"°^ ^ ^^"^^ -^K^Ryr^t bo™ ^^^outh. ' 
Feb. 3 at 1 



T. Hogan, Shelley E. Lane, 
Amy E. Manning, Kevin 
W. Mulvey, Joseph G. 
Murphy, Adam V. Russo, 
Karen A. Hogle, Stacy A. 
Leefe, Ebba N. Legaspi, 
Jennifer A. Masters, Paula 
J. Mellyn, Sudan X. Tan, 
Cynthia H. Wilkinson, 
Michael J. Duran, Bruce T. 
Ho, Monika P. Johnson, 
Timothy P. Kane, Danielle 
L. Lewis, Shawn P. Lynch, 
Grace E. Murphy, 
Efengenia Papantoniou, 
Tuan M. Tran, Kafai Woo, 
Marie M. Ng, Patrick A. 
Owyer, Connie H. Lee, 
Yan Q. Mei, James M. 
Pollard, Leng C. Tan, Jia 
H.Zhao. 



at South Shore 



South 



at 1 p.m. at 
Pagnano Towers. 

Guest speaker Nancy 
Trsuz of the Acupuncture 
Service of Randolph will 
give a presentation at 2 
p.m. A question and 



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Seton OB/GYN Associates 

of 

St. Margaret's/ St. Elizabeth's 

announces the opening of the 

Roslindale office with 

Paul J. Hull, MD and 

Shah Naderi, MD, MPH 

New patients are now being accepted. 

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Sunday 12-5 - Closed Monday 
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Long hair slightly higher 



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Sculptured Nails $60 

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Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 28, 1993 



Arts/Entertainment 



St. Mary's School 
To Present 'Wizard Of Oz' 



St. Mary's School, 
West Quincy, will present 
"The Wizard of Oz" 
Friday at 7:30 p.m. and 
Saturday at 1 and 7:30 
p.m. 

Tickets are $5 per 
person for each 
performance. 

There will be a special 
performance for senior 
citizens today (Thursday) 
at 3:30 p.m. Cost for this 
performance is $2. 

All performances are to 
be held in Mullaritey Hall 
at St. Mary's Church, 
West Quincy. Tickets are 
available at the door or by 
calling the school at 773- 
5237. 

The production is under 
the direction of Nina 



Zakrzewski, director and 
co-producer of the Mistery 
Dujor Theater. She 
received her master's 
degree in theater 
education from Emerson 
College. 

The students 

participating in the 
program are: 

Mary Popalsky, Colleen 
Gargan, William 

Fitzpatrick, Kerry Doherty, 
Margaret Kolson, Natalie 
Dyment, Nahia Kassos, 
Greg Puricelli, Jennifer 
Campbell, Matt Flynn, 
Kate O'Donnell, Mary 
Mooter, Sbeila Halloran, 
Eileen Mawn, David 
Hastie, Katie Kelly, Mary 
Ellen DiPietro, Nancy 
Halloran, Matthew Tobin, 



Julie Kenny, 
Webber, Nicole 
Laura Clark. 



Michael 
Bandera, 



Christine Kirby, 
Jennifer Corner, Ryan 
Flynn, Paul Flynn, Rene 
Lumaghini, Jacqulen 
Moran, Matt Reggiannin, 
Kerri Ward, Christine 
Smith, Jonele Bertoini, 
Caitlin Kolson and 
Andrianna Zakrzewski. 

They are being assisted 
of a student crew 
comprised of Peter 
Godfrey, Patrick Kerfian, 
Richard Magee and Scott 
Cayon. Student directors 
are Lauren Lumaghini, 
Rita Kirby and Kerry 
Doherty. 




Beechwood Center Receives 
$3,300 M CC Grant 



The 
Cultural 



Massachusetts 
Council has 
awarded a $3,300 grant to 
Beechwood Community 
Life Center in WoUaston, 



^CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 
1/28-2/3 



SCENT OFA 
WOMAN (R) 

12:1S-3:30-7«0-1(MS 



HEXED (R) 
rat 



ASPEN 
EXTREME (PG-13) 

11:48- 2:10.4«-7:1(»-»« 
FBI fca*T ONLY 12!1»AH_ 

BODY OF 
EVIDENCE (R) 

1(M» 
FRiai8ATONLY12:18AM 



announces Sharron Beals, 
executive director of 
Beechwood. 

"We are pleased and 
proud that, in these 
difficult economic times, 
the MCC recognized the 
quality of the programs we 
offer to the community and 
chose to support our 
continuing efforts to bring 
affordable cultural 
enrichment offerings in 
Quincy," said Beals. 

The Cultural 

Enrichment Program for 
Youth (CEPY) resumes in 
1993 with a Jan. 28 3 p.m. 
performance by 

Christopher Rowlands 



entitled "Whales & 
Tales." Specifically 
geared for families with 
children ages 5-12, 
Rowlands entertains with 
songs and stories he has 
written about the sea and 
whales. 

On March 23 at 3 p.m., 
Ira Bernstein will teach 
the intergenerational 
audience members to use 
their bodies as percussion 
instnmients as be presents 
his "Clog and Percussive 
Tap Dancing." 

AU families are invited 
to participate. Admissions 
to performances range 
from $2.50 to $3. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 
Church Annual Auction Feb. 15 



SNIPER (R) 

1 2M -arts - 4d0 - 7:30 - 10«0 
F BI* SAT ONLY laaO AM 

AUVE(R) 

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FRI ft SAT ONLY 12:18 AM 



The Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church 
annual auction will be 



Fa FEW GOOD MEN (R)l 

12«-*»- 7*0 ■•*?.. 
FW* SAT ONLY 12:18 AM 



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12K)a-2:2fr4:30-7aM«8 
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NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's ■ chanct to earn 
extra money by building a 
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Telephone: 471-3100 



held Monday, Feb. 15 at 
the church, 310 Manet 
Ave. 

Viewing will start at 
5:30 p.m. The auction will 
begin at 6 p.m. 

The event is co- 
sponsored by the Mothers 
and Others Club and Boys 
Scout Troop 6. 



•WIZARD OF OZ' play wUl be presented by St. Mary's School today (Thursday) at 3:30 p.m. for 
seniors and oo Friday, Jan. 29 at 7:30 p.m^ and Saturday , Jan. 30 at 1 p.in. and 7 :30 p.in. " Wicked 

Witch of the West" Mary Mooter, right, confk-onts Dorothy(s) Colleen Gargon, left, and Mary 
Pophisky, second right, with the "Lion" NataUe Dyment, "Tin Man" Margaret Kolson and 

"Scarecrow" Kerry Doherty. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



MWRA Poster- Writing Contest 
Open To Quincy Students 



The Massachusetts 
Water Resources Authority 
announces the 11th annual 
School Contest to 
encourage student 
awareness of the ongoing 
need for water 
conservation and the 
importance of the Boston 
Harbor project. 

"This contest 

challenges students to 
express their views on two 
topics," said MWRA 
Executive Director 
Douglas MacDonald. "The 
water-conservation poster 
contest, for Grades K-8, 
and the Boston Harbor 
writing contest, for Grades 
4-12, are open to all 
students, whether or not 
they live in our 61- 
community service 



system." 

Contest rules require 
that posters be about 
specific ways people can 
save water and/or the 
importance of water in oiff 
lives. They essay contest 
topic is "Why It is 
Important to Continue 
Improving the Quality of 
Boston Harbor." 

Poster contest entrants 
will be judged in three 
categories-Grades K-3, 
Grades 4-6 and Grades 7-8. 
Writing contest entrants 
will be judged in the 
categories of Grades 4-6, 
Grades 7-8 and Grades 9- 
12. 

First prize in each 
category is a $200 savings 
bond. Second prize is a 
$100 bond, and third prize 



is a $50 bond. Honorable 
mention awards will 
recognize other 

outstanding entries. Each 
student who participates 
will receive a certificate. 
Prizes will be awarded at 
a special ceremony during 
Water Conservation Week 
in May. 

All entries must be 
received at MWRA 
headquarters in the 
Charlestown Navy Yard in 
Boston by Friday, March 
19 at 5 p.m. 

Classroom materials 
and programs on both 
topics are available free of 
charge from the MWRA, 
along with further 
information about the 
contests. Call 241-4643 for 
details. 



Quincy Choral Society Holding Rehearsals 



Quincy Choral Society 
is currently rehearsing 
Beethoven's "Missa 
Solemnis" Mondays at 8 
p.m. at East 

Congregational Church, 
610 Adams St., East 
Milton Square. 

The society is 



especially in need of first 
sopranos, tenors, and 
basses. 



For more information, 
call 696-3941. 



Quincy High School 

Students Raise $200 

For Children*s Hospital 



MUPPET CHRISTMAS 

CAROL (R) 



CHLDRENOFTHE 
CORNim 

FmaSATOM.Y1»0AM 



Bargain Matinees 

First Tliree Shows 

$3.75 

773-5700 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 773-4600 



Wed & Thurs Jan 27+28 

Jack Nicholson 

"HOFFA"(R) 

An Adult Drama 

Eve's 7:00 only 



Starts Fri Jan 29 

"A RIVER RUNS 

THROUGH rr (PG) 

An Faniily Story 

Fri & Sat 7:00 8.9:15 

Sun-Thuts 7:00 only 



Mon & Tuds Dollar Night 



ALL SEATS $3.00 





Valentine^s Bas 

Sat. Feb. 13 at 8pm 
Brandy Pete's 
267 Franklin St., Boston 
D.J. STEVE KAVANAGH 

Music for all Occasions 



Quincy High School's 
Key Club and Student 
Council recently raised 
more than $200 for charity. 

The money was donated 



to the 
Happiness 



Children's 
Foundation 



which benefits the 
Children's Hospital. 




'Music for people who take their fun seriously!" 

Call 773-4936 





uccini^^ mister SUB 



Pizza - Pasta - Subs 
Syrians - Salads 



D\ne In or Carry Out, or Delivered 



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Hot Line 328-9764 • 328-0266 FAX 786-9792 




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FOR GREAT ENTERTAINMENT - CALL 

843-5862 



Thursday, January 28, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Crime 
Watch 



By ROBERT HANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quincy Police Department 




Crime Prevention Tips 
For Senior Citizens 

Help malce your community a safer place to live and 
don't let fear of crime restrict your activities. Being 
alert to your surroundings, installing good locks on 
doors and windows, and taking common-sense 
precautions while inside and outside your home can 
reduce opportunities for crime. 

To give yourself that extra margin of security: 

•Use Direct Deposit for pension and Social Security 
checks. 

•Don't display large amounts of cash in public. 

•Be wary of talkative strangers when the 
conversation turns to money. Read every news paper 
report on con games and be ready to say no if someone 
comes to your with a get-rich scheme. 

•Travel with friends when you leave home to go 
shopping, to the bank, or doctor. 

•Get to know your neighbors and keep their phone 
numbers handy for emergencies. 

•Work out a "buddy" system with a friend to check 
on each other's welfare daily. 

•If you're along, don't advertise it. Use only your 
first initial in phone books, directories and apartment 
lobbies. 

•If you must carry a purse, hold it close to your 
body. Don't leave your wallet or purse on a counter or 
in a shopping cart unattended. 

•If you are threatened by physical force, don't resist. 
Remain calm and observe the assailant so you can 
give an accurate description to the police. 

•Organize or join a Neighborhood Watch program or 
a Window Watch program to keep an eye out for 
unusual activity in your neighborhood or complex. A 
neighboihood where people are active and involved is 
always a safer, better place to live. 




Cafe Lazzarino 




Tedetchi food Shop 




Hancock News 



li , ■■"• ( 1 



1 



i 




G.]. Coddington'i 
Resfourant 



^m 



t\\ 1250 Hancock 



Downlown Quincy 



Roberf Lyons 
Hair Solon 

[X 







Presidcnliol Dry 
Cleaners 




Horvord Community 
Heolth Plan 
Optical Shop 




Buck-A-Book 





U.5. SAVINGS BONDS 



Police Log Hot Spots 



Monday, Jan. 18 
Break, 6:10 a.m. 451 Quincy Ave. Macissa Oil Co. 
Under investigation. 

Break, 9:47 a.m. 500 Congress St. Office broken into. 
Break, 4:43 p.m. 23 Bryant Ave. Under investigation. 

Tuesday, Jan. 19 
Break, 3:36 p.m. 114 Whitwell St., Quincy Hospital. 
A number of syringes stolen from an office. 
Armed Robbery, 8:48 p.m. 1511 Hancock St. CaUer 
reports that several subjects approached him with a 
knife and took his Notre Dame jacket. Suspects may 
have been operating a gray hatchback car. 

Wednesday, Jan. 20 
Break, 12:07 p.m. 110 Edwin St. Under investigation. 
Unarmed robbery, 7:50 p.m. 71A Station St. Victim 
reports subjects approached her and took her purse. 

Thursday, Jan. 21 
Attempted Larceny, 3:27 p.m. 1000 Southern Artery. 
Victim received a call from Georgia, that she had won 
$10,000 in a contest She was to send a check for $262 
to the contest company to pay for taxes and expenses 
on winnings. Under investigation by Q.P.D. and 
Georgia State Police. 

Break, 9:53 p.m. 155 Billings Rd. Several bicycles 
were stolen. 



Friday, Jan. 22 
Armed Robbery, 6:49 p.m. 263 Beale St., Dairy 
Mart Two males wearing sld masks and black jackets, 
about six feet tall. A knife was shown. Suspects fled 
on foot down Everett St 

Break, 10:19 a.m. 449 Sea St. Apartment broken 
into. 

Saturday, Jan. 23 
Break, 5:52 p.m. 80 Staodish Ave. Under 
investigation. 

Sunday, Jan. 24 
Attempted Break, 4:29 a.m. 62 Granite St. Burger 
King. Window at drive-up was smashed, no entrance 
gained. 

Break, 8:35 p.m. 148 Kemper St Under 
investigation. 

Break, 9:33 p.m. 45 School St Apartment break. 
Break, 10:33 p.m. 24 Orchard St. Under 
investigation. 
Break, 10:44 p.m. 195 Pine St. Under investigation. 

Services for the Week 
Total CaUs: 979; Stolen Cars: 8; Arrests, 59. 
If you have any information on any of the above 
crimes, or any crime, please contact the Quincy Police 
Detective Bureau at 479-1212 ext. 312. You will not 
be required to identify yourself, but it could help. 



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1988 BUICK CENTURY 

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"A reliable sedan. " 

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1989 MERCURY MARQUIS 

Full size wgn., full pwr., V8, 

wtiite, dean. 

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1985 OLOS CIERA WGN. 

V6. air cond., low, low mi., 

very clean. 

#8-244 


1988 OLDS DELTA 88 

4 dr. sdn., full pwr., full size, 

full comfort. 

#11-340 


1989 BUICK REGAL 

2 dr. hard top, p. windows & 

locks, am/fm cass. Sporty 

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1986 BUICK REGAL LTD. 

2dr. cpe.,V8, fullpwr.. 

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1988 BUICK REGAL CPE. 

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1985 CHEVROLET CELEBRITY 

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air cond. very low mileage 

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Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 28, 1993 



Obituaries 



Mary F. Corbeil, 80 

Former Hairdresser 



A funeral Mass for 
Mary Frances (Peters) 
Corbeil, 80, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Jan. 22 in 
St. Joseph's Church. 

Mrs. Corbeil died Jan. 
18 in the John Adams 
Nursing Home after a brief 
illness. 

A former hairdresser, 
she worked at the former 
Bobbie's Hair Styling 
Salon in Quincy and for 
her late husband, 
Lawrence J. Corbeil, at his 
salon, Larry's Hair Styling 
of Quincy, before retiring 
many years ago. 

Born and educated in 
Dover, N.H., she also 
attended school in 
Norwood. She moved to 
Quincy 40 years ago. 



She is survived by two 
sons, Larry J. Corbeil of 
Braintree and Robert F. 
Corbeil of Florida; a sister, 
Sarah Kathleen Shea of 
Brockton; and her late 
husband's mother, Marie 
M. (Dionne) Corbeil of 
Quincy. 

Burial was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney' 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the John Adams Nursing 
Home, 211 Franklin St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 or to 
St. Joseph's Church, 556 
Washington St., Quincy, 
MA 02169. 



Mary G. Martin, 94 

Retired Quincy School Teacher 



A funeral Mass for 
Mary G. Martin, 94, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Monday at St. Mary's 
Church. 

Miss Martin died Jan. 
21 at the Quincy Nursing 
Home. 

A, retired Quincy school 
teacher, she taugt^ at the 
C o d d i n g t o n '''it o d 
JMeifyMouftt Scbacrts»fo# 
ijiany years. 

Bom in Quincy, she 
graduated from the 
Woodward School in 191S 
and the Bridgewater 
Normal School in 1918. 

She was a member of 
the Association of 
National Retired Teachers, 
and an honorary member 



of the Quincy Chapter of 
the Massachusetts Retired 
Teachers Association. 

Daughter of the late 
Katie (Earl) Martin and 
Michael J. Martin, she is 
survived by a niece, Carol 
Scavuzzo of Quincy; and 
two nephews. Early Martin 
and Jolm M. Martin, both 
of California. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 326 
Copeland St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Scholarship Fund of 
Quincy Retired Teachers 
Association or to the 
charity of one's choice. 



Irene McHugh, 88 



A funeral Mass for Irene 
(Charron) McHugh, 88, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 21 in Star of the Sea 
Churdi. 

Mrs. McHugh died Jan. 
19 at New England 



R.E. PAPILE CO. 

1546Hancocr\S! .Qjpcy 

MemoPcil G"s Perpftua's 

P^aquf■^ Engraving, Prayer Ca'ds 

L> ; uS assis! ycu en all ycur 

mesponai reeds. 



Deaconess Hospital in 
Boston. 

She was born in 
Worcester. 

Wife of the late 
Thomas J. McHugh, she is 
survived by many nieces 
and nephews. 

Burial was in Old 
Calvary Cemetery, Boston. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



Margaret J. Willey, 67 

Worked At Manufacturing Co. 




SCOTT DEWARE 



A THOUGHT 
FOR THE WEEK 

Abraham Lincoln one* said 
that people are about as happy In 
this world as they maks up their 
minds to be. Plant that seed in 
your mind and give it every op- 
portunity to grow and bear fruit. 
It is only human to feel discouraged at times, but you 
should never thinic of ghring up - in many cases tiw low 
moment is tlie beginning of better things. 

Here are a few rules for getting out of a depressed state 
of mind: Nsvsr make an Important decision when you eare 
mentally low ebb. Deckle upon policies when you are In 
normal state of mind, never when you are feeling low. 

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Because you liave occasional spells of despondency, 
don't despair. The sun has a sinking spell every night, but 
H rises again ail right the rwxt morning... 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the "New England Funeral Trust' 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered to Any Distance 



Margaret J. Willey, 67, 
of Bonita Springs, Fla., 
fonnerly of Quincy, died 
Jan. 16 at Naples 
Community Hospital in 
Florida after a brief illness. 

She worked at De-Cha 
Manufacturing in Quincy 
for 22 years. 

She was past 
commodore of the Norfolk 
Yacht Club and a member 
of the New England 
Commodores. 

Born in Quincy, she 
lived there all her life until 
moving to Florida two 
years ago. She was a 



graduate of North Quincy 
High School. 

She was a member of 
the Quincy Veterans of 
Foreign Wars Auxiliary. 

She is survived by two 
daughters. Donna M. 
Kenway of Boston and 
Karen L. Kessler of 
California; a brother, 
Charles W. Hopkins of 
Wollaston; a sister, Ruth 
McLaughlin of Braintree; 
and two grandchildren. 

Burial was private. 

Arrangements were by 
the Lydon Funeral Home, 
644 Hancock St. 



Eugene F. Gurhey 



A memorial service for 
Eugene F. Gurhey of 
Quincy was held Jan. 21 in 
the Deware Funeral Home, 
576 Hancock St. 

Mr. Gurhey died Jan. 17. 



,iiiiir*iiiitii 



American Heart 
Association 



He was a Navy veteran 
of World War II. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Barbara M. (Hobson) 
Gurhey; two daughters, 
Judith A. Dunn of Quincy 
and Diana G. Smith of 
Scituate; and four 
grandchildren. 

Donations may be made 
to Parkinson's Foundation, 
360 W. Superior St., 
Chicago, IL 60610. 



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Mildred B. Harrison, 94 

Former Guidance And Research Director, 
Teacher For Quincy Public Schools 



A memorial service for 
Mildred B. (Bartlett) 
Harrison, 94, of Quincy, 
director of guidance and 
research for Quincy Public 
Schools for 29 years, was 
held yesterday 

(Wednesday) in United 
First Parish Church. 

Mrs. Harrison died Jan. 
22 at the Carney Hospital 
in Dorchester. 

She began her career as 
a high school English 
teacher in Bath, Me., and 
was dean of girls at 
Watertown High School 
where she was an advisor 
to many girls' groups aiKl 
school organizations. 

She later joined Quincy 
schools as dean of girls 
and set up a system-wide 
program which became a 
temporary guidance 
department in 1934. The 
department was made 
permanent the following 
year. 

The guidance 

department was 

subsequently involved in 
prevention of delinquency, 
in providing information on 
the schools to the 



community aiKl conducting 
in-service teacher training. 

Bom in Boston, she 
lived in Quincy for 91 
years. 

A 1920 graduate of 
Wellesley College, she 
received a master's degree 
from George Washington 
University and a master of 
arts degree from Boston 
University. 

She was a member of 
the Quincy Retired 
Teachers' Association, the 
Quincy Historical Society, 
the Massachusetts Society 
of Mayflower Descendants 

and the Wellesley College 
Qub. 

She is survived by two 
cousins, Frances Jewell of 
Rochester, N.H., and 
Parker Harrison Jr. of 
Acton; and her friends, 
Thomas and Mona 
Flaherty of Kingston. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Hamel, 
Wickens and Troupe 
Funeral Home, 26 Adams 
St. 



Hilda E. Lombard, 100 



A funeral service for 
Hilda E. (Peterson) 
Lombard, 100, of Quincy, 
was held Jan. 20 in the 
Keohane Funeral Home, 
785 Hancock St. 

Mrs. Lombard died Jan. 
16 in a South Yarmouth 
nursing home after a brief 
illness. 

She was bom in Iowa. 



Wife of the late Frank 
Lombard and mother of the 
late Ernest Lombard, she 
is survived by a daughter- 
in-law, Josephine Lombard 
of Somerville; a nephew 
and niece, Henry Wiley of 
Quincy and Ruth Jacques 
of Hyannis; and a 
grandniece. 

Burial was private. 



Emma R. Tonello, 85 



A funeral Mass for 
Emma R. (Rigo) Tonello, 
85, of Quincy, formerly of 
Halifax and Fitchburg, was 
celebrated Jan. 23 in St. 
John the Baptist Church. 

Mrs. Tonello died Jan. 
19 at Quipcy Hospital after 
a brief ilbess. 

She was a member of 
the Mother Cabrini Club 
and the Quincy Senior 
Citizens Drop-In Center. 

Bora and educated in 
Italy, she lived in Quincy 
for 63 years. 

A United Way 

^^^^ II brings out the best in it of us. 



Wife of the late 
Dominick Tonello, she is 
survived by a son, Joseph 
V. Tonello of Quincy; two 
sisters, Marcellina 
Bizzozero of Whitman and 
Lena Lyons of Florida; two 
grandchildren, and three 
great-grandchildren. She 
was the mother of the late 
Edward Tonello. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to St. John the Baprist 
Church, 21 Gay St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 



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HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY. MASS. 

472-6344 



Armando P. DiSalvio, 71 

Retired Shipyard Storehouse Worker 



A funeral Mass for 
Annando P. DiSalvio, 71, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 23 in St. John the 
B2q)tist Church. 

Mr. DiSalvio died Jan. 
20 at Quincy Hospital. 

A storehouse worker for 
Bethlehem Steel and 
General Dynamics at the 
Fore River shipyard for 40 
years, he retired six years 
ago. 

He was an Army Air 
Corps veteran of World 
Warn. 

Bom and educated in 
Quincy, he was a lifelong 
resident. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Frances B. (France) 
DiSalvio; two sons, Philip 
S. DiSalvio of Basking 



Ridge , N.J. and Frank 
DiSalvio of Holliston; a 
daughter. Donna M. Klein 
of Norton; two brothers, 
Arthur DiSalvio and 
Richard J. DiSalvio, both 
of Quincy; two sisters, 
Anna Cuzzupe of 
Lexington and Mary 
DiRocco of Hingham; and 
five grandchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Cancer 
Society, 294 Pleasant St., 
Stoughton, MA 02072. 



Hildur C. Palmer, 95 

Retired Chief Clerk For Draft 
Boards; Soprano Soloist 

A funeral service for for 24 years before retiring 



Hildur C. (Johnson) 
Sipprelle Palmer, 95, of 
South Yarmouth, formerly 
of Quincy, was held Jan. 
21 in Covenant 
Congregational Church. 

Mrs. Palmer died Jan. 
16 at Winsor Nursing 
Home in South Yarmouth 
after a brief illness. 

She was a retired chief 
clerk for the draft boards in 
Weymouth and Braintree. 

She was a life member 
and past worthy matron of 
the Quincy Chapter, Order 
of Eastern Star, and past 
worthy high priestess of 
the Bethany White Shrine. 
She was a member of the 
Order of Vassa for 66 
years. 

Well-known as a 
soprano soloist in Quincy 
and Braintree, she sang at 
the former Swedish 
Covenant Congregational 
Church on Garfield St. in 
Quincy and often dressed 
in costume to sing 
Swedish arts songs at 
various Masonic functions. 

She worked for the 
Selective Service System 



in 1964. 

Bom in Muscadine, 
Ala., she lived in 
Concordia, Kan. before 
moving to Quincy in 1915. 
She was a graduate of 
Hickox Secretarial School, 
Boston. 

She lived 1000 
Southern Artery in Quincy 
and at Newfield House in 
Plymouth before moving to 
South Yarmouth a year 
ago. 

Wife of the late U. 
Perry Siprelle and Leo 
Palmer, she is survived by 
a brother. Royal Johnson 
of Brockton; a sister, 
Violet I. Johnson of West 
Yarmouth; and a niece, 
Doris Johnson of Kingston. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Hamel, 
Wickens and Troupe 
Funeral Home, 26 Adams 
St. 

Donations may be made 
to the organ fund of 
Covenant Congregational 
Church. 



Patricia A. Watt, 41 



A graveside service for 
Patricia Arm Watt, 41, of 
Quincy, will be held today 
(Thursday) at 1 p.m. in 
Cedar Grove Cemetery, 
Dorchester. 

She died Jan. 23. 

She is survived by a 
son, Richard A. Watt of 
Derry, N.H.; her mother, 
Helena Phyllis (Small) 
Watt of Derry, N.H.; and a 



brother, David W. Watt of 
Derry, N.H. She was the 
daughter of the late 
Watt, 
arrangements 
the Deware 
Home, 576 



William L 
Funeral 
were by 
Funeral 
Hancock St. 



Donations may be made 
to the charity of one's 
choice. 



John L. Ward 



A funeral Mass for John 
L. Ward of Quincy was 
celebratec. yesterday 
(Wednesday) in St. Mary's 
Church. 

Mr. Ward died Monday. 

He was a veteran of 
World War II. 

Husband of the late 
Dorothy M. (Petitti) Ward, 
he is survived by a 



daughter, Diane Brooks of 
Quincy; a brother, 
Nicholas Ward of 
Weymouth; and three 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Hall 
Cemetery. 

Funeral 
were by 
Funeral 



arrangements 
the Sweeney 
Home, 326 



Copeland St. 




UnibedVt^y 

of Massachusetts Bay 



Hugh J. Gilligan Jr., 50 

Drowning Victim; Conway Amtrak 
Sheet Metal Worker For 20 Years 



Thursday, January 28, 1993 Quiocy Sun Page II 

^Beatitude Reversal' Topic 
At Point Congregational 



A funeral Mass for 
Hugh Joseph "Chic" 
GiUigan Jr., 50, of Quincy, 
will be celebrated today 
(Thursday) at 10 a.m. in 
Most Blessed Sacrament 
Church. 

Mr. Gilligan, a 
drowning victim, died 
Monday at Quincy 
Hospital two hours after he 
was found in the 
Weymouth Fore River 
near the shipyard. 

He worked for Boston 
Towing and Transportation 
for two years. Previously 
he was a sheet metal 
worker for Conrail Amtrak 
for 20 years. 

Born in Boston, he 
attended St. Patrick's 
parochial school in 
Roxbury and was a 1960 



graduate of Boston 
College High School. He 
lived in Quincy for 30 
years. 

He is survived by a son, 
Sean P. Gilligan of 
Quincy; a daughter, 
Kimberly Gilligan of 
Weymouth; a grandson, 
Brian Gilligan; his parents, 
Hugh J. GilUgan Sr. and 
Margaret (Holliday) 
Gilligan of Quincy; a 
brother, Paul R. Gilligan of 
WoUaston; and a friend, 
Rita Vallerand. 

Burial will be in Pine 
Hill Cemetery. 

Visiting hours were 
scheduled for yesterday 
(Wednesday) from 2 to 4 
p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. in the 
Lydon Funeral Home, 644 
Hancock St. 



The Rev. Carol Atwood- 
Lyon, pastor, will preach 
on "Beatitude Reversal" 
at the 10 a.m. worship 
service Sunday at Quincy 
Point Congregational 
Church. Washington St. 
and Southern Artery. 

The Rev. Fred Atwood- 
Lyon, pastor, will serve as 
liturgist. Acolytes will be 
Jason McAuliffe and Tom 
Mclnnis, members of the 
1993 Confirmation class. 
Music will be provided by 
Dr. Herman Weiss, church 
organist and choir director. 



and the Chancel Choir. 

Church School classes 
are provided Sundays at 10 
a.m. Parents desiring to 
register their children in 
the Church School should 
ask for Debbie Tait, 
superintendent, on Sunday 
mornings or call one of the 
pastors at 773-6424. 

For more information 
about church services and 
activities, call the church 
office at 773-6424, 
Mondays through Fridays 
between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. 



Ministries Fair Jan. 31 
At St. Chrysostom's 



Robert J. Goode Sr., 79 

Milk Deliveryman For 30 Years 



St. Chrysostom Church, 
Hancock and Linden St.'s, 
Wollaston, will hold a 
Ministries Fair following 
the 10 a.m. service 



Sunday, Jan. 31. 

The fair will showcase 
the various activities at St. 
Chrysostom's. For infor- 
mation call 472-0737. 



A funeral Mass for 
Robert J. Goode Sr., 79, of 
Honolulu, Hawaii, 
formerly of Quincy, vvdll be 
celebrated Friday at 10 
a.m. in St. Francis Xarier 
Church, Hyannis. 

Mr. Goode died 
yesterday (Wednesday) at 
the home of his son, the 
Rev. Robert J. Goode Jr. of 
St. Mark's Episcopal 
Church, Honolulu. 

A milk deliveryman for 
30 years, he worked for 
White Brothers, Whitings, 
and Thatcher Farms before 

R.I.D.E. 
MBTA 
Meeting Feb. 9 

The South Shore Area 
Subcommittee of R.I.D.E.- 
MBTA will meet Tuesday, • 
Feb. 9 from 1:30 to 3:30 
p.m. at City Hall (second 
floor), 1305 Hancock St. 

All disabled and elderly 
users of the R.I.D.E. and 
MBTA system are asked 
to attend. Advance travel 
arrangements may be 
made through the South 
Shore R.I.D.E. office at 
471-7433. 



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his retirement. 

Bom in Somerville, he 
lived in Quincy for 50 
years before moving to 
Hawaii. 

He is also survived by 
his wife, Maxine 
(Hinckley) Goode; a 
daughter, Ruth M. Gifford 
of Quincy; and two 
grandsons. 

Burial will be in 
Beechwood Cemetery, 
Centerville. 

Visiting hours are 
tonight (Thursday) from 7 
to 9 p.m. in the Doane, 
Beale and Ames Funeral 
Home, Hyannis. 

Donations may be made 
to the charity of one's 
choice. 



Free Glaucoma Screening 
Friday At Eye Health Services 



In observance of 
National Glaucoma 
Awareness Week, Quincy 
Eye Health Services, 101 
Adams St., will conduct a 
free glaucoma screening to 
the public Friday, Jan. 29 
from noon to 4 p.m. 



For more information, 
call Community Relations 
Director Lisa Marie 
Sinatra at 331-3927. 

Eye Health Services is 
an ophthalmology group 
practice based in South 
Weymouth. 




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Survivors of 
Sexual Abuse 

A therapy group for women 

who were sexually abused 

For Information Call: 

Mona Barbera, Ph.D. 

547-2268 



RTR TAX SERVICE 

Call us at 479-1181, 770-1040 

We offer low prices starting at $35* 

We also offer electronic filing, 
payroll, and bookeeping service 

*1040 EZ; MASS FORM ABC ONLY. 



Quality Printing 

at a 
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We have computerized our 

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and we're expanding our 

printing division. 



We Specialize in: 
Program Books, Brochures, Newspapers, 

Newsletters, Political Flyers, Tickets, 
Stationery, Envelopes and Typesetting. 




1372 Hancock St., Quincy Square 

471-3100 



J 



Page 12 Quincy Sud Thursday, January 28, 1993 

'Getting Older' Sermon Topic 
At Bethany Congregational 



The Rev. Roger 
Ketcbam will preach on 
"The Evils and Pleasures 
Of Getting Older" at the 
10 a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Bethany 
Congregational Church, 
Quincy Center. 

Scripture reader will be 
Wendell Cosgrove. The 
musical portion of the 
service will feature the 
Chancel Choir and Ruth 
Hamilton, a prominent 
area soloist. She will sing 
two spirituals 

accompanied by Gregory 



Rynn, organist. 

Greeters will be Vivian 
Miller and Jean Ross. 
Hosting the fellowship 
hour in the Allen Parlor 
following the worship 
service will be Mildred 
Rickson and Edith 
Goodnow. 

Church School classes 
at held at 10 a.m. in the 
parish house. The Bible 
Study class will meet 
Sunday at 8:30 a.m. The 
Youth Group for students 
in Grades 7-12 will meet 
at 6:30 p.m. 



Rev. Gordon Schultz 

To Finish Interim Ministry 

At Covenant Congregational 

Sunday School, with 
classes for all ages, will 



Rev. Gordon Schultz 
will finish his interim 
ministry at Covenant 
Congregational Church, 
Whitwell and Granite Sts., 
at the 10:45 a.m. worship 
service Sunday. His 
sermon topic will be "The 
Kingdom Of God." 

The new pastor, Rev. 
LuAnn Johnson, wiU begin 
her ministry Feb. 7. 

Richard Smith, minister 
of music, will direct and 
accompany the choir in a 
choral introit and an 
anthem. Luisa Dano, 
soprano soloist, will sing. 
Smith will also play an 
organ prelude, offertory 
and postlude. 



begin at 9:30 a.m. During 
the service, an attended 
nursery is available for 
children age four and 
younger. The attendant 
will be Susan Goodale. For 
children up to age 12, 
there is junior church. 

Following the service 
there will be a potluck 
luncheon and farewell 
reception for Rev. Schultz. 
Members are asked to 
bring casseroles and salad 
or dessert. 

For more information 
about any of the church's 
activities, call the church 
office at 479-5728. 



St. Joseph's School 
1993-94 Registration Feb. 3 



St. Joseph's School in 
Quincy Point will hold 
registration for the 1993-94 
school year Wednesday, 
Feb. 3 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 
p.m. in the school library. 

Parents are asked to 



bring with them all 
immunization records, 
baptismal record, and $25 
registration fee. 

Registration is open for 
students in Grades K-8. 




^ 



Church of 
Saint John 
the Baptist 

44 School St., Quincy, MA 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Saturday 4:00 & 7:00 pm 

Sunday: 7 am, 

9 am, 11 am, 

12:30 and 5:30 pm 

Confessions in Chapel Sat. 3-3:45 pm 

\\ Rectory-21 Gay St. 773-1021 



Religion 



Parish Mission Starts 
March 7 At Sacred Heart 



Sacred Heart Parish in 
North Quincy will conduct 
a Parish Mission beginning 
Sunday evening, March 7 
and continuing through 
March 11. 

Each morning after the 



9 a.m. Mass there will be a 
reflective talk on the 
mission themes. Coffee 
and discussion will follow 
in St. Joseph's Oratory. 

For more information, 
call 328-8666. 



Guest Minister Sunday 
At United First Ftmsh 



The Rev. Bruce 
Kennedy, minister of First 
Church and Parish 
Unitarian in Dedham, will 
be the guest minister 
Sunday and lead the 10:30 
a.m. worship service at 
United First Parish 
Church, Unitarian 
Universalist, in Quincy. 

Dr. Sheldon Bennett, 
minister of the Quincy 
church, will lead worship 
in £)edham. 

Rev. Kennedy will give 
the sermon "Faith, Politics 
and the New 

Administration." 

The Church Choir, 



Norman Corey director, 
will sing. Bob Simpson 
and Matt Malloy will 
usher. 

Visitors are welcome 
and are invited to the 
social hour immediately 
following the service. 
Virginia Sindelar will be 
hostess. 

Historic First Parish 
Church, "Church of the 
Presidents," is located at 
1306 Hancock St. Church 
School and child care, 
Brenda Chin, director, are 
provided. 

Call 773-1290 
information. 



for 



'You Can Be Happy' 
United Methodist Topic 



The Rev. Harry Soper 
Jr. will preach on "You 
Can Be Happy" at the 10 
a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Quincy 
Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St. 

The Hand-Bell Choir, 
directed by Scott Walker, 
will perform. Scripture 
reader will be Kim Barr. 



Sunday School will follow 
the Young Disciples 
message. 

Ushers will be Gloria 
Tirrell and Michael 
Johnson. Hostesses at the 
fellowship hour in 
Susannah Wesley Hall 
will be Joan Honig, Maude 
Kyoperi, Marion Elkhill 
and Katherine White. 



Rev. James Kimmell 
To Preach At Faith Lutheran 



The Rev. James L. 
Kimmell will preach at the 
10 a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Faith Lutheran 
Church, 201 Granite St. 
All are welcome. 

Coffee and fellowship 



will follow. Christian 
Education for adults and 
children begins at 9 a.m. 

For more information 
call the church office at 
472-1247. 



Registration Feb. 9 
At St. Mary's School 



St. Mary's School, 121 
Crescent St., will conduct 
registration Tuesday, Feb. 



@ United W^y 

^^^ II brings oul the best in ill of us. 



ST. ANN SCHOOL 

WOLLASTON 

OPEN HOUSE— THURSDAY FEBRUARY 4 
9 A.M. — 2 P.M. 6 P.M. — 8 P.M. 
St. Ann School offers a tiigti quality private 
education at very affordable rates. 





9 at 11:45 a.m. 

Those registering 
students in Grades Pre-K 
through 8 should bring 
registration fee of $100, 
baptismal record, birth 
certificate and 

immunization records. 

For more information 
caU 773-5237. 



St. Joseph's School 

To Celebrate Catholic 

Schools Week 



St. Joseph's School in 
Quincy will celebrate 
Catholic Schools Week, 
Jan. 31 to Feb. 6, with a 
number of events. 

The week's activities 
will consist of: 

• A Faculty/Staff 
Appreciation Breakfast 
served by the Student 
Council; 

•Registration for the 
1993-94 school year Feb. 3 
from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; 

•Registration for a 



brand new Pre-K Program, 
also on Feb. 3; 

•Open House for the 
public Feb. 4 from 9:15 to 
11:15 a.m.; 

•Intramural sports 
programs; 

•A three-day Book Fair; 
and 

• A Mother-Son 
Volleyball Game Feb. 3 at 
7 p.m. 

In addition, a special 
Mass in honor of Catholic 
Schools Week will be held 
Sunday, Feb. 7 at 10 a.m. 



^Testing Ourselves' Topic 
At HN Congregational 



Dr. Peter V. Corea will 
preach on "Testing 
Ourselves" at the 10:30 
a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church. 

The choir will sing 
under the direction of 
Arden T. Schofield and an 
offertory piece will be 
sung by Dorothy Sparks, 
Christine Prendergast, and 
Gayle Mackay. Greeter 
will be Barbara Curran. 
Gloria Brummitt and Ken 
Stone will serve for the 
Diaconate. Dr. Carol Lee 
Griffin will read the 
Scripture at both the 9 and 
10:30 a.m. worship 
services. 

At the 9 a.m. service, 
the Rev. M. Alicia Corea 
will preach on "Religion: 
Theory Or Reality." 
Diaconate members 
serving will be Joan Kirby 
and Martin Gordon. 
Greeter will be Ron 
Lemieux. 

The coffee hour 
between the services will 
be hosted by Miriam 



Coombs. 

The Early Childhood 
Sunday School session for 
children ages 2 1/2 through 
Grade 1 will meet from 
8:30 to 10 a.m. The 
intermediate group will 
meet from 10 to 11:30 a.m. 
Pilgrim Fellowship, for all 
who are in Grades 7-12, 
will meet at 7 p.m. in 
fellowship hall with Ada 
and Ralph Freeman. 

The Super Bowl Take- 
Out will take place 
Sunday. Those who have 
ordered chili or corn 
chowder should pick up 
orders between 11:30 a.m. 
and 2:30 p.m. at the 
church. Orders may still be 
placed by calling Dot at 
479-6259, Alpha at 472- 
2463, or Susan at 479- 
5776. 

The church is equipped 
for the physically 
challenged. Members are 
asked to bring donations 
for the baskets in the 
vestibule for Fr. Bill's 
Place and the PSSB 
Pantry Shelf. 



St. Joseph's School To Start 
Pre-Kindergarten Program 



St. Joseph's School in 
Quincy Point will open a 
Pre-Kindergarten Program 
in September. 

The program will be 
held Mondays, 

Wednesdays, Thursdays 
and Fridays. There will be 



two sessions, one from 9 to 
11:30 a.m. and one from 
noon to 2:30 p.m. 

Registration will take 
place at the school 
Wednesday, Feb. 3 from 9 
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 



Sterling Middle School 
PTO To Meet Feb. 2 



The StcrUng PTO will 



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Availabl»-52 WEEKS A YEAR 



nil DC Holidays, Vacation $ZU UBf PaV 
UAHC Week i Non-School days. ^ ^ 



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Available for entire school 
year until 5:30. 



$450 



TUITION 



$775 In Parish, $925 out of Parish, 
Book Fee $100 



• Individualized Instruction through 
reduced class size 

• Science lab experience for students 
In grade K-8 

• Free private tutoring weelily 

• Totai Educational experience in 
a safe and orderly environment 

Call 471 -9071 inlToSSn 



• Spanish In grades 6-8 

• Computer, Art, Music & Physical Education 
In grades K-8 

• Extracurricular activities Includes: Baslcetball, 
Cheerieading, Science Club, Student Council, 
Choir, Orama Club, Photography Club 

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We are across from Veteran's Stadium 



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meet Tuesday, Feb. 2 at 7 
p.m. in the faculty lounge. 
Parents are encouraged to 
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refreshments and a door 
prize. 



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Sun Sports 



Thursday, January 28, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 13 



Hockey 



Quincy North Win 
Long-Time Coming 



By TOM SULLFVAN 

Whether or not the 
Quincy hockey team 
qualifies for the state 
tournament for the first 
time in more than 10 
years, the Presidents 
achieved one of their 
objectives last week when 
they defeated North 
Quincy for the first time in 
five years, 6-4. 

However, last Saturday 
was a loser for both teams 
as Quincy lost to 
undefeated Old Colony 
League leader Weymouth, 
7-2, and North was 
defeated by Falmouth, 3-1. 

Following these games 
Quincy's record was 7-4-2 
(4-3-1 in the league) and 
North dropped to 6-4-1 (3- 
3-1 in the league). 

The Presidents played 
Bridgewater-Raynham last 
night (Wednesday), will 
host Plymouth Saturday 
night at 7:50 at the Quincy 
Youth Arena and next 
Wednesday night will be 
home to Falmouth at 7:50. 

The Raiders played 
Barnstable last night 
(Wednesday), will play 
Silver Lake Saturday night 
at 6:40 at the Hobomock 
Rink in Pembroke and will 
be at Plymouth next 
Wednesday night. 

Sophomore David 
Cooper led Quincy over 
NorA Quincy with a hat 
trick and an assist. Jeff 
Craig, tied for the league 
scoring lead with 28 
points, had two goals and 
an assist and Sean 
McArdle had the other 
goal. Jamie Scbatzl had 
two assists and Scott 
MacPherson and Mark 
GUmore one each. 



For North Quincy, Joe 
Carinci, Lee Hughes, Jim 
Sapienza and Andrew 
Vermette had the goals 
and Dave Pacino, A.J. 
Carthas, Bob Flannery and 
Brendan O'Brien had 
assists. 

The teams were tied at 
1-1 after one period with 
Cooper scoring first and 
Hughes tying it up. 

"It was an even-Steven 
type of period," said 
(Juincy coach Bob Sylvia. 
"There weren't many shots 
because I think it was a 
feeling out period for both 
teams. But this finished 
the way a Quincy-North 
game should." 

The game was a typical 
Quincy-North contest with 
a lot of hard but clean 
hitting as the officials let 
the teams play with few 
penalties being called. 

Quincy had a 13-5 edge 
in shots but it was North 
that took a 2-1 lead in the 
second period when 
Carinci converted Carthas' 
pass and beat Quincy 
sophomore goalie Mark 
Smith. 

McArdle soon tied it 
with MacPherson assisting 
and, with time running 
down, Quincy took 
command with two goals 
in 51 seconds. Schatzl fed 
Cooper for his second goal 
and Craig scored with 
Schatzl and Cooper 
assisting. 

In the final period 
Quincy extended its lead 
to 5-2 when Craig scored 
his second goal. Sapienza 
scored with less than six 
minutes left and Vermette 
moved the Raiders to 



within one with a power 
play goal. 

With 22 seconds left 
Cooper scored into an 
empty net to complete his 
hat trick. 

In Saturday's loss to 
Weymouth (9-0-1) Quincy 
started well and trailed 
only 3-2 after one period 
but was blanked the rest of 
the way while the 
Wildcats added two goals 
in the second period and 
two more in the final 
session. 

"We had a good start 
but we just couldn't keep 
up with them," Sylvia said. 
"They have an excellent 
team and were too big and 
fast for us." 

Steve Provost scored 
Quincy's first goal with 
McArdle assisting and 
Schatzl scored the second, 
his 26th point (tied for 
third in the league) with 
Gilmore getting the assist. 

"It wasn't one of our 
better games, but the boys 
kept battling all the way," 
Sylvia said. 

Mike DesRoche scored 
North Quincy's lone goal 
against Falmouth, his 26th 
point (tied for third in the 
league) with John Gladu 
and Brian Fitzgerald 
assisting. 

A bright spot for the 
Raiders was the 
performance of sophomore 
Mike Manganaro in his 
first start in goal. 

"Mike did an excellent 
job for us and couldn't be 
faulted for Falmouth's 
goals," North coach Tom 
Benson said. "He had 
several tough saves." 



Last Helps 
lona To First 



Quincy's Ron Last 
scored one of the goals as 
the lona College hockey 
team edged Framingham 
State, 2-1, to win the 
championship of the 
annual Roger Williams 
tournament played in 
Portsmouth Abbey, R.I. 



The Gaels eliminated 
Stonehill, 6-5, in the 
opening round. 



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LEE ANN RYAN of Squantum 'iiigfa fives" her team captain, former Pittsburgh Steeler 
Rocky Blicr, at the Jim Beam Basic Dream Team game held recently in New Orleans. 
Ryan was one of 12 winners selected in the contest which allowed football fans the 
opportunity to Join former pros on the field. Ryan's team won, 26-24. 



Swimming 



North Defeats Taunton 



The North Quincy boys' 
swim team defeated 
Taunton, 99-65, last week 
and will host Cohasset 
today (Thursday) at 3:30 
at the Lincoln-Hancock 
School pool. 



Roche and Mike Ploof 
won and Jim Flaherty won 
the 200 and SOO fieestyles. 
Alan Morse won the 
diving, Ploof won the 100 
butterfly and Roche won 
the 100 breaststroke. 



The 200 medley relay ^fo^th lost to MUford, 
team of Greg Mackey, 98-97, in a meet not 
Erik Delorey, Terrence decided until the final 



event. 

Barry Canavan won the 
200 individual medley, 
Ploof won the 100 
backstroke, Flaherty won 
the 200 freestyle, and 
Morse won the diving. 

The 200 freestyle relay 
team of Ploof, Roche, 
Canavan and Delorey also 
woa 



North Football, Volleyball 
Champs To Be Honored Feb. 3 



North Quincy High 
School's state champion 
volleyball team and Super 
Bowl champion football 
team will be honored by 
Mayor James Sheets, the 
School Committee, City 
Council, and other elected 
officials, Wednesday, Feb. 
3 at 7:30 p.m. at North 
Quincy High School. 



A special presentation The public is invited to 



will be made to the 
members of the two teams 
prior to the School 
Committee meeting at the 
school auditorium. 



attend. 

The two teams will also 
be honored during a 
reception at 6 p.m. in the 
school cafeteria. 



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Page 14 QuiDcy Sun Thursday, January 28, 1993 



Mite House 



Sacred Heart Basketball 



Lydon, Harold Win 
Barry's, Samoset Tie 



Lydon-Russeli edged 
Neponset Valley Survey, 
5-4, in Mite House League 
action. 

Ryan Donahue had two 
goals and Jon Tallant, 
Matt Petit and Jimmy 
Cashins one each. Jordan 
Virtue had two assists, 
Ryan two and Jon 
Paquette and Tallent one 
each. 

Peter Torowski had two 
goals and Kevin 
Richardson and Steve Goff 
one each for Neponset 
Valley and Chris Sheehan, 

Jamie Chiocchio and 
Shawn Richardson had 
assists. 

Barry's Deli and 
Samoset Pharmacy tied, 4- 
4. Andy Ross and David 
Germain had two goals 
each for Barry's and Danny 
Coughlin, Pam Sullivan, 
Ryan Tobin and Ross had 
assists. 

Brian O'Hanley, Conrad 
Leger, Joe Cunningham 
and Shaun Haherty scored 
for Samoset. Billy Ryan 
had three assists and 
Leger, O'Hanley and Steve 
McGonagle one each. New 
goalies Matt Peters and 
Steve Kelley played well. 

Bruce Maggio, Mark 
Fitzpatrick, Charlie 
Sorrento and Josh Giordani 
had two goals each and 



Brian Lewis one as 
Granite Rail Pizza rolled 
over Purdy's Ice Cream, 9- 
1. Brendan Conley had 
four assists, Tom Curran 
two and Mike Steen, 
Lewis, Fitzpatrick, Bill 
McKEon, Maggio and 
Miah Hasson one each. 

The Paul Harold Club 
edged Campbell's Auto 
Service, 3-2, on two goals 
by Ryan Barr and one by 
Brian Stock. Matt Gregory 
had an assists. 

Matt Moriarty and Joe 
Callahan scored for 
Campbell's and Matt 
Alleva had an assist. 

In earlier games, 
Granite Rail blanked 
Harold, 2-0, with goalie 
Bruce Maggio recording 
the shutout. 

Mark Fitzpatrick and 
Billy McKeon scored the 
goals and Tom Curran, 
Mish Hasson and Brian 
Lewis had assists. 

Campbell's Auto 
Service melted down 
Purdy's, 7-2, as Joe 
Callahan had two goals 
and Sean Moriarty, Matt 
Alleva, Dan Durocher, 
John Chevalier and Mark 
Gibbons one each. 
Durocher had four assists 
and Jim Devlin, Matt 
Miller, Paul Flynn, 
Chevalier, Gibbons and 
Alleva one apiece. Steve 



Segalla and John Segalla 
scored for Purdy's and Joe 
Cronin had two assists and 
the Segallas one each. 

Neponset Valley Survey 
edged Samoset Pharmacy, 
4-3, with Matt Conso 
scoring twice and Kevin 
Richardson and Peter 
Turowski once each. 
George Sowhng Conso, 
Turowski and Jamie 
Chiocchio had assists. 
Billy Ryan, Joey 
Cunningham and Mike 
Maloney scored for 
Samoset and Steve 
McGonagle, Ryan and 
Brian O'Hanley had 
assists. 

Jon Tallent had four 
goals and Scott 
MacDonald a hat trick to 
lead Lydon-Russell over 
Barry's Deli, 13-2. Ryan 
Donahue had two goals 
and Brian Lynch, Jordan 
Virtue, Bryan Petit and 
Jimmy Cashins one 
apiece. Lynch and 

Matthew Petit had three 
assists apiece, Rob 
Mooney and Virtue two 
apiece and Tom Walsh, 
Steve O'Brien and 
Donahue, Cashins, Tallent 
and Jon Paquette one 
each. Matt Germain and 
Andy Ross scored for 
Barry's and Justin Swierk 
had an assist. 



Three Selected For 
Shriners Football Classic 



North Quincy's Liam 
Higgins and Dave Reinhart 
and Quincy's Mike 
Kavanaugh have been 
selected to play for the 
South squad in the annual 
Shriners High School 
Football Classic, Friday, 
June 18 at 7:30 p.m. at 
Boston University's 
Nickerson Held. 



Higgins had an 
outstanding year for North 
Quincy's undefeated Old 
Colony League and Div. 
IB Super Bowl champions. 

He led the Red Raiders 
in scoring with 39 points, 
kicked two game-winning 
field goals and threw 11 
touchdown passes. 

Reinhart was brilliant at 



tight end and defensive 
end as he had 26 
quarterback sacks and was 
a fine blocker and pass 
receiver. 

Kavanaugh was one of 
Quincy's top two-way 
players, standing out as 
offensive guard and 
hnebacker. 



Blessed Sacrament Girls 
To Play At BC Game 



The Most Blessed 
Sacrament Church CYO 
Girls basketball team 
(Cadette level) has been 
invited to play an 
exhibition game between 
the halves of the Boston 
College-University of 



Miami women's game this 
Sunday afternoon at 
Boston College's Conte 
Forum. 

The B.C.-Miami game, 
featuring All-American 
candidate Sarah Behn, 
will start at 2 o'clock. 



Blessed Sacrament will 
face St. Anne's team from 
Hyde Park. 

Proceeds will benefit 
the Boston College 
Campus School for 
Special Needs Children. 



Bowling 



Mastrantonio Team Wins 
St. John's First Half 



Jim Mastrantonio's 
team won the first half of 
St. John's Holy Name 
Bowling League with a 77- 
43 record, just edging Bob 
Saluti's team, which 
finished at 76-44. 

The second half is 
underway with 

Mastrantonio, Saluti and 
Joe Zaccheo tied at 6-2 
and Joe Matarazzo, John 
Grande and Mike Priscella 



tied at 2-6. 

Saluti and Priscella 
rolled the weekly high 
single of 120 and Don 
Gilliland had 115. 
Priscella had the high 
three of 332, Saluti had 
328 and Gilliland 316. 

Mastrantonio's team 
had the high single of 400 
and Zaccheo had 382. 
Mastrantonio also rolled 



the high three of 1148 and 
Saluti's team had 1073. 

The Top Ten: Saluti, 
108.08; Grande, 102.96; 
Priscella, 100.87; 
Gilliland, 99.85; 
Mastrantonio, 96.38; 
Matarazzo, 92.29; Dan 
Dieso, 91.36; Bud 
McAllister, 90.90; Rich 
Warner, 89.77; Zaccheo, 
89.62. 



By JOE HERN 

The Sacred Heart North 
Quincy Basketball League 
continues to provide loads 
of action with several 
close games including 
some inspiring come-from- 
behind fourth quarter 
blitzes. 

Rookie Girls (8-10): 
The Mighty Midgets 
defeated the Hip 
Hoopsters, 11-6, with 
Alicia Bell leading the 
scoring and Lindsay White 
providing soUd offense and 
defense. Kelley Heffeman 
played strong defense for 
the Hoopsters, Katie 
Sullivan hustled and 
Mehssa Vey shot well. 

The Celtics dropped the 
Dribblers, 12-7, in a tough 
battle. Jackie Suprey led 
the scoring and Kaitlin 
Smith played fine defense 
for the Celts. 

For the Dribblers, Julie 
Burke played relentless 
defense, Liz Furlong 
rebounded solidly and Erin 
Croke displayed good 
passing and ball handling. 

The Dalmations beat 
the Lightning Bolts, 18-10, 
in the season's best 
comeback. Down, 10-5, at 
the half, the Dalmations 
exploded for a 13-point run 
paced by Alison McGrath 
and Casey Dooley and 
aided by the key steals of 
Diane Lynch. 

For the Bolts, Katlyn 
Gates was a hot shooter, 
Kelley Manning played 
excellent defense and 
Shauna^Bums pulled down 
several big rebounds. 

Rookie Boys (8-10): 
The Hoyas triumphed over 
the 76ers, 40-29, led by 
the offense of Charlie 
Vidoli and the play of 

Chris Meam and the 
tenacious defense of Matt 
Mooney. The 76ers were 
led by Zack Eagan and 
bustling Josh Eagan and 
the rebounding and scoring 
of Matt Potter. 

The Hawks bested the 
Blazers, 29-20, behind 
Neal Gavin's passing, 
Justin Greene playing 
strong defense and Joe 
Mazrimas' outstanding 
rebounding. 

The Magic topped the 
Celtics, 13-6, in a great 
defensive battle. Billy 
Croke put up two big 
baskets, Mike Paul was 
strong on defense and 
Adam ©"Hare shot well at 
the foul line. 

The Celtics made a 
strong fourth quarter bid 
aided by the hustle of 
Gabriel Ho, the rebounding 
of Billy Clarke and the 
defense of Ketmy Lee. 

The Fighting Irish 
prevailed, 19-11, over the 
Bulls in a game that saw 
Brian Breslin protecting 
the lead and Dan Pritchard 
pulling down key rebounds. 
The Bulls came up short 
despite the play of point 
guard Pat Alessi, the 
strong defensive 

rebounding of Derek 
Keezer and the defensive 
play of Jason Moore. 
The Blue Devils 



becalmed the Hurricanes, Don Kavanaghs ball 

24-19, in a fourth quarter handling. 

surge that wiped out a Pro Girls (13-14): The 



three-point deficit. Pat 
Jeahnig hit the basket to 
put the Devils in front for 
good, Reid Donovan 
contributed two baskets 
and Steven Keenan scored 
a crucial hoop. David 
Jaehnig played tenacious 
defense. 

For the Hurricanes, 
Chris Ham was the key 
with his scoring and 
passing, Trevor Turner 

passed well and James 
Johnson played strong 
defense. 

College Girls (11-12): 
Boston College held on to 
a fourth quarter lead to 
defeat Notre Dame, 20-16. 
Shannon Hillis had four 
baskets and Stephanie 
Collins and Lisa O'Toole 
had two each. The teams 
were even through three 
quarters but the Irish were 
stunned by a 10-point 
Eagle surge. 

A full-court press led by 
Kristen Bowes and 
Dorothy Cronin produced 
six Irish points in the last 
minute. Caitlin Stempleski 
was solid at forward. 

Providence outgunned 
Georgetown, 18-12, with 
Kim Lavery hitting the key 
hoops, Kate Lavery 
controlling the ball, and 
the good defense of Laura 
Cadogan. 

The Hoyas were kept in 
the game by the ball 
handling of Laura Murphy 
and the solid defense of 
Melissa Pulera. 

College Boys (10-11): 
The Blue Devils toppled 
the Eagles, 29-24. In a 
great comeback, Jason 
London made the key 
shots. Randy Feetham 
grabbed key rebounds and 
Todd White contributed on 
defense. Matt O'Day shot 
solidly for the Eagles, 
Matt Stempleski made the 
big passes and Chris 
Chaput sparked the 
defense. 

The Hurricanes 
squeaked by the Celtics, 
30-28. Joe McRitchie 
made several dazzling 



Quincy Bay Bad Girls 
walloped Squad Skehan, 
44-11, with Kerry Ginty 
shooting well and 
Dominique Good playing 
unyielding defense as did 
M.B. Feeney. 

The Champions 
conquered Army, 29-14, 
paced by Sarah Lally's 10 
fast-break points, the 
strong offense of Sharon 
Marchbanks and Joanne 
Ford's tenacious defense. 
Army was led by Ann 
Galvin's six points, Kerry 
O'Donnell's four and the 
defense of Erin McVeigh. 

Pro Boys (12-14): The 
Kings took a 40-38 
overtime victory over the 
Magic. Brian Shields was 
big on offense, Mike Barry 
rebounded well and 
Anthony Caprigno played 
stingy defense. 

The Magic could not 
pull it off despite the play 
of Ryan Nickerson, the 
rebounding of Don 

Halpenny and the shooting 
of Jason Gibson. 

The Celtics pulled out 
of a 13-point hole but were 
kept at bay by the 
Warriors, who won an 
exciting 48-40 victory. Eric 
Wirtz led the scoring, 
Billy Manning showed fine 
ball handling and John 
Greene played a sohd two- 
way game for the Warriors. 

Tom Bowes hit 
numerous Celtic hoops, 
Mark Lawn made key 
offensive rebounds and Pat 
Stedman set up several 
hoops in a 13-2 run. 

Senior Boys (15-17): . 
The Sacred Heart 
Crusaders defeated St. 
Ann's, 39-25, with the lead 
changing several times 
before Sacred Heart surged 
ahead in the final minutes 
for its third straight win. 
Jared Howland, Tim 
Hannan and Dan Beaton 
were outstanding in the 
wia 

The instructional 
division teams (ages 5-7) 
continue to improve each 



layups, Brian Burke week and are learning the 
played well at both ends ft»°damentals of the game 



and Ryan Davidson hit the 
winning basket at the wire 
to top off an inspiring 
effort. 

The Running Rebels 
curbed the Tar Heels, 29- 
20, with Ian Cain setting 
the defense, T.J. Bell 
grabbing key rebounds and 
Steve Mananell showing 
lots of hustle. Robbie 
Hanna and Rick 
Loughmiller hustled for the 
Tar Heels and Sean 
Hayhurst was solid with 
his shooting. 

The Fighting Irish got 
by the Pitt Panthers, 18- 
17, in a successful 
comeback engineered by 
Fred Butts and Mike 
Reidy and guarded by 



Instructional Division: 

For the 5-year-olds the 
following rookies have 
been having fun and 
improving as well: Joe 
Sullivan, Juliana Eagles, 
Dennis Magaldi, Justin 
Marotta, Ashley Bell, Tom 
Cabral, Krista Duval and 
Michael Paulson. 

In the six-year-old 
conference, the 

FUNdamentals are being 
absorbed by Matt Baker, 
Susie Lynch, Mark 
Montillo, Alex Kirsh, 
Jennifer Johnson, 
Cassandra Connolly, 
Jonathan Dakoulas, 
Amanda Murphy and 
Kevin Barry. 

Among the seven-year- 
olds honing their skills are 



Teddy Phillips' strong Marcus Cranczak, Joe 



defense 

The Panthers were 
aided by several Henry 
Dinino field goals, Jimmy 
Parastides' passing and 



Doyle, Kerri Shields, Ryan 
McFarland, Chris 
Stivaletta, Laura Delaney, 
Sean Drews, Zack Trainor 
and Jessica Smialek. 



Thursday, January 28, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 15 



Basketball 



North Runs 
Hot And Cold 



The North Quincy boys' 
basketball team continues 
to run hot and cold. 

After losing three 
heartbreakers in a row, the 
Raiders bounced back with 
two straight wins but last 
Friday dropped a 68-55 
decision to Falmouth, 
dropping their record to 6- 
7. 

North Quincy, which 
already has lost two more 
games than it did all last 
year, played at Barnstable 
Tuesday, will be home to 
Silver Lake Friday night at 
7 and will be at Taunton 
Wednesday night at 7. 

Luke Sheets had 
another big night for North 
against Falmouth with 20 
points and eight rebounds, 
while Brian Raftery had 15 



points for his best point 
production of the season, 
and Sean Donovan 
chipped in with 12 points 
and seven assists. 

The teams were tied at 
28-28 at the half but 
Moses Power, who scored 
18 points for Falmouth, 
scored 14 in the second 
half to enable the Cape 
team to puU away. 

Earlier in the week 
Donovan led North over 
Plymouth, 55-50, with 24 
points, including three 
three-pointers. 

Donovan hit two free 
throws with 11 seconds to 
play to clinch the victory. 

Bo Smith had one of his 
best games with 18 points 
while Jason McLeod had 
eight points and grabbed 
1 1 rebounds. 



Quincy's 
Problems 
Continue 



The Quincy boys' 
basketball team's troubles 
coatinued last Friday night 
when the Presidents lost to 
Weymouth, 57-49, 
diq)ping its record to 4-8. 

Quincy played 

Bridgewater-Raynham 
Tuesday, will be at 
Plymouth Monday night 
aoid home to Falmouth 
next Wednesday night at 7 
o'clock. 

In the loss to 
Weymouth, Tom Malvesti 
scored 14 points, John 
Russell had 13 and Robbie 
Kane had 12. 

Quincy was unable to 



stop the Wildcats' Alex 
MacPhee, who scored 24 
points and had 10 
rebounds. Earlier in the 
week, Quincy defeated 
Taunton, 73-64, as Kane 
had another big night with 
21 points, eight steals and 
five rebounds. 

The Presidents led only 
38-37 at the half but a 
strong defensive effort in 
the second half, 
spearheaded by Kane and 
Jon Gangi enabled Quincy 
to pull away. 

Gangi had 10 points 
while Joe Kelly had a big 
game with 15. 



Executive Hockey 



Paolucci's 5 Goals 
Sparks Flibotte's 



Mark Paolucci scored 
five goals to lead 
Flibotte's Auto Sales to a 
6-4 victory over Grumpy's 
Pub in Quincy Executive 
Hockey League action at 
the Youth Arena. 

Peter Bertrand scored 
the other goal and John 
Norton had three assists, 
Jim MuUaney two and 
Rick Patten one. Mark 
Boultier scored twice and 
John Andrews and Kevin 
Harnett once each for 
Grumpy's. Andrews had 
two assists and Rick 
Joyce, Randall, Ted VUes, 
Paul Veneziano and Mark 
Flaherty one each. 

South Shore Bearing 
defeated Adams Sports, 6- 
3, as Don Peidios and Tom 



Cahill had two goals each 
and Bob Carroll and 
Frankie Guest one q)iece. 
Carroll had three assists, 
Perdios and Guest two 
each and Chip Linscott 
one. John Yaxter had a hat 
trick for Adams and Doug 
McLean and Mark 
Giordani had two assists 
apiece and Bob Fowkes 
and Jack Fowkes one 
each. 

Fowler House topped 
Beacon Sports, 5-1, as Ed 
Linehan had a hat trick 
and Glen Snaith and Dave 
Mullen a goal each. Snaith 
had two assists and John 
Ryan and Peter Janis one 
each. Art Boyle scored for 
Beacon and Jack Duffy 
assisted. 




THE NORTH QUINCY basketball team has had a hot 
and cold season so far. Kneeling, from left are Mike 
Staiti, Chris Dupill and Pat Shea. Standing, Brad 
Douglas, Joe Welby, Mike Patch, Luke Sheets, Tim 



Byrne, Sean Warren, Jason McLeod, Brian Raftery, Bo 
Smith, Sean Donovan, Bob Johnston and manager Joe 
Rusdo. 



Youth Hockey 



Squirt Bs Qualify For State Tourney 



Quincy's Squirt B 
hockey team, sponsored by 
Continental Cablevision, 
blanked Canton, 3-0, in its 
final playdown game and 
qualified for the state 
tournament this spring. 

Quincy, with previous 
wins over Weymouth and 
Franklin, must play one 
more game before Monday 
to determine its seeding. 

The strong Canton 
defense, which has 
allowed only 11 goals all 
season, held the game 
scoreless until the last four 



minutes when Frank 
Curreri, assisted by John 
Sullivan and Paul Burke, 
finally scored. This was 
the beginning of the end 
for Canton as Chris 
Cullen, assisted by Mike 
Sullivan, and Ryan 
Murray, unassisted, a(kled 
goals. 

Jeff Langille and Ryan 
Krueger were outstanding 
in goal and John 
Katsarikas and Joe Watson 
played strong defense. 

In the recent Coca-Cola 
Tournament in Bourne the 



Squirt Bs won two out of 
three games. 

In the first game Quincy 
blanked the West Bay 
Islanders, 6-0, with Didier 
Alther scoring twice and 
Matt Gibbons, Mike 
Sullivan, Ryan Murray and 
Chris Griffin once each. 
Kiva Tupe had two assists 
and Cullen, Murray, Jamie 
Parisi and Gibbons one 
each. Curreri and Watson 
played outstanding 
defense. 

Quincy topped the 



Seahawks, 6-2, with 
Matthew O'Connell, John 
Sullivan, Alther, Murray, 
Curreri, and Mike SuUivan 

scoring the goals. Gibbons 
and Burice had two assists 
apiece and Tupe and 
Curreri one each. Parisi 
and Domenic Papile 
sparkled on defense. 

Quincy's only loss 
came at the hands of Cape 
Cod, 3-2. Alther had both 
goals and Curreri, John 
Sullivan and Gibbons had 
assists. 



Pee Wee Bs Land State Tourney Berth 



Quincy's Pee Wee B 
hockey team defeated 
Canton, 4-1, and qualified 
for the state 

championships in March. 

Quincy played Milton 



Squirt House 



Tuesday night for top and 
bottom seed positions after 
which the team will move 
on to the championship 
rounds. 

Mike Powers had two 



Smith's Hat Trick 
Powers Doran, 5-3 



Burgin Platner holds a 
three-point lead in the 
Squirt House League 
following a 2-1 victory 
over Johnson Motor Parts. 

Sean LeFebvre had 
both goals for Burgin. 
Chris Carthas scored for 
Johnson and Paul 
Markarian had an assist. 

Granite Auto Electric 
topped Green 

Environmental, 5-2, as 
Ryan Doyle had a hat trick 
and Steve Wilkie and 
Mike Welch a goal each. 
Dan Kennedy had two 
assists and Matt 
O'Connell, Brian Sylvester 
and Nick Pizziferri one 
each. Andrew Nestor and 
Mike Whalen scored for 
Green and Matt Gibbons 



had two assists and Nestor 
one. 

Adam Smith's hat trick 
led Doran & Horrigan over 
the Quincy Sun, 5-3. Ryan 
Krueger and Chad 
Fitzpatrick had a goal 
each. Robbie Bell had two 
assists and Chris Lee and 
Pat Kenney one each. John 
Graziano, Ashley 
Rowerdink and Joe 
Watson scored for the Sun 
and Rowerdink, Scott 
Keefe, Kevin Mason and 
Sean Haidul bad assists. 

The standings: Burgin 
Platner, 8-2-2; Doran & 
Horrigan, 7-4-1; Quincy 
Sun, 7-5; Johnson Motor, 
5-6-1; Green Environ- 
mental, 3-7-2; Granite 
Auto Electric, 2-8-2. 



goals for Quincy against 
Canton and Mike Sullivan 
and Brad Macauley one 
each. Andre Nagy and 
Jonathan Haddad had 
assists. 

The states have been a 
team goal," said coach 
Bill Connolly. "Our boys 
are very focused and 
everyone is contributing in 
every game. They are 
playing great hockey." 

The Pee Wee Bs have 
moved to the finals of the 
Coca-Cola Tournament in 
Bourne after defeating 
West Bay, R.I., 6-4; South 
Shore Seahawks, 3-2; and 
the host Cape Cod team. 



4-1. 

John Laukkanen and 
John Masone were 
outstanding in goal and 
several players scored two 
or more goals. 

Nagy had three goals, 
Mike Sullivan, Bobby 
Hall, Macauley and Kevin 
Cellucci two apiece and 
Haddad and Bill Connolly 
one each. Mark Hawes, 
Powers and John Barron. 

Matt McDonough, 
Glemi Chase, Dan Stock, 
Pat Coughlin, and Tim 
Lewis held the blue Unes 
in superb manner, limiting 
their opponents to less 
than 12 shots a game. 



Quincy Football 
Parents Dinner Feb. 14 




CFMASSACHUSETTSRffif 



The Quincy Football 
Parents Club will hold its 
annual awards dinner 
honoring the football team 
and cheerleaders Sunday, 
Feb. 14 from 2 to 6 p.m. at 
the Sons of Italy Social 



Center. 

Following dinner there 
will be a guest speaker 
and the presentation of 
individual awards to 
players. 



Quincy, N^^ WMMr 
Home Sports Schedule 



Jan. 27 thru Feb. 2 



Wednesday, Jan. 27 

• NQHS hockey vs. Barnstable, 5:30 JV, 6:40 
Varsity. 

• Wrestling, NQHS @ QHS, 7:00. 

Thursday, Jan. 28 

• NQHS boys swimming vs. Cohasset. 

Friday, Jan. 29 

• NQHS boys basketball vs. Silver Lake, 3:30 
freshmen, 5:30 JV, 7:00 V. 

Saturday, Jan. 30 

• QHS hockey vs. Plymouth, 5:30 V, 7:50 JV. 

Monday, Feb. 1 

• NQHS girls basketball vs. A.W.H.S., 5:30 
JV, 7:00 V. 

• QHS girls basketball vs. Plymouth, 3:30 
freshmen, 5:30 JV, 7:00 V. 

Tuesday, Feb. 2 

• No home games scheduled. 



Page 16 Quincy Sua Thursday, January 28, 1993 




Volleyball 



QUINCV'S Mite B hockey team won the division title in the recent North Quincy K. of 
C. tournament at the Quincy Youth Arena, going undefeated. Front, left to right, 
Jeremiah Hasson, Scott Marlcarian, Matt Glynn, Meredith Langille and Kevin Patten. 
Second row, John Chevalier, Franli Guest, Dan Sheehan, Tom Hughes, Shaun Flaherty, 
Joe Cunningham, Pat Lahar, and Billy McKeon. In back are coaches Dennis Murray, 
left, and Jay Cunningham. 

Mite Bs Run Win Streak To 15 



Quincy's Mite B 
hockey team, after a slow 
start, is on a roll and has 
won its last 15 games, 
including the 

championship in the K. of 
C. tournament. 

Quincy blanked South 
Boston, 3-0, in the title 
game with Matt Glynn 
having an outstanding 
game in goal. 



The Mite B's went on 
to win the Coca-Cola 
Tournament in Bourne 
with a 9-2 win over the 
South Shore Seahawks in 
the finals. 

Quincy's forwards are 
Tom Hughes, Frank Guest, 
Joe Cunningham, Dan 
Sheehan, Billy McKeon, 
Shaun Flaherty, Pat Lahar, 



John Chevalier, and John 
and Stephen Segalla. 

The defense, which 
held all the tourney teams 
under three goals a game, 
includes Jeremiah Hasson, 
Kerien Patten, Merry 
Langille, Scott Markarian 
and Matthew Miller. 

The other goalie is Matt 
MiUer. 



Pee Wee A's Win 
State Tourney Berth 



Quincy's Pee Wee A 
hockey team qualified for 
the state championship 
tournament with wins over 
Dedham and Wellesley in 
playdown competition. 

The defense came up 
big in both games, 
allowing only three goals 
in the two games. Matt 
Langille, Brian Degan, 
Steve Verlicco and Tim 
Wood kept the Dedham 
players out of the Quincy 
zone all night as Quincy 



rolled to a 9-1 victory. 

Against Wellesley the 
competition was much 
greater with the score tied 
at two going into the third 
period. The defense was 
strong again as Quincy 
scored three goals for a 5-2 
win while holding 
Wellesley scoreless. 

Scott Cooper had a hat 
trick and Robbie Winter 
and Mike Ryan had a goal 
each. Jim Hasson, Derek 
McTomney, Mark Glynn 



and Mike Ryan had 
assists. 

In Greater Boston 
League competition 
Quincy lost a 3-1 lead and 
was tied by Canton, 4-4. 

Goalie Brian Beaton 
made some outstanding 
saves against a powerful 
Canton offense. 

Ryan had two 
unassisted goals and 
Winter also scored twice. 
Verlicco, Hasson, Langille 
and Ryan bad assists. 



Easter Seal Volleyball Sign Up Underway 



Registration is 

underway for the 13th 
annual Century 21 -Easter 
Seal Volleyball Games 
March 20, 21 and 27 at 
North Quincy High School. 

The Games support 
Easter Seal services for 
men, women and children 
with disabihties. 



Any group can organize 
a team, with competition 
at every level from 
beginner to champion. 
Each team wins a trophy 
and all players have the 
satisfaction of helping to 
make a difference for 
people with disabilities. 

Prizes include t-shirts, 



4 North Quincy Players 
On All-Scholastic Team 



Joanne Curreri, 
Maureen McCarthy, 
Regina Murphy and 
Heather Rendle, students 
at North Quincy High 
School, were named to the 
1992 Boston Globe All- 
Scholastic Volleyball 
Team. 

Rendle was named 
Player of the Year. 

Curreri, a 5-foot- 10-inch 
senior, has challenged 
fellow Old Colony League 
players this season as well 
as dominating state 
toumament play. The two- 
time league all-star is also 
a member of the National 
Honor Society. Earning 
marks in the top seven 
percent of her class. 



Curreri plans to attend 
Rutgers, Colgate, 
Providence or Bucknell in 
the fall. 

McCarthy, a two-time 
member of the Old Colony 
League all-star team, 
moved up from last year's 
second-team with her 
outstanding play this 
season. All all-tournament 
selection in the Sweet 
Home Challenge, the 
junior is her class vice 
president, in the top six 
percent of her class and a 
member of the National 
Honor Society. 

Murphy was a key 
factor in North Quincy's 

second straight Division 1 
title. She is a two-time all- 



scholastic and a three-time 
Old Colony League all- 
star. The 5-foot-l 1-inch 
senior is in the top five 
percent of her class and a 
member of the National 
Honor Society. She is 
interested in attending 
Brown, Colgate, 

Georgetown, Providence or 
Vermont. 

Rendle led her team to 
the state championships 
this year as she earned her 
second all-scholastic 
honors. The 5-foot- 11-inch 
senior is a high honors 
student and secretary of 
the student council. She is 
interested in becoming a 
teacher and plans to attend 
Bucknell or Vermont next 
faU. 



Higgins, Reinhart On 
All-Scholastic Team 



Converse sneakers. Red 
Sox tickets, gift 
certificates and a vacation 
trip through Uniglobe 
Travel. The games are co- 
sponsored by WLVI-TV56. 

For help in forming a 
team or registration call 1- 
800-922-8290 or 482-3375. 




Liam Higgins and Dave 
Reinhart, both seniors at 
North Quincy High School, 
were named to the 1992 
Boston Globe All- 
Scholastic football team. 

Higgins triggered North 
Quincy's Division IB 
championship offense. He 
passed for 1,720 yards and 
1 1 touchdowns, leading his 
club to the Old Colony 
League title. 

He also ran for five 
touchdowns and kicked 
three field goals, including 
a game-winner against 



Youth 



Basketball 



Quincy 

Bows 

To Milton 

Quincy's eighth grade 
team lost a 30-28 decision 
to Milton in the Presidents 
Youth Basketball League. 

Quincy's record is 0-6 
but most of its losses have 
been by three points or 
less. 

Quincy's seventh grade 
team lost in double 
overtime to Milton, 42-39. 
A three-point shot by 
Downey tied the game in 
regulation time. Ryan Ross 
was Quincy's high scorer 
with 1 1 points, followed by 
Chiavaro with eight. 
Quincy's record fell to 1-5. 

Quincy's sixth grade 
team continues to roll and 
defeated Milton, 43-30, to 
improve its record to 5-1. 

Steve Roberts had a big 
game with 20 points, 
Montes had nine and Joe 
Kearney, Dan Kelly and 
Maik Robertson had four 
each. Anthony Placid and 
Doyle played fine games. 

Save Gat and Money 
Shop Locally 



Bridgewater-Raynham . 
When the offense didn't 
move the ball, he 
contributed with a 38-yard 
punting average. Higgins 
enjoys stickball and 
basketball. 

Reinhart was the Old 
Colony League Player of 
the Year after absolutely 
dominating opposing 



offenses. He had 120 
tackles, 29 sacks, an 
interception, forced three 
fumbles and recovered 
seven. The 6-2, 210-pound 
defensive end used 
outstanding quickness to 
put constant pressure on 
quarterbacks. He lists his 
favorite hobby as 
snowboarding. 



South Shore YMCA 
Program Calendar 



The South Shore YMCA, 79 Coddington St., Quincy, is 
offering the following programs beginning Monday, Feb. 
1, Tuesday, Feb. 2 or Wednesday, Feb. 3. 

For registration information, call the Y at 479-8500 ext. 
135. 

Monday, Feb. 1 

•Two coed volleyball programs. Volleyball I will be for 
beginners on Wednesday nights and Volleyball U will be 
for advanced players on Monday nights from 8 to 10 p.m. 

•Eight-week fitness program for new mothers in the new 
Nautilus Research Center. Classes are held 7 to 8 p.m. or 
8 to 9 p.m. 

•"Y's Workout" class, 6: 15 p.m. or 7 a.m. A 60-minute 
workout including running or cycling and calisthenic exer- 
cise. 

•"Coed Aerobics" class, a hi-lo combo aerobics class for 
the beginner to the intermediate. Classes offered Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. 

•Learn to be Lean exercise class for individuals who want 

to lose weight and improve fitness level. Qasses meet 

Tuesday and Thursday, 7 to 8 p.m. or Monday and 

Wednesday, 10 to 1 1 a.m. Qass begins Feb. 1 and Feb. 2. 

Tuesday, Feb. 2 

•Coed Aerobic conditioning class for teens, ages 12-17. 
Classes are held from 3 to 4 p.m. 

•New Senior Nautilus Exercise Program for seniors age 
5 5 and older. Classes meet Tuesday and Thursday at 9 a.m . 

•"Step Aerobics" for men and women involving stepping 
up and down on an adjustable platform while performing 
upper body movements. Qasses are held Tuesday and 
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. and Friday at 6 p.m. 

•Revised Healthy Back program includes relaxation ex- 
ercises, low back flexibility exercises, and strengthening 
exercises for postural muscles. Classes meet Tuesday and 
Thursday frran 6:15 to 7 p.m. 

•Pre-Natal exercise, a medically approved exercise pro- 
gram for pregnant women from first through third trimester. 
Classes are Tuesday and Thursday, 7 to 8 p.m. 
Wednesday, Feb. 3 

•Weight Control Support Group focusing on sensible 
changes in nutrition and lifestyle taught by registered 
dietician. Begins Feb. 3 at 7 p.m. 

•Yoga, an eight- week exercise class designed to improve 
body and mental control. Class times arc Wednesday at 
9:30 a.m. or 7 p.m. 



Thursday, January 28, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 17 



Sparks Car Care Center 
Celebrates 10th Anniversary 



Sparks Computerized 
Car Care Center, 664 
Washington St., Quincy, is 
celebrating its 10th 
anniversary. 

A full range of 
automotive services are 
being offered by the 
Waggenheims, who have 
locally owned and 
operated this center for the 
past 10 years. 

Debbie and Bernice 
Waggenheim begin their 
day behind the counter by 
personally greeting each 
customer. One facet of 
their responsibility 
includes translating 
customer's symptom 
descriptions into potential 
problem areas. 

"The better we 
understand the problem, 
the better we can service 
the vehicle, and satisfy our 
customers," says Debbie. 
"Bemie and I try to make 
our customers feel 
comfortable and confident 



that they've banded their 
car over to a 
knowledgeable, competent 
technician. Our personal 
service and our technical 
ability is what keeps 
customers coming back. 
That's the backbone of our 
operation— repeat 
business." 

Bernie Waggenheim 
has been involved in the 
automotive aftermarket for 
31 years. His staff of ASE 
Certified Technicians offer 
over 18 years of combined 
automotive experience. 

"We've made many 
technological changes 
through the years. We 
continually update 
equipment in order to be 
on top of the latest 
advances in the auto 
industry. Our technicians 
are put through a rigorous 
training and testing 
program, and are updated 
on the latest advances and 
changes in the industry," 



Bemie said. 

The Sparks in Quincy 
has not only expanded 
their technology, but has 
expanded their services 
too. Sparks provides 
computerized diagnostics, 
along with tune-ups, fiiel 
injection services, oil 
changes, radiator flushes, 
and air conditioning 
recharges. In addition, 
Sparks has extended its 
repair menu to include: 
brakes, valve adjustments, 
carburetors, alternators, 
shocks, starters, batteries, 
etc. 

The Waggenheims 
explained that they stand 
behind all work performed 
at their shop. It's simply 
stated in the Sparks Triple 
Guarantee: Price-the 
written quote is the price 
you pay; Parts— meet or 
exceed manufacturer's 
specifications; and 
Performance-all work is 
covered for 12 months or 
12,000 miles. 



Lydon Funeral Home Renews 
Lofty Oaks Membership 



Lydon Funeral Home of 
Quincy has renewed its 
affiliation with Lofty Oaks 
Association, a New 
Hampshire organization 
dedicated to reforestation 
and conservation efforts in 
Massachusetts. 

The firm arranges to 
have a tree planted for 
each service that they 
perform to provide a Uving 
memorial in honor of the 



deceased and to renew ti.^ 
forest life of 

Massachusetts. 

The memorial trees are 
planted in the spring and 
fall. This program is part of 
a large endeavor, to 
restore the landscape and 
our environment with the 
eternal beauty of living 
trees. 

After each service, 
close family members and 



Shaw's Donates $6,150 
To 'Make A Wish Foundation' 



Shaw's Supermarkets, 
Inc., announces it donated 
$6,150 to the "Make A 
Wish Foundation" to 
benefit sick children. 

Donations were made 
through the Company's 
Holiday Assistance 
Program. 

The program was 



initiated to provide 
corporate and regional 
office associates the 
opportunity to work side by 
side with their store 
counterparts. More than 
800 Shaw's employees 
took part. 

'"This was an obvious 
win-win situation for 



everyone. Our customers 
received superior service 

during this holiday season, 
Shaw's associates worked 

well together and sick 
children's lives were 
enriched," said Phil 
Francis, Shaw's CEO. 



O'Connor & Drew Adds 5 Employees 



O'Connor & Drew, P.C, 
Certified Public 

Accountants, 400 Crown 
Colony Drive, Quincy, 
announces the addition of 
five new members to its 
staff. 

Kevin Cames, Joseph 
Moscarito, Roman 
Viktorov and Cheryl 
Wilson will join the 
company as staff 
accountants and Mitchell 
Halpem will join the tax 
department. 



Cames, a graduate of 
Stonehill College, 
previously worked for 
Alexander, Aronson, 
Finning & Co., 
Westborough. 

Moscarito, a graduate 
of Bentley College, 
interned with Leydon & 
Gallagher, CPAs, 
Burlington. 

Viktorov, a graduate of 
Clark University, 
previously worked with 
State Street Bank and 



grew up in the former 
Soviet Union. 

Wilson, a graduate of 
UMass-Boston, was 
previously employed by 
Bums & Levinson, Boston. 

Halpem, a graduate of 
Boston University Law 
School, has an extensive 
background working with 

tax and legal issues and 
most recently in his own 
practice as a financial 
advisor to professional 
athletes. 



Business & Real estate 



Evelyn O'Connor, Phil Monaghan 
Join De Wolfe Quincy Office 



Evelyn O'Connor and 
Phil Monaghan have 
joined the DeWolfe New 
England Quincy office. 

An active member of 
the real estate community, 
O'Connor is Quincy's 
Quality Circle 

Representative for 
DeWolfe. Currently she is 
attending the "Sweathogs" 
training program. 

A lifelong resident of 
Quincy, she has been 
involved in Quincy 
Baseball and Soccer. She 
Uves in Wollaston with her 
husband, Robert, and their 
four children. 

O'Connor has been 
cited as a "top producer" 




EVELYN O'CONNOR 

for the 1992 fourth quarter 
in the Quincy office. 

A member of the 
Quincy-South Shore 
Board, Monaghan has 
been involved in real 
estate investment and 
management since 1980. 
His expertise is especially 



PfflL MONAGHAN 

strong in investment/multi- 
family housing. 

Monaghan has coached 
soccer in the Milton 
League and is active in 
the Knight of Columbus 
and the American Legion. 
He and his wife, Johanna, 
live in Milton and have 
four children. 



South Shore Bank 
Promotes 3 To Vice President 



friends are informed that 
the memorial tree has 
been arranged for by 
Michelle and John J. 

Lydon Jr. of the Lydon 
Funeral Home. When a 
certified nurseryman has 
planted the tree, the 
designated people will 
receive a certificate of 
planting suitable for 
framing and keeping in the 
family's history. 



The South Shore Bank 
Board of Directors has 
promoted Lynne P. 
Bucklen, Wayne J. Silva 
and Kathryn M. O'Malley 
to vice president. 

The announcement was 
made by Jerome L. Olin, 
executive vice president in 
charge of the bank's 
commercial lending 
function. 

Having previously been 
employed by the bank as a 
summer employee in 1981, 
Bucklen rejoined the bank 
in July 1984 as a credit 
trainee. She was elected a 
credit analyst in June 
1985, promoted to loan 
officer, commercial 
banking, in February 1986, 



assistant vice president in 
December 1987 and 
second vice president in 
July 1989. She is a 
graduate of Stonehill 
College with a B.S. degree 
in business administration. 

Silva joined the 
commercial services group 
as a second vice president 
in April 1987. Prior to 
joining the bank he was 
employed as corporate 
credit manager at 
Computervision Corp., 
Bedford. He received a 
B.S. degree from Boston 
College School of 
Management and a M.B.A. 
degree from Boston 
College. 

O'Malley joined the 
bank in June 1981 as a 
summer teller. She joined 



the credit department in 
July 1984 as a credit 
trainee, was elected credit 
analyst in June 1985, 
promoted to loan officer 
for commercial real estate 
in February 1986, to 
assistant vice president in 
December 1987, and 
second vice president in 
July 1989. She is a 
graduate of Wheaton 
College with a B.A. degree 
in mathematics and 
received her master's 
degree in finance from 
Boston College. 

South Shore Bank is an 
affiliate of Multibank 
Financial Corp., and 
maintains 42 branches 
throughout Norfolk, Bristol 
and Barnstable Counties. 



Devine & Pearson Wins Two Awards 



Walter White Addresses 
Remodeling Contractors 



Devine & Pearson of 
Quincy won awards in both 
the advertising and design 
divisions in this year's 
Communication Arts 
competition. 

This year, there were 
over 25,000 entries. Only 
550 of these were selected 
as top award winners. 

Devine & Pearson 
Creative Director John 
Pearson said: 

"As a full-service 
agency, we always strive 
to offer our clients 
excellent creativity in 
every area, from 
advertising, to design, to 
direct marketing. That's 
why winning in both 
Communication Arts 
shows is such a satisfying 
accomplishment." 

In the Communication 
Arts design show, Devine 
& Pearson was recognized 



for its efforts on behalf of 
DiCenso's. 

Devine & Pearson is 
one of the Boston area's 
largest advertising firms 
and is recognized for its 
skill in marketing products 
and services to the 



and 



consumer, trade 
business-to-business 
sectors. The firm has won 
numerous other creative 
awards including Hatch, 
Gio, NEDMA, Andy, Best 
of Broadcasting and 
NEBA. 



Walter White, a Quincy 
remodeling contractor, 
addressed the recent 
national remodelers show 
in Pittsburgh. 

White, owner of the 
White Construction 
Company and Boston 
Bathworks, 169 Beale St., 
discussed the importance 
of good design in kitchen 



and bath remodeling. He 
said remodeling 

contractors must develop a 
better appreciation for 
quaUty design and be able 
to offer customers 
effective design services 
in order to continue to 
attract business. 

The show attracted 



7,000 remodelers and was 
sponsored by the National 
Association of Home 
Builders' Remodelers 
Council and Remodeling 
Magazine. 

White is a member of 
the board of directors of 
the Builders Association of 
Greater Boston. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 




by Tony Centorino, Bill Starkie and Kevin McGroarty 



INFLATED EXPECTATIONS 

Where automobiles are percent of new cars are 



corx:erned, there seems to 
be one kind of inflation with 
which car buyers can live - 
the inflation of an air bag. 
This is one safety feature 
that the car buying public 
seems to have accepted 
quite readily. According to 
many, this type of passive 
restraint system has the 
advantage of being out of 
sight and out of mind (until it 
is needed), as well as being 
effective. It must be pointed 
out, however, that to be truly 
effective, air bags should 
be used in combination with 
buckled lap/shoulder belts. 
This buckled-in strategy 
owes itself to the fact that air 
bags are most effective in 
head-on collisions, but offer 
very limited protection from 
skJe impacts or rollovers. 
By the 1 9d5 model year, 90 



expected to have driver and 
passenger-side air bags. 

HVffT: Accordingtothe 
National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration, air 
bags will save an estimated 
2,400 lives between 1990 
and 1996. 

The technicians at LEO 
& WALTS SUNOCO will do 
their part in making sure 
every system in your car is 
property maintained. Here 
at 258 Quincy Ave., E. 
Braintree, 843-1550, we 
look forward to meeting you 
and giving your carthe same 
level of personal attention 
we give our own. 'A Place 
Where Your Car Can Live 
Longer. ' SurKxx) and most 
major credit cards honored. 
Open Mon.-Fri. 6 am-9 pm, 
Sat. 7am-^)m, Sun. 9am- 
5pm. 



Page 18 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 28, 1993 



WfSWItafSf!! 



COMMONWEAL-m OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P0083A1 
Estate of ROBERT J. 
HAYES late of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that CHRISTOPHER J. 
HAYES of ARLINGTON in 
the County of MIDDLESEX 
be appointed administrator 
of said estate without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
March 3, 1993. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the eighteenth 
day of January, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Rcglttcr of Probate 

1/28/93 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 
THE PROBATE 

AND FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P0027A1 

Estate of ANGELINA 

TAVERNA late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that BRIAN E. DONOVAN 
of QUINCY in the County 
of NORFOLK be appointed 
administrator of said 
estate with surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
Febnjary24, 1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this eleventh day 
of January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/28/93 



License Board Briefs 



The Quincy License 
Board took the following 
action at its meeting 
Tuesday: 

•Granted a request from 
Pizza Hut, 627 
Washington St. for a 
change of manager from 
Lori Moore to Wayne 
SUva. 

•Granted a request from 
Houghs Neck 

Congregational Church, 
310 Manet Ave. (Susan 
Catrambone) for a one-day 
auctioneer's license for an 
auction Monday, Feb. 15 
to be sponsored by the 
Mothers and Others Club 
and Boy Scout Troop 6. 

•Postponed for one 
week a request from St. 
Mary's Church, 115 



Crescent St. (Paul 
Connolly) for a one-day 
liquor license for a 
Country & Western Dance 
Saturday, Feb. 6 from 8 
p.m. to midnight 

•Granted a request from 
The Woodward School, 
1102 Hancock St. (Ann 
Silverman) for a one-day 
Uquor license for use at its 
Parents Club-sponsored 
Las Vegas Nite Saturday, 
Feb. 6 from 7 p.m. to 
midnight. 

•Granted a request from 
St. John's Church, 44 
School St. (Rev. Peter 
Quinn) for a one-day liquor 
Ucense for an adult dance 
to be held Saturday, Feb. 
13 from 8 p.m. to midnight. 



Jeff Bovarnick Passes 
State Bar Examination 



Jeff A. Bovarnick of 
Quincy passed the 
Massachusetts state bar 

■W.^UJMM.Jj.^V Ji i .l.i. l .l. i .U.'.U-.'.l. l . i . i .U .... 1 1 1 1 ] I . I .... 1 1 1 . 

iiilHiPHiiii 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P0094E1 
Estate of ROGER W. 
FORBUSH. Sr., late of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that DONALD 
R. FORBUSH of 
MARSTONS HILLS in the 
County of BARNSTABLE 
be appointed executor 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on March 3, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the eighteenth 
day of January, one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

1/28/93 



examination administered 
last July. 

He is a graduate of the 
New England School of 
Law in Boston. 

UOAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P0073E1 
Estate of MARY T. NEE 
late of QUINCY In the 
County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that DENIS M. 
NEE of HANOVER in the 
County of PLYMOUTH be 
appointed executor named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 24, 
1993. 

In addition, you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the eleventh day 
of January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
1/28/93 



mommnm 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 6 

ORDERED January 25, 1 993 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy that the Revised Ordinance of the 
City of Quincy, 1976, as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXX. Salaries. Section 151. General Salary 
Classifications and Wage Schedules. 

INSERT THE FOLLOWING, EFFECTIVE UPON PASSAGE: 



TITLE 
Signal 
Maint. 
Helper 



1/28/93 



Start 
450.00 



Rrst Yr.. 
460.00 



Second Yr. 
470.00 



Third Yr. 
480.00 



10 Yrs. 
505.25 



Hancock Lot 

Retail Project 

Drawing Interest 



Cont'd From Page J 

Essentially, the project 
calls for 110,000-square 
feet of new retail space in 
the parking area located 
behind Hancock St. and 
across from the 
Courthouse. 

He has said he hopes 
the new complex would 
attract several well-known 
major retailers, including 
perhaps Toys-R-Us, the 
nation's leading toy seller. 
To make room for the new 
complex, the mayor said 
the project may involve 
razing stores along 
Cottage Ave. and Hancock 
St. which abut the parking 
area. 

Demolishing any 
buildings would have to be 

UEGAt NOTtCE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P0066E1 

Estate of PATRICK D. 

DOHERTY late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 

presented in the above- 

captioned matter praying 

that the last will of said 

decedent be proved and 

allowed and that ANN 

HOLT of QUINCY in the 

County of NORFOLK be 

appointed executrix 

named in the will without 

surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February, 24, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the eleventh day 
of January, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

1/28/93 



part of the accepted bid. If 
that happens, Sheets said 
the city would work with 
owners in the affected 
buildings and help them 
relocate, perhaps into the 
new complex. 

Because of widespread 
local media coverage on 
the project. Sheets said 
the bid deadline was 
extended to Feb. 16 from 
Jan. 25. "We began to get 
more inquiries and people 
were asking for more 
extensive information. It 
(the bid extension 
deadline) was simply done 
to get a higher number of 
quality responses," the 
mayor said. 

After bids are accepted 
Feb. 16, Sheets will 
appoint a committee to 
examine the RFPs. 
Among those who will 
review the bids are 
Bernice Mader, the 
mayor's administrative 
assistant; Public Works 
Commissioner David 
Colton; Traffic Engineer 
Jack Gillon, Meade and 
Charles D'Aprix, the 
executive director of 
Quincy 2000, the public- 
private partnership charged 
with revitalizing the 
downtown. 

After the bids are 
received, the committee 
will compile a "short-list" 
of viable developers and 
interviews will then take 
place, perhaps within a 
month to six weeks, 
depending on the number 
of RFPs. Once that is 
complete, the committee 
will make a 

recommendation to Sheets. 



"We could make a 
recommendation to Mayor 
Sheets within a month. 
It's a priority and we will 
move on it as a top priority 
to get a recommendation 
to the mayor," Meade 
said. 

After a recommendation 
is made, the mayor will 
make a decision on which 
bid to accept. Among the 
factors in the bid selection 
will be cost, size of the 
project, and specifics 
proposed by the developer, 
he said. 

The mayor also said the 
city has two main options 
before the project can 
begin: whether to sell the 
city-owned lot to the 
developer or lease the 
property. Either 

arrangement would need 
the approval of the City 
Council. 

Sheets said he hopes to 
the design work on the 
project is completed by 
the end of the summer. He 
eyes a construction startup 
of fall or next spring. 

"It's going to be fast- 
tracked. I'd like to have a 
design by the end of the 
summer then begin doing 
things. I'd like to see a 
plan that includes 
everything." 

Officials have also 
pledged their cooperation 
with city residents and 
business owners in the 
vicinity of the project area 
if and when construction 
begins. 

"We would want to 
work with them. They will 
be involved," Meade said. 



Mortgagee's Sale of Real Estate on the premises 
QUINCY 
2 Multl-Famlly Homes 
95-97 Copeland Street 
FRIDAY, JAN. 29, 1993, 10:00 AM - REF « 146-93 
2 multi-family homes each with 3, 1 50 + SF of living area. Both 
buildings feature 4 units, each with 1 bdrm & 1 bath. Total of 8 
units located on a .25+ acre corner lot site. Central heat/air. 
TERMS: $10,000 deposit in cash, certified or bank check at 
sale. Balance due in (30) days. Other terms, if any, announced 
atsale. Richard W. Kearney, Esq. 25 Accord Park Dr., Rockland, 
MA 02370, Atty. for Mortgagee. Norfolk Registry District of 
Land Court Certificate 130,719, Book 654, Page 119. 
DIRECTIONS: Furnace Brook Parkway to Copeland Street 

■^Daniel J. 
Flynn & Co,, Ine. 



MA lie *8S8 



AUCTIONEERS 

l-800-<Ht9-0OI8 



REAL ESTATE 

617-770-0444 



,iJ«fAt;:NO|IC|:: 



CITY OF QUINCY 

IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 7 

ORDERED January 25, 1 993 

Be It ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy that the Revised Ordinance of the 

City of Quincy, 1976, as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXX. Salaries. Section 151. General Salary 
Classifications and Wage Schedules. 

INSERT THE FOLLOWING, EFFECTIVE UPON PASSAGE: 



A True Copy 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk of Council 



TITLE Start 

Cemetery 399.17 
Maint. 
Man/Meo 



1/28/93 



First Yr.. 
407.82 



Second Yr. 
416.52 



Third Yr. 
425.21 



10 Yrs. 
447.08 



A True Copy 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk of Council 



Thursday, January 28, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 19 




EVERYBODrS MARKETPIACE 



mmmrmuy 



- i i 



H iiiiiimwwwwiiwiwwwmwmwi 



SERVICES 



W»'<WW'<' t i U< I I I l it 



MODELS 

2 YEARS OLD THRU ADULT. SEEKING 
NEW FACES FOR PROMOTION TO LOCAL 
ADVERTISERS/COMMERCIAL PRODUC- 
ERS NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. DE- 
TAILS & SELECTIONS ATS OR 7PM SHARP 
ON MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1st AT 
SHERATON TARA-BRAINTREE, MA. 1-93, 
Exit 6. MINORS MUST BE WITH LEGAL 
GUARDIAN. 
HIGHLITE MODELING (717) 346-3166 1/28 



FOR RENnr 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Nawly Rsnovatad 
Sons of Italy Social Canter 
Qoldan Lion Suita 
Capacity • 300 
Vanatian Room 
Capacity • 140 
Call 47^S•00 



TF 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Waddlngi, Showars, 

Maatings, Banquets 

Elks Home, 440 E Squantum St. 

Ouinfy 

472-2223 

TE 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Ouincy K of C 

Building 

5 l-lollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-S967 



HALL FOR RENT 

Nickerson Post No. 382 

American Legion, Squantum, MA 

Hanckapped Acoessibto. 

Capacity 90 or less. 

Call 328-8824 
Monday through Saturday 4-7 pm tf 



2 HALLS FOR RENT 

George F. Bryan Post 

1 suitabie for large functions 
(350-1- people); other suited for 
snnall functions (120 people). 
Call the George F. Bryan Post 

Calf 472-6234 m 



WANTED 



HAND TOOLS 
WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tod chests, 
old hand tools, all trades 
(machinist, pattern maker, 
watchmaker, etc.) shop k>ts. 
Also, antiquarian books, 
frames, paintings. Antiques in 
estate lots. 

1-617-558-3839 tf 



HOUSE INSPECTORS 

No Exp. Necessary. Up 

to $800 Wkly. Will Train. 

Ca// (21 9)-769-6649 

EXT H5046 9 A.M. 

to 9 P.M. 7 days 2/11 



NEED HOME-BASED 
SERVICE AGENTS FOR A 

DEBT-FREE INCOME 

SERVICE. NO SELLING. 

LEARN FAST. EARN UP 

TO $500 PER WEEK. CALL 

1-601-226-6305 EXT 1130 T 

2/11 



THANK YOU 
St. Jude 

JTC1/28 



UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 

Change your life, achieve 

financial independence. 

Work at home or office, 

$500^1 ,500 p.t., $2k-$6k f .t. 
No htvm»tm»nt Raquind 
847-0966 V4 



SERVICES 



W»tl Hmlp ami You ORQANBED 

• Tax Purpott 

• Lagol Rings 

• OoMts, CabinMi 

• Moving 




CONTROLLED CHAOS 



471-4445 



2/11 



<^^ Health Insurance 

Cost Effective, Affordable, 

Group Rates for 

the self employed 

Call 617-770-4028 

Underwntlen by PFL Life tns. Co. 1''2 



MOM'S TOUCH 

Cleaning Special 
$29.95^ 

Any Three Rooms 
Homes • Condos • Apts 

Call for details 

ask for Mrs. Hanly 
617-773-4128 
We also offer eve cleaning i/» 




P RQFESSQNAL 

REBMR 
WINDOWS 
&SCREHS6 



SSSUre 



Tii-fni 

v.giMa noma mamimi 



^VUB 



INCOME TAX PREPARATION 

Computer Generated Returns 
James A. Cosseboom 

Bentley Grad 
25+ Years Experience 
My office or your home 
472-6425 *» 



JUST $7.99/HR! 

(PLUS TRIP - $6.50 max.) Win- 
dow, carpet and housedeaning, 
leaf raking, assembly, painting, 
and much more! Joe 773-1084. 
Since 1979. Free Estimates nt 

iMsnytt- ' 

SIESTA SLEEP SHOP 

Mattress Warehouse Bar- 
gains. Rollaway cots, 
trundles, headtraards, etc. 
Opposite Reebok & BJ's 
Routes 139-24 

963-2000 1/28 




EXPERT 

lAMPKMIR 
A REWMMG 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 

B C TILE 

Ceramic fkx>r & wall tile, many 
colors and styles to choose 
from. $6 per foot includes all 

materials and lat>or. 
Ca//(617) 961-1785 1/28 



A&T VACUUM 

•19.95 Overhaul specify on 
any vacuum 

• Smnms machine repairing 

• VCR repairfrig and deaning 
•Sharpening 

(sdssors, knives, elc.) 
•Ored( XL Vacuums $249 

• Eledrolux w/power nozzle 

$198. 

• Used vacuuns $45 & up 

27Beal»St.,Wollaston 
479^066 TF 



A R INSPECTION & 
LEAD PANT REMOVAL 

Doni wait until it is too latel 
Ask us about our Super 
Winter Lead Removal and 
Inspection discount. Let our 
company show you our top 
workmanship quality and 
save you top dollars. Fully 
insured. 

Free Estimates. 
1-800-559-5633 3/11 



SERVICES 





ta 



PRBOStON 

LAMP 

~REfiMR& 

REWRING 



TIMTII 

WOMMCT tLOtma 



Your SoMlh Shore 

Headquarters 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 
MAJOR 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin Si . So Ouincy 

4/2-1710 

TF 



TAX RETURNS 

Very Very Low Rates 

Richard C. McDonough, EA 

Professional Service 

in Your Home 
20 Years Experience 
472-2694 4 - 



CHRISTIAN DATING 

& FRIENDSHIP 

SERVICE 

Free Information packet 
1-800-829-3283 2/4 



HANDYMAN/ELECTRICIAN 

Meet or Beat any price 

Sendee Changes a SJpedalty 

• All Work Guaranteed • No job 

too small • Lbensed & Insured 

(617)479-1319 2/4 



ItMtMMMtttUMtttUtttttttlttMMMtMMmMMttt^ 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TFIIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

DocketNo. gSPOIIOGI 

NOTICE OF 
GUARDIANSHIP 
of MENTALLY ILL 
To THOMAS G. 
O'CONNELL of QUINCY in 
said County and all 
persons interested in the 
estate of THOMAS G. 
O'CONNELL and to the 
Massachusetts 
Department of Mental 
Health, a petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that CORNELIUS E. 
O'CONNELL of QUINCY in 
the county of NORFOLK 
and SHIRLEY W. 
O'CONNELL of QUINCY in 
the county of NORFOLK 
be appointed guardian of 
mentally ill with surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
March 3, 1993. 

WITNESS, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this eighteenth 
day of January, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
R«gl»tM' of Probate 

1/28/93 



nmsALB 



'«W*»WWfW*1 



Cadllac, Eldorado 
1985 

In good condition, 

$3,500 
Ca// 471 -4046 1/28 



® United V«^ 
It hrinK nut the best in all (tf us. 



* 



PRQBMVE 

20 LB. TANK 

EXiHANGE 

$7.99 

wEsroMarcNr 




4?2-f2SO VEKTQUmCt 



GOVERNMENT HOMES 

from $1 (U Repair). Delin- 
quent tax property. Repos- 
sessions. Your area (1 ) 805- 
962-8000 Ext. GH-3019for 
current repo list. 1/28 



Typesetting Equipment 
For Sale 

2 Varityper Compact 351 

with Fonts 

1 Selectline PermaKwik 
Processor 

BEST OFFER 

The Quincy Sun 

1372 Hancock Street 

Quincy 02169 

471-3100 




MAIL TO: THE OUINCY SUN. 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment mutt accompany order. 



INDEX 



a Services 

D For Sale 

□ Autos 
a BoaU 
a For Rent 

□ Wanted 
D Help Wanted 
D Pets, Livestock 
D Lost and Found 

O Real Estate For Sale 

a Real Estate Wanted 

D Mitcellaneous 

O Work Wanted 

D Antiques 

a Coins & Stamos 

a Rati Homes 

a Instruction 

□ Day Care 
D Personal 

D Electrical A Appliances 



RATES 
1WEEK 
S-7WEIKt 

•-12 WEEKS 

19 WEEKS 
OK MORE 



D $5.00foroneinaartlon.upto20worda.10«foreachaddltk)nalword 
D $4.60perlnaartlonupto20wordafor3-7inaertlonao(theaam«ad, 

10« each addlttonal word. 
D $4.30 par inaartton up to 20 words for S-12 inaartiona of the aama ad, 

10< mora each additional word. 
D $4.00 per Inaartlon up to 20 words for 1 3 or more inaartiona of the 

same ad, 10* each additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ — 
In The Ouincy Sun 



Jot the following ad to run 



-weeks 



COPY: 



NO RCFUNO WILL SC MAOf AT THIS CONTIUCT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
DCAOUNE: MONDAY. B.-M P Ji. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMSER IN AO. 



Employees Lobby Council 
To Keep Nursing Home Open 



(Cont'd from Page 3) 

has charge of this now and 



JIMMY JAY MUSIC 



Guaranteed Lowest 

Prices on Cassettes, 

CDs and Records 



690 HANCOCK SL 
WOLLASTON 479-7080 



the city is just one of 
many creditors," McGrath 
said. 

Councillors pledged 
that they would help in 
whatever way they could 
so that employees would 
not lose their jobs and that 



Just Open 

TOBY'S PLACE 

ALL BREED PROFESSIONAL DOG GROOMING 

Most Dogs $20.00 Most Cats $25.00 

IndiKiss: CompMs Grooming, Bsth, FIss and Tick tXp, Nail* 

Cllppwl, E«r* ClMuisd and Lots of TLC. 

Ws also hsvs: Hot Oil Treatmsnts, Msdicatsd Baths, and Organic 

R«a & Tick Control. 

Conveniently located at 441 Quincj Avenue in Braintrte, 

directly across from the Quintree MalL 

Call 849-PETS (7387) 
Spscial: 10% Oft First Grooming wHh this ad 

Hour*: 8-6 Tuss-Sat 10-6 Sun 
Ownsr opsratsd-Trlsha Nsmsc & Mies Byms 



residents would not be 
disrupted. 

"This is causing 
tremendous anxiety among 
residents and employees," 
said Council! cr-at-Large 
Patricia Toland. 

Employees have taken 
pay cuts in the past 
several years to help keep 
the 32-year-old nursing 
home operating. 

"STEVE KAVANAGH 



Toland Leaves Council, 
Seen Asst. City Clerk 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by iMilldlng a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Cont'd From Page 1 

the council's 

Beautification Committee. 

"Beautification of the 
city has always been an 
ongoing interest of mine. I 
love what Mayor Sheets 
has done (Cleaner, 
Greener program) and 
what Mayor McCauley did 
with the Adopt-an-Island 
program," Toland said. 

Mayor James Sheets 
praised Toland, a former 
council colleague, for her 
dedication and service to 
the city. Sheets served 
with her as councillor of 
Ward 4 before being 
elected mayor in 1989. 

"Pat has always been 
sensitive to education and 



O 



HEALTH STOP '" 
BRAINTREE 



Health Stop./Braintree 

759 Granite Street 

Braintree, MA 02184 

(617) 848-1950 



Your Neighborhoo(d Doctor's Office 



COMPLETE FAMILY 
HEALTH SERVICES 

On Site Lab & X-Ray 

Continuing Care for Hypertension, 

Diabetes, Asthma & Allergies 

Minor Emergency Care 

Women's Health Care 



Now Participating in 
Pilgrim Health Care 

and 
Tufts Managed Care 

David Egilman M.D., MPH Board Certified in 
Internal and Preventive/Occupational Medicine 



Mon-Fri 8 am-7 pm • Sat 8 am-1 pm 

No Appointment Necessary 

We submit to Blue Shield, Medicare, 

Medicaid and other major insurance plans 



Quincy Health Stop Patients: 
You may continue your medical care at 

Health Stop/Braintree, 
where your records are now available. 



Save thou^nds 



With South 

Boston 

Savings 

Bank's 

mortgage 

plans. 

Short term mortgages 
enable you to save thousands 
of dollars in interest during 
the lifetime of the mortgage, 
build equity faster, and have 
deductible interest. 

For complete details con- 
tact the mortgage office at 
268-2500 to discuss all your 
mortgage needs. 



handy chart 

makes it simple for 

you to figure out how much you 

can afford for a monthly payment. 



Years 



15 



Annual 
Rate 



im^ 



Annual 

Percentage 

Rafe 



Points 



Amount 
yoii pay 
per SI C 



W 



IpL 



$035 



10 



7iO* 



W 



Int. 



IIIIS 



7 



7J75* 



7£1'» 



314 



PL 



51528 



MAIN OFFICE 

460 West Broadway 
South Boston 
268-2500 

NEPONSET CIRCLE 

740 GallJvan Blvd. 
825-9090 



NORTH QUINCY 

440 Hancock Street 
773-8100 

QUINCY 

690 Adams Street 
Lakin Square 
479-9660 



WEYMOUTH 

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things of beauty in our 
city, whether she was 
serving on the school 
committee, working with 
her on the council or 
working with her as mayor. 

"She has embodied the 
spirit of what makes 
Quincy great. She will be 
missed as an elected 
pubUc official." 

Toland has also been 
praised for her work as 
chairman of the council's 
Finance Committee. 
Council President Charles 
Phelan announced that he 
will appoint vice-chairman 
Timothy Cahill as new 
chairman. 

Toland said the poor 
economy in recent years 
has made some aspects of 
her council job unpleasant. 

"It's very hard every 
time you vote on the tax 
rate... We've had to put a 
sewer-water tax on people 
aiKl nobody enjoys doing 
that," she said. "It's 
difficult for people and we 
realize that. When you're 
hitting people in the 
pocketbook... that's hard. 
But bills have to be paid 
and we have to make the 
tough votes sometimes." 

There has been much 



speculation on who the 
City Council might choose 
to succeed Toland. 
However, the seat may be 
left open. 

Both Councillors Peter 
Kolson and Cahill agreed 
that the seat may be left 
open until the election in 
November. Both men said 
it is not as important to fill 
an at-large seat as it is a 
ward seat. 

"We may leave it open. 
If we were to vote, as of 
now I'd vote for the fourth 
runner up (from the last 
election), " Cahill said. 

"If it were a ward seat 
you would have to fill it," 
Kolson said. "But an at- 
large seat, that's a 
different story." 

Former mayor and 
councillor-at-large Joseph 
LaRaia finished fourth in 
the last election. 

Kolson said he 
understands LaRaia has 
called all the city 
councillors to express his 
interest in the seat. Kolson 
said others interested are 
Ron lacobucci and Denis 
Tardo, both unsuccessful 
candidates in the past. 



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VOL. 25 No. 20 



Thursday, February 4, 1993 




''(/{jW 



30$ 




Would Bring Rates In 
Line With Cost Of Living 

Sheets, MWRA 

Devise Plan For 

Cutting Sewer Rates 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

A four-pronged "strategy" plan intended to dramatically reduce rising sewer 
rates by reducing MWRA spending and increasing federal and state revenue for 
the multi-billion dollar Boston Harbor cleanup has been devised by Mayor James 
Sheets and Authority Director Doug MacDonald. 

Sheets said he and Milwaukee. Houston, 



SNOW SURFER--Dan Mahoney, 7, of Quincy, does some sledding in Squantum after 
snow fell on the city earlier this week. The snow dosed Quincy public schools on 
Monday and Tuesday. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Christina Conley) 



MacDonald developed the 
"rate relief strategy" in an 
effort to stop the rising 
sewer rates and bring them 
more in line with the cost 
of living. According to 
figures furnished by the 
MWRA, Boston can claim 
the dubious distinction of 
having the country's 
highest sewer rates. 

In fact, the average 
sewer bill for a family of 
four in Boston, which like 
Quincy is in the MWRA 
district, has soared to $587 
last year from $180 in 
1986, the first ftiU year of 
the $7 billion cleanup. 

Eight years ago, Boston 
ranked 14th in water and 
sewer costs, behind 
Honolulu and ahead of 



which had the highest 
sewer bills in 1986, has 
the second highest rates 
today. 

The MWRA services 
2.5 million costumers. 

Without relief, the 
MWRA projects sewer 
rates will climb 24.3 
percent or $140 this year, 
raising the bill to $727 for 
an average four-person 
family. Officials also 
project a 31.7 percent hike 
for 1995 which would add 
$225, bringing the total 
bill to $952. 

According to the 
figures, ratepayers in the 
44 communities receiving 
MWRA sewer service 
have funded 92 percent of 
the cleanup's cost to date 



while the federal and state 
government have pitched 
in just eight percent. To 
illustrate the unfair local 
burden to fund the 
cleanup, officials 
compared that funding 
formula to the Central 
Artery project which has 
an 87 percent federal and 
13 percent state split. 

There are four parts to 
the strategy plan. They 
are: 

• Manage MWRA 
spending 

•Increase Federal 
Funding for Clean Water 
Act and Safe Drinking 
Water Act Mandates. 

•Obtain state debt 
service assistance. 

(Cont'd on Page 5) 



4 New Classrooms At Board Seeks Ordinance 
Bernazzani In Fall On Ad Book Solicitations 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

If aU goes according to 
plan, students at the 
Bernazzani School will be 
welcomed back next 
September to a building 
with four new classrooms. 

Superintendent of 
Schools Eugene Creedon 
updated the City Council 
on plans for the school's 
addition and on 
construction plans for the 
Early Childhood Center at 
the site of the former 
Lincoln School. About 25 
parents attended Monday's 
meeting. 

Thomas Koch, 

executive secretary to 
Mayor James Sheets, said 
the mayor should have a 
bond proposal ready within 
^ the next four weeks to fund 
the projects. 

Creedon said an 
architect has already been 
selected. He said the 
addition at the 
overcrowded Bernazzani 
School will be brick and 
will be air conditioned so 
that it may be used during 
the summer. 

"What if catastrophe 
strikes. Obviously we're 
cutting it very close," said 
Councillor-at-Large 
Timothy Cahill, also a 
parent of Bernazzani 
students. "We need 



something we can point to 
in September." 

If the project is delayed 
or halted, Creedon said 
contingency plans will be 
put in effect. Whether or 
not students are moved to 
another school will depend 
on the length of the delay 
and other circumstances, 
he said. 

"We will work with 
parents closely and ask 
what they want," Creedon 
said. 

Creedon said the 
addition to the former 
Furnace Brook School is 
long overdue. 

"The Bernazzani was 
inadequate since the day it 
was built," he said. 

Creedon said the Early 
Childhood Center will 
likely not be ready for the 
opening of school in 
September, but if work 
goes according to plan it 
will be open by the fall. 

Because it is 
construction of a 
completely new building it 
wiU take longer, Creedon 
said. 

"But there are no 



obstructions at the site so 
there should be good 
progress in construction," 
he said. 

The new school will 
feature classroom space, a 
multi-purpose room (gym, 
auditorium, etc.), a 
"Discovery Room" where 
children experience 
"hands-on" learning, a 
community room for local 
groups, and administrative, 
storage and custodial 
space. 

The school yard will 
include parking for 35 cars 
and a playground geared 
toward young children. 

The school will be for 
children ages pre-school 
through first grade. 

"We hope to use the 
Early Childhood Center 
year round," Creedon said. 
The students who attend 
the ECC will not be 
inconvenienced if the 
building is not ready for 
the start of school, 
Creedon said. Those 
students would simply 
remain at the locations 
where their particular 
classes are held now. 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

The Quincy License 
Board is planning to 
contact City Solicitor 
Stephen McGrath about 
the possibility of 
establishing a new 
ordinance to give the city 
more control over ad book 
solicitations. 

The matter was 
discussed at Tuesday's 
board meeting because of 
Fire Chief Thomas 
Gorman's growing concern 
over the matter. 

"People are getting 
burned by these bogus type 
of operations," said 
Gorman. "These outfits 
overpressure people, then 



they promise the world and 
they don't deUver." 

PoUce Capt. Frederick 
Laracy, sitting in for 
Police Chief Francis 
Mullen, said most of the 
ad book solicitations are 
done "via the phone" by 
individuals who 

misrepresent themselves 
by saying they are from a 
certain organization or 
charity. 

"I've received a lot of 
calls," said Laracy. 
"People have been 
complaining about this for 
a long time now." 

Laracy added that while 
some organizations, such 
as Quincy Mutual Aid and 
the Quincy Patrolmen's 



Union have run legitimate 
ad book campaigns, many 
others are not so honest 

"This should be referred 
to the city solicitor," he 
said. "I'd like to see an 
ordinance drawn up that 
would give us some sort of 
control over these callers, 
so that we can get their 
names and enough 
information to do a 
background check--a 
reference-type thing." 

The board agreed that 
McGrath would be 
contacted on the matter. 

Attempts to reach 
McGrath Tuesday 
afternoon by phone were 
unsuccessful. 



DeCristofaro Urges 
Fence At Fore River 



Safety 
Bridge 



Special Education Meeting Feb. 11 

The Special Education 
Sub Committee of the 
Quincy School Committee 
will meet Thursday, Feb. 



11 at 7:30 p.m. at Quincy 
High School. 

Meetings are open to 
the public. 



Ward 2 Councillor 
Theodore DeCristofaro has 
written to Massachusetts 
Department of Public 
Works Commissioner 
James Kerasiotes 
regarding the installation 
of a safety fence on the 
Fore River Bridge. 

DeCristofaro 's concern 
stems from two recent 
suicide attempts by 
individuals who jumped 



from the bridge, one of 
which resulted in a 
fatality, according to the 
letter DeCristofaro sent 
Tuesday to Kerasiotes. 

"In the interest of 
pubUc safety, I am asking 
your kind assistance in 
having your department 
investigate the installation 
of a safety fence to 
prevent this type of 
situation as this has 



happened at various times 
in the past," the letter 
stated. "Also, young 
people seem to find it a 
challenge to jump from the 
bridge during the summer 
months." 

An 84-year-old Quincy 
man died in late 
December after jumping 
from the bridge. A siniihar 
such attempt by a second 
resident was unsuccessful. 
-■MICHAEL WHALEN 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 4, 1993 



Fabrizio Seeks Federal Input 
On West Quincy Tower 



Ward 4 City Councillor 
Thomas Fabrizio said he 
will ask federal officials to 
investigate issues 
conce rning the 

controversial 700-ft. tower 
which was recently 
erected in West Quincy. 

Fabrizio introduced a 
resolve to the City Council 
Monday asking the 
Council to petition 
Congressman Gerry Studds 
and Senators John Kerry 
and Edward Kennedy to 



answer neighborhood 
concerns about the height 
of the tower. 

Neighbors are upset 
about the possible impact 

of the telecommunications 
tower on their health and 
local property values. 

Fabrizio said the 
Federal Aviation 

Administration has 
authority over air traffic 
related to Logan Airport 
and the Federal 
Communications 










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Commission governs 
communication issues. 

The owner of the tower, 
Frank DiRico of Quincy, 
said he plans to put 
antennas and microwave 
dishes on the tower. 

The Conservation 
Commission made an on- 
site inspection of the tower 
Saturday but found no 
violations. 

Fabrizio said DiRico 
will need permission from 
the state before he can 
begin attaching 

communications equip- 
ment to the tower. 

"STEVE KAVANAGH 

McConville 
Honored By 

City Council 

Joseph McConville 
received a commendation 
from the Quincy City 
Council last week in honor 
of his service as a 
volunteer member and 
chairman of the Planning 
Board. 

McConville, of 
Chickatobat Road, 
Merrymount, recently 
retired after 10 years of 
service. 

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Garden Cafe Plans 
1,800 S.F. Expansion 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

The Quincy License 
Board Tuesday continued 
for one week a request 
from The Garden Cafe, 
653 Southern Artery, for 
permission to expand its 
premises from 4,000 to 
5,800 square feet. 

Atty. Howard Wayne 
told the board the 
expansion would mean 
new restrooms, an 
extension of the existing 
kitchen, and the addition 
of "about 30" seats in the 
restaurant, which currently 
seats 120. 

Wayne added that since 
restaurant president Donna 
Buccheri and her family 
first took over the former 
Roman Gardens in May 



1992, additions to the 
menu and other changes 
have been made to create 
"a really nice family 
restaurant." 

"The restaurant has 
been well-operated in hard 
economic times," said 
Wayne. 

City Clerk Joseph Shea 
said Ward 2 Councillor 
Theodore DeCristofaro, 
who was unable to attend 
the meeting, had "one or 
two questions" on the 
available parking at the 
site but was otherwise 
"quite positive" about the 
expansion. 

Police Capt. Frederick 
Laracy, sitting in for 
Police Chief Francis 
Mullen, also questioned 



the parking procedures at 
the restaurant, saying that 
the parking signs at the 
restaurant should be made 
larger so that it is clear to 
patrons exactly where they 
can park their cars. 

Shea noted that 
because of the board's new 
rule which requires all 
petitions having to do with 
liquor to be reviewed 
twice, the matter would 
have to be continued for 
one week. 

Building Inspector 
Matthias Mulvey said both 
he and DeCristofaro would 
meet with Wayne to 
discuss the parking and 
signage at the restaurant 
before the board's next 
meeting. 



City To Repair Seawalls 
In Merrymount, Adams Sliore 



Waterfront residents in 
the Narragansett Road 
area are hoping that 
another bad storm does not 
occur while they wait for 
the seawaU to be repaired 
along the Merrymount 
shore. 

Neighborhood homes 
were flooded again during 
December's storm just a 
little more than a year 
after being hit by the 
October 1991 "no-name" 
storm and Hurricane Bob 
in August 1991. 

DPW Commissioner 
David Colton has 
submitted a $373,000 
proposal to begin repairing 
the seawalls along 



Narragansett Road; 
Sbellton Road in Adams 
Shore and Shore Avenue 
in Merrymount. 

Colton said the city is 
eligible to be reimbursed 
about $300,000 including 
75 percent from the 
Federal Emergency 
Management Agency and 
12-1/2 percent from the 
state of Massachusetts. 
However, the federal 
assistance is not 
guaranteed. , , 

The height of the 
seawall at Narragansett 
will be raised from 11-1/2 
feet to 13 feet, Colton 
said. He also said the 



present granite block wall 
would be replaced by a 
concrete wall. The cost 
would be $25,000 

Work on the project 
could not start until March 
at the earliest. The 
construction and repairs 
are exjjected to take three 
months to complete. The 
City Council is expected 
to approve the project at 
its Feb. 16 meeting. 

If the city receives the 
maximum reimbursement 
the total cost to the city 
will be $72,852. This 
amount includes $5,000 to 
hire a research consultant. 

"STEVE KAVANAGH 



Council Re-elects Three 
To Park And Recreation Board 



The City Council re- 
elected three members to 
the Park and Recreation 
Board Monday. 

Gerard Coletta, Jr., 
Kathleen Mitchell and 
School Committee 
member Frank Santoro 
were returned to the board 



for another term. 

The Park and 
Recreation Board governs 
the direction of Park 
Department facilities and 
Recreation Department 
programs. 

The nine-member, 
volunteer board meets the 



first Monday of each 
month at 6:30 p.m. at the 
Richard J. Koch Family 

Park and Recreation 
Complex, 100 Southern 
Artery. 



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Support Solid For 
Toland As Asst. Clerk 



Thursday, February 4, 1993 Qnincy Sun Page 3 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

Support remains solid 
for the appointment of 
former City Councillor 
Patricia Toland following 
a heated discussion at 
Monday's Council meeting 
concerning the vacant 
assistant city cleric job. 

City Clerk Joseph Shea 
is expected to nominate 
Toland for the job at the 
March 1 City Council 
meeting. 

A proposal by 
Councillor-at-Large 
Michael Cheney to make 
the assistant cleric's job a 
part-time position died 
when no other councillor 
would second the motion. 

Cheney then said it 
could be illegal for the 
Council to vote on the 
appointment of Toland to 
the job. 

He said Toland violated 
a State Ethics Commission 
ruling by asking 
councillors to consider her 
for the assistant clerk job 
while she was still a City 
Councillor. 

The Ethics Commission 
prohibits lobbying or 
informal lobbying of 
elected officials or use of 
position for personal gain. 

However, City Solicitor 
Steve McGrath said the 
Ethics rule concerning 
informal lobbying "is in 
the context as a counciUor 
in a meeting" and does not 
apply to Toland. 

McGrath said he has 
asked for and received a 
specifi,c opinion in regard 
to Toland seeking the job. 

"The report basically 
states that Councillor 
Toland can't be nominated 
for the job until she has 
been out of office 30 days 
and that while in office 
she can have no 
participation on related 
issues," McGrath said. 

He noted that Toland 
abstained last fall from a 
vote promoting Shea from 
assistant cleric to clerk. 



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"I don't think making 
her candidacy (for the job) 
known is a use of her 
position," McGrath added. 

But Cheney said the 
way he interprets the rule 
Toland is in violation. 

"Did she ask you 
(Councillors) for a vote? 
Yes. This says it's illegal," 
Cheney said. 

The Council voted to 
have McGrath draft an 
opinion on whether the 
Council may legally vote 
on appointing Toland. 

"Pat Toland has done 
nothing illegal, immoral or 
inappropriate. We 
shouldn't be dragging her 
name through the mud or 
hold her to a different 
standard," said Councillor- 
at-Large Timothy Cahill. 

"Do we need the 
position? The position is 
useful and Toland is 
qualified," CahiU said. "I 
don't need a ruling from 
the Ethics Commission to 
tell me what I'm doing is 
right 

"We are making a 
mountain out of a molehill 
and it's political," Cahill 
said. 

Cheney said he wanted 
to abolish or reduce the 
position last year before 
the names of potential 
candidates were involved. 

"Before a name is 
thrown out there, let's 
discuss it. I said that time 
and time again," Cheney 
said. "What's happened 
now is exactly what I 
didn't want to happen... a 
name has emerged. And 



it's a colleague. 

"It's not politically in 
my favor to be doing this... 
it's a matter of principle," 
Cheney said. 

"The job has been made 
much easier through 
automation (computer- 
ization) and we have also 
recodified city ordinances 
making the clerk's job 
much easier," Cheney 
said. 

The assistant clerk's 
salary pays more than 
$31,000 and Cheney said 
benefits make it worth 
about $39,000. 

"We have a 

responsibility to look at 
every position (to possibly 
cut)," Cheney said. 

"I think the job is 
needed," said Ward 3 
Councillor Larry Chretien. 
"I've spoken to the clerk in 
detail about the job." 

Chretien said there was 
no call for cutting the 
assistant clerk's job when 
Shea was elected by a 9-0 
vote in March 1991. 

"When we voted for Joe 
Shea, 9-0, we decided the 
position was necessary," 
Chretien said. He added 
that it would be unfair to 
abolish or reduce the job 
without Shea having a 
chance to justify the 
position. 

Ward 4 Councillor 
Thomas Fabrizio agreed. 

"Mr. Shea should have 
the opportunity to discuss 
the job as any other 
department head does," 
Fabrizio said. 



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THE BOSTON FIVE recently made a corporate contribution to Quincy Neighborhood 
Housing Services. Elspeth Brown, second from right, manager of The Boston Five's 
Quincy branch offices and Mary O. Collins (far right), a Boston Five loan officer, 
present the donation to Quincy NHS' Executive Director Normand Grenier (second 
from left) and Construction Specialist Butch Barbed (far left). 

QNHS is a community-based partnership of neighborhood residents, lending institutions 
and city officials. The Boston Five's donation will assist QNHS in its mission to preserve, 
improve and expand the supply of affordable housing in Quincy's low and moderate 
income neighborhoods. The group's efforts include the rehabilitation of homes such as 
this two-family house on Arlington St. 



Toland Council Seat 
To Be Filled March 1 



City Councillors agreed 
Monday to fill Patricia 
Toland's vacant at-large 
seat during the March 1 
Council meeting. 

Toland resigned Jan. 26 
following more than 11 
years on the Council. 

Former Mayor and City 
Councillor Joseph LaRaia 
is considered by some 
councillors to be the 
leading candidate for the 
job. LaRaia was runnerup, 
finishing fourth, in the 
1991 Councillor-at-Large 
race. He also lost a bid for 



mayor in the 1989 primary 
and lost a close election to 
Francis McCauley in the 
1987 mayoral race. 



grabs this fall when 
Quincy voters go to the 

polls. Races for all City 
Council seats and for 



The seat will be up for mayor are scheduled. 



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770-2182 



335-6383 



o 



o 



PICTURE 
FRAME SALE! 



Aluminum Picture i 
Framing Special ] 

^39^^ ($85 value) | 




• Up to 24x36 

• Regular Glass 

• 50 Colors 
Good with Incoming order only 

Exp. 2/28/93. Limit 2 per customer* 



• Dry Mounted 

• Ready to Hang 

• No Subitutions 



I 



20% off Custom or 

Ready Made Frames 

or DO'It'YourselJ 

Frame Kit 

Labor, Mounting, 

Custom Matting, 

Glass & Fitting Included 



, Exp. 2/28/93. Limit 2 per customer* 



FRANTIC FRAMERS 

1592 Hancock St., Quincy 

1-800-464-3726 617-479-4352 

"We are your everyday discount art store! Not bigger but better!" 




THE QUALITY 
CONSIGNMENT SHOP 

66 BILLINGS RD. N. QUINCY 
328-1179 

Where the smart people shop! 

The Slash is Back! 

Encore's Wonderful, Would you believe 



/ 



SO % offSdel 

is now in progress 

Tickets marked with a red slash are fifty percent off 

our already ridiculously low prices! 

STORE HOURS CONSIGNMENT HOURS 

TUES. THRU SAT. WED.-AND SAT. 

10:00-5:00 10:00-2:00 



I 



Page 4 Qulncy Sun Thursday, February 4, 1993 



I 



Loar 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Ouincy Sun Publishing Co . Inc 

1372 Hancock St , Quincy Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworth Jr Publisher 
Robert H Bosworlh Editor 



30t p«r copy. $12.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$14.00 par yaar by mail outside Quincy. $17.00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 47l-3i02 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St Quincy Mass 02169 



Tne Quinc/ Sun assumes nc financial responsib.iiiy tof 
lypographica' errors in tCvenisements but will repnnl iMai 
pan of an attven serrenl in which the typographical error 
occurs 



'SieJ^- 



Health Clinic Day 
Feb. 16 For Veterans 



Quincy Veterans 
Services, in conjunction 
with the South Shore 
Visiting Nurses 

Association, will present a 
Health Clinic Day, 
Tuesday, Feb. 16 from 
9:30 a-m. to 2:30 p.m. at 
the George F. Bryan VFW 
Post, 24 Broad St. 

The free service is open 
to veterans and their 
spouses and spouses of 
deceased veterans. A 
military discharge must be 
shown. 

The clinic will feature 
representatives from the 
American Heart 

Association and teams 
from the American Cancer 
Society, Quincy Eye 
Health Services and a 



medical team from the 
U.S. Army (Ft. Devens) to 
do blood pressure and a 
cholesterol check for those 
attending. 

There will also be a 
Mobile Diagnostics Inc. 
vehicle on hand to offer 
mammogram testing. Call 
235-6655 for an 
appointment and 

information. 

CVS Pharmacy of 
Wollaston will send a 
representative to check old 
prescriptions and answer 
questions regarding 
medications. 

For information call the 
Quincy Veterans Services 
Dept., Henry Bradley, Pat 
Healy or Bob LaReur, 
376-1192. 



DeCristofaro Schedules 
City Hall Office Hours 

Ward 2 Councillor Hall, 1305 Hancock St. 



Theodore DeCristofaro 
announces that he will be 
holding "office hours" 
Mondays through Fridays 
from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at 
the City Council Office in 
the second floor of City 



Any constituents 
wishing to contact the 
councillor or make an 
appointment to see him 
can call the office at 376- 
1341. 



QHS Parent Advisory Meeting 



Quincy High School 
Parent Advisory Council 

will meet Tuesday, Feb. 9 



at 7:15 p.m. in the QHS 
Pride Room. 

All parents and teachers 
are welcome to attend. 



Medically 
Speaking 



by Michael M. Bakerman, M.D., FA.C.C. 




YOUR RISK OF HAVING A STROKE 



More than half a million 
people a year suffer a 
stroke in the United States. 
Are you a prime candidate 
to join their ranks? Risk 
factors include high blood 
pressure, heart disease, 
diabetes, family history, 
and being over age 65. 
Among the personal hab- 
its that magnify those risk 
factors are alcohol or co- 
caine abuse, smoking, a 
sedenteiry lifestyle, and a 
diet high in fat and cho- 
lesterol. Prompt medical 
attention is essential to 
recovery of a stroke. Seek 
help fast if you notice any 
of these warning signs: 
sudden weakness or 
numbness of the face, arm 
or leg on one side ; difficulty 
speaking or understanding 
speech ; dimness or loss of 
vision; or sudden memory 



loss or confusion. 
P.S. Stroke is the third 
leading cause of death 
among Americans, after 
heart attacks and cancer. 
Although none of us 
can exert absolute control 
over our health, lifestyle 
changes we all can make, 
such as eating more 
healthfully, exercising 
regularly, and quitting 
smoking today, can really 
make a difference. If you 
would like to learn more 
about this topic, or about 
how you can modify your 
lifestyle to help ward off 
heart disease, call COM- 
PREHENSIVE CARDIAC 
CARE at 472-2550. Office 
hours are by appointment 
at 101 Adams St., Suite 
24, in Quincy. I am affili- 
ated with Quincy Hospital 
and South Shore Hospi- 
tals. 




Sunbeams 

F3y Henry Bosworth 



IPs, And's, And But's 




At this early stage. Election Year '93 is marked 
with a number of political iTs and's and hut's 
that could make it either an interesting or ho- 
hum one. 
There's quite a few potential candidates in the wings 
waiting for things to get sorted out before deciding 
whether or not to hit the campaign trail this year. 

One big if, of course, is Councillor Tim Cahill. If he 
decides to challenge Mayor James 
Sheets, that will have a ripple effect 
opening up both council at -large and 
ward races. 

Cahill is still giving it serious 
thought and will make his decision 
this month. If he should run for mayor cahill 
he would vacate his council at-large seat. 

That would make two open at-large seats, as Patricia 
Toland has resigned to seek the assistant city clerk's 
post. 

Even if the council fills the Toland vacancy, it 
technically will still be an open seat come election 
time. 

Whoever is named will complete the Toland term 
but then would have to run for the seat in the fall 
election without an incumbent status to keep it. Of 
course, occupying a seat is an advantage in an election, 
incumbent or not. 

Former Mayor-Councillor Joseph LaRaia appears 
to have enough votes in the council to 
succeed Toland mainly because he 
was runner-up in the last election. 




But there is still some feeling 
the Toland seat should be kept open to 

LaRAM let the voters fill it in the fall. 

City Council President Charles Phelan reportedly 
has just about decided to nm at-large 
this year regardless of what Cahill 
decides. 

Phelan plans to support LaRaia' s 
appointment to the Toland seat. But if 
LaRaia gets it and decides to run in the 
fall to keep it, he apparently is going to phelan 
find himself up against Phelan who would be a strong 




contender. 

Other potential at-large candidates include: 
Ward 3 Councillor Larry Chretien and Ward 4 
Councillor Tom Fabrizio, former School Committee- 
woman Mary Collins, past candidate George Miller, 
businessman Anthony Agnitti, Charles Mclntyre, son 
of the late Mayor-Senator James Mclntyre and Richard 
Barry, son of the late former Councillor Richard Barry. 
If there are two open at-large seats, you might see 
most of these potential candidates making a run. 

If there is only one seal open, that would thin out the 
field. 

If there are two open at-large seats and both Chretien 
and Fabrizio run, it would mean three open ward seats 
if Phelan vacates the Ward 5 seat to run at-large. 

Potential Ward 5 contenders include Michelle Lydon, 
daughter of former Councillor Jack Lydon; Michael 
Cronin, Sean Barry, Kevin Burke and Lynne Houghton, 
Wollaston realtor. 

Potential Ward 3 candidates include Howard 
MacKay, who has run before, restaurateur Mike 
McFarland, and Brian Mahoney, administrative as- 
sistant in Dist. Atty. William Delahunt's office. 

No speculation, at this point, about potential can- 
didates in Wards 1, 2, 4, and 6. 

Stay timed. 

a 

UNCLE SAM ROUNSEVILLE, back from the 
President Clinton inaugiu-al says he 
was amazed at the number of Quincy 
people he bimaped into. 

"Hey Uncle Sam!", one called out 
and Rounseville timied around to see 
Mayor James Sheets. 

Rounseville got to meet a few more 
celebrities who enjoyed having their picture taken with 
him. Among them: 

Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown, who he met at 
a ball, actor Jack Palance with whom he sat at the 
inaugural, model Christie Brinkley and Jack The 
Bulldog, Georgetown University's mascot. 

Rounseville says that for most of the Democrats it 
was the most exciting inaugural since that of John F. 
Kennedy in 1961. 




UNCLE SAM 



Reader's Forum 



Public Demand Of CTB Treaty 'Vital' 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
Most Americans are 
unaware that for the first 
time in years, the United 
States is not testing 
nuclear weapons. 

In October of 1992 
President Bush signed a 
law that included a nine 
month moratorium on 
nuclear weapons testing 
known as the 

Comprehensive Test Ban 
(CTB) Treaty. We have an 
unprecedented opportunity 



to declare a permanent 
ban for all time. 

The cold war is over. 
We recently signed the 
START treaty to destroy 
nuclear weapons and a 
treaty to ban chemical 
weapons. The major threat 
today is the sale and 
proliferation of nuclear 
weapons and its 
technology to unstable 
non-nuclear countries. 
Without our moratorium 
Russia would have 
resumed its testing 



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program. France 

independently ceased 
testing in April 1992. At 
the present time no 
country is testing its 
weapons. 

In 1968, as a response 
to the threat of other 
countries acquiring the 
means to develop nuclear 
bombs the non- 
proliferation treaty was 
signed by over 100 
countries in the United 
Nations. This treaty is 
coming up for renewal in 
1995. Its ratification is 
dependent of the signing of 
a Comprehensive Test Ban 
Treaty. 

The critical importance 
of this effort has been 
highlighted by the 
International Physicians 
for the Prevention of 
Nuclear War (IPPNW). 
They have repeatedly 
called attention to the 
threat of nuclear weapons 



production, particularly the 
environmental and health 
hazards. 

As social workers 
dealing with societal 
issues such as 
homelessness, child abuse 
and lack of necessary 
support services we are 
appalled by the cost of 
each nuclear explosion 
ranging fi-om $20 million 
to $70 million. The 
operating budget for one 
nuclear weapons lab is ^7 
billion. 

President Clinton has 
expressed his interest in 
promoting the CTB. It was 
massive public pressure 
that produced the Partial 
Test Ban Treaty of 1963. It 
is vital that the public now 
demand a Comprehensive 
Test Ban Treaty. 

Louise Lown and 
Rohna Shod 
National Assa of 
Social Workers 
Boston 



Sheets, MWRA Devise Plan 
For Cutting Sewer Rates 



Cont'd From Page 1 

•Fund a new aqueduct 
with state assistance. 

To manage MWRA 
spending, Sheets said 
MacDonald has proposed 
to slash the cleanup 
budget from $7 billion to 
$5.7 bilhon over the next 
six years. 

The Advisory Board is 
currently conducting a 
thorough independent 
review of both the 
MWRA's current expense 
budget and three-year 
Capital Improvement 
Program. The proposed 
capital budget is already 
$446 million less than the 
last three-year spending 
plan, Sheets noted. 

To increase federal 
funding for Clean Water 
Act and Safe Drinking 
Water Act Mandates, 
Sheets said $200 milUon 
in grant funding will be 
targeted for the cleanup 

project in the Fy94 budget 
appropriation process. The 
officials also said there is 
a need for long-term 
financing for clean water 
projects through new 
Clean Water and Safe 
Drinking Water Act grant 
programs, and at least one 
third of any new economic 
stimulus package for water 
infrastructure projects. 

Sheets met with Sen. 
Ted Kermedy Monday to 
discuss this option which 
the mayor called the 
"immediate strategy" 
because President Clinton 
is expected to submit the 
federal government's FY94 
budget to Congress by the 
end of the month. 

Currently, the federal 
govenunent kicks in $100 
million for the cleanup. 
Officials want to see that 
amount doubled this year 
to fund additional capital 
projects beginning in 1996, 
1997 and 1998. The 
additional money, if 
approved this year, would 
not kick in until 1995, 



Sheets noted. 

The key to immediate 
rate relief. Sheets and 
MacDonald say, is state 
debt service assistance 
which could be applied 
directly toward offsetting 
the ratepayers' costs of 
capital borrowing for water 
and sewer projects. 

Legislation has been 
filed for the 1993 session 
to provide the funding for 
MWRA projects and 
others throughout the state. 
The MWRA wants the 
state to provide $25 
million in FY94 which 
begins July 1, $30 million 
in FY95, and $40 million 
in FY96. 

Sheets said a $25 
milhon state appropriation 
this year, coupled with a 
cut in MWRA spending, 
could reduce this year's 
projected rate hike from 
24.3 percent to 5 to 9 
percent. 

Ideally, the mayor said 
he would want rates to 
"flatten out" and not be 
subject to any increases. 
Realistically, he said he 
believes the best scenario 
would be if sewer bills 
cUmbed the same rate as 
inflation or cost of living 
adjustment. 

"I think we would hope 
to have the rates go up 
only at the cost of living. 
Our realistic goal is to 
have the rates not exceed 
the normal cost of living 
adjustment. Ideally, we 
would like the rates to be 
lower than that if possible, 
but nothing more than 
three or four percent. 

"Cost of living is the 
goal." 

To do that, Sheets said 
the MWRA Advisory 
Board and Board of 
Directors would have to 
cut operations and capital 
outlay even more than the 
Authority is presently 
planning. The state would 
also have to agree to 
annual appropriations for 



debt service which Sheets 
said could be biggest 
obstacle. 

"We have no illusions 
about the battle. The 
effort at the federal level 
is already underway and 
the state piece is going to 
require organization across 
the district including 
selectmen, councillors and 
mayors." 

In the past, efforts to 
assist ratepayers at the 
state level have been 
foiled by non-MWRA 
district legislators. The 
mayor said any effort to 
acquire state funding for 
the cleanup project must 
include support from 
legislators outside the 
district. 

And, even if the House 
and Senate approve an 
appropriation, the measure 
could be vetoed by Gov. 
Weld. Thus, the key may 
be how many non-district 
legislators support the 
funding. A gubernatorial 
veto would need a two- 
thirds vote in the House 
and Senate to be 
overridden. 

Sheets, who calls 
himself the "catalyst" in 
the state-wide organization 
effort, said the strategy has 
already been endorsed by 
some instnmiental federal 
and state officials, 
including Sen. Kennedy, 
Congressmen Barney 
Frank, Joseph Kennedy, 
Edward Markey, Joseph 
Moakley and Gerry 
Studds, as well as Boston 



Mayor Ray Flynn. He 
hopes others join the 
effort, such as ratepayers 
and business organizations. 

With a new 

administration in 
Washington and a 
cooperative MWRA, 
Sheets said there is a six 
to nine month "window of 
opportunity" to bring rate 
relief. Only through a 
well-organized, grass 
routes effort can relief be 
reaUzed, be added. 

"We have to organize it 
and it has to be 
reasonable. I think our 
plan is reasonable. 
Everyone is pulling the 
wagon in the same 
direction." 

The fourth prong of the 
strategy calls for the state 
to fund at least 75 percent 
of the construction of a 
second aqueduct starting 
in FY95. Greater Boston 
is one of the only 
metropolitan areas in the 
country with a single 
major supply of potable 
water--the Hultman 
Aqueduct. 

A vital, but expensive, 
new turuiel is currently 
planned to provide 
redundant service. 
Officials say a second 
aqueduct is "an essential 
economic life insurance 
policy for all of 
Massachusetts." 

Sheets said state 
funding is necessary for 
the project to head off 
rising water bill rates. 



Atlantic Neighborhood 
Assn. Meeting Feb. 10 

Center, 12 Hunt St. 

Guest speaker Ed 
Tidewell will discuss the 
Travel Qub planning a trip 
or cruise. 

Parker PTO Meeting Feb. 10 

Parker School FFO will All parents are invited, 

meet Wednesday, Feb. 10 For more information call 
at 7:30 p.m. in the Media 

Center at the school. 773-0639. 



The Atlantic 

Neighborhood Association 
will meet Wednesday, 
Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Atlantic Neighborhood 



Tell Us Where 
It Hurts. 



Thursday, February 4, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 5 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 



The next time you wonder v^hether 
it's a strain or a sprain, whether it 
needs stitches, or whether you need 
a doctor, call ASK-A-NURSE® 
Our registered nurses can 
recommend doctors and community 
health care services, even explain 



basic first aid. Last but not least, they 
can lend a sympathetic, knowledge- 
able ear any time of the day or night. 

So the next time you're jivonder- 
ing what to do, call 
ASK-AtNURSE. It 
doesn't hurt to ask. 




South Shore 
Hospital 



1-800-544-2424 

A free service sponsored by South Shore Hospital 
and 18 other leading area hospitals. 



1992 Access Heahh Marketing, Inc. ASK-A-hOJRSE is a legblered trademark at Access Health Marketing, Inc 



Feb. 4-10 

1938 

55 Years Ago 



Gertrude Halloran 

First Quincy 

Woman Judge 

Gertrude R. Halloran was officially seated as the first 
woman justice in the history of Quincy District Court and 
easily handled her first case involving a missing pair of 
men's trousers. 

Vincent Moscaidelli of 7 — ■ ■ i > } >< 

South QuiiKy claimed he sent 
his $45 suit to the cleaners 
who lost the pants, thus wip- 
ing out the value of die suit 
which would not be a suit if 

he had to wear odd trousers. 

Judge Halloran awarded him $15. 

WELFARE HEAD FIRED 
A rumored major shakeup in the administration of Mayor 
Thomas S. Burgin failed to materialize when only Welfare 
Commissioner Alvin S. Wight was ousted and replaced in 
the $2,400 job by WPA Administrator Anthony J. Venna. 
"I have nothing personal agaiiKt Mr. Wight," said the 
mayor, "but I believe it desirable at this time to make a 
change in the administration of the Welfare Department." 
Wight called his dismissal "poUtical expediency." 
Reappointed were Ezekiel C. Sargent, public works com- 
missioner at $4,000; Harold P. Newell, treasurer at $3300; 
John D. Smith, solicitor at $3,000; N. Gorman Nickerson, 
assessor chairman at $3,250. 

SALARY CUT VETOED 
Mayor Burgin vetoed a Qty Council order that would 
have cut the salary of newly named Qty Purchasing Agent 
George BonsaU from $3,500 to $2,500 a year. 

"We pay lucrative salaries to beginners," said Councillor 
Aldo Delia Chiesa. "Let us pay this purchasing agent$2,500 
a year. If he does his work well he can expect a raise." 
FEVER EPmEMIC 
Health Commissioner Dr. Richard M. Ash, noting 416 
reported cases of scariet fever siiKe September, declared that 
an epidemic was sweeping the city, particularly in Wards 5 
and 6. 

"Call a doctor in any case of sore throat," warned Dr. Ash, 
adding that there was a great danger of serious complications 
fi-om even the slightest case. 

QUINCY-KMS 
Plans for the St. Moritz Carnival were abandoned due to 
warm weather and lack of good perform ing talent . . . John J. 
Fallon, 80, custodian of City Hall for 30 years, died at his 
home, 24 Pontiac Rd., Merrymount . . . Large brown eggs 
were 38 cents a dozen at the Ridder Farm Store in the 
Wollaston Theater Building . . . Mrs. Forrest I. Neal enter- 
tained members of the art committee of the Quincy Women's 
Qub at her home, 20 Dixwell Ave ... The State Planning 
Board announced that unemployment in Quincy had de- 
creased by 5,410 in the past four years . . . The broiled live 
lobster was 65 cents at the Anchor-In, 751 Wollaston Blvd. 
. . . Boy Scout Executive W. Edgar Wylie announced plans 
to observe the 28th anniversary of scouting in Quincy with 
a celebration of window displays . . . The Atlantic Improve- 
ment Association adqjted a resolution protesting the dis- 
continuance of half hour train service throughout the day at 
Atlantic Station . . . Guy W. Hart of 41 Summit Ave., 
Wollaston, was elected chairman of the City Hospital Board 
of Managers . . . "The Great Gambini," starring Akim 
Tamiroff and Marian Marsh, and "Silver Spurs," with Buck 
Jones, plus Chapter 10 of "Wild West Days," were playing 
at the State Theater . . . City Councillor Christian A. Burkard 
protested that people on welfare who shoveled snow for the 
city were having their wages deducted hom their welfare 
checks . . . Men's broadcloth shirts with "no wilt" collars 
were two for $1 at the Enterprise stores, 1487 Hancock St. . 
. . Earie Todd, Negro entertainer, won first prize of $10 for 
his imitation of a pipe organ, a guitar and a laughing saxo- 
phone during Amateur Night at the Quincy Theater . . . The 
Merchants Division of the Quincy Chamber of Commerce 
met to plan the fight against a proposed 2 per cent state sales 
tax . . . Chick D'Amore was master of ceremonies for the 
floor show atJack'sCafe,514South St., Quincy Point. . .Pot 
roast was 17 cents a pound at thr Mohican Maik^ 19 
Chestnut St . . . Ceremonies were planned for Febraary 18 
to icname the Adams Shore School for the late Dr. Nathanial 
S. Hunting, long-time member of the School Committee . . 



Page 6 Qulncy Sun Thursday, February 4, 1993 




Marie^s 
Kitchen 



By MARIE J. D'OUMPIO 



Jim's Gourmet 
Roasted Peppers 



While we are eagerly awaiting spring, 
we have to do something to survive the 
rest of the winter, and that at our house 
is hitting the pots and pans. 

My husband, the shopper, found a sale 
on red peppers one day and got carried 
away and bought so many that we started 
roasting them and making our own 
gourmet roasted peppers. They are easy 
and can be stored in a jar for weeks in 
the refrigerator and go well with 
sandwiches, or in an antipasto. 
Jim's Gourmet 
Roasted Peppers 

6 to 8 lai^e sweet red peppers 
1/4 to 1/2 cup olive oil (a must for 
flavor) 

3 or 4 large garlic cloves 



salt to taste 

a nice large cookie sheet 

Place peppers in broiler pan or cookie 
sheet. Broil about 4 inches from the heat 
about 15 minutes turning the peppers 
until they are charred. Allow peppers to 
cook and peel them. Cut lengthwise into 
about 1/2 inch wide strips. 

Place in mixing bowl and add the 
garlic and the olive oil and the salt. 
Toss gently. Store in jar or plastic 
container in the refrigerator. They are 
wonderful in an antipasto or with a tuna 
sub. 

P.S. You can also use green peppers 
as well with the red for a great 
combination, especially if they are on 
sale also. 



11 Quincy Public School 
Teachers In New Directory 



Eleven Quincy public 
school teachers have been 
selected for inclusion in 
the second edition of 
Who's Who Among 
America's Teachers, 1992. 

The teachers among 
65,000 instructors selected 
nationwide by their former 
students who themselves 
are currently listed in 
Who's Who Among 
American High School 



Students, or The National 
Dean's List publications. 

The students were 
requested to nominate 
teachers who "made a 
difference in their lives." 

Quincy teachers in the 
publication are: 

Ronald R. Ashford, 
North Quincy High School; 
Anne M. Basiliere, Quincy 
High; Stephen J. Cantelli, 
Lincoln-Hancock; Mary 
Margaret (Regan) Gralton, 



North Quincy High; Paul J. 
Karhu, Quincy High; 
Marcia Ann McCarthy, 
Broad Meadows; Patricia 
E. McHugh, Saint 
Joseph's; Diane Elizabeth 
Merrill, Quincy High and 
Tech Center; Gale L. 
Palmer, North Quincy 
High; Leslie Miller Taylor, 

Woodward School; 
Raymond Charles 
Whitehouse, Quincy High. 



Sons Of Italy Raise $3,200 
For Cerebral Palsy 



The Quincy Sons of 
Italy recently raised 
$3,200 at its annual 
Cerebral Palsy Brunch to 
help combat the disease. 

Nearly 300 people 
attended the brunch which 
featured Lodge poster 



child Peter Michael 
Kielczewski, the 1-1/2- 
year-old son of Steve and 
Lisa Kielczewski and 
grandson of Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter Marinelli of 
Brockton. 

WCVB-TV 5 News 



covered the event and 
news anchor Jim Boyd 
interviewed Peter Michael 
and his family. Boyd also 
accepted donations for 
Cerebral Palsy from Lodge 
President Joseph Perfetuo 
and many other donors. 




DOROTHY QUINCY HOMESTEAD 

Dorothy Quincy Homestead 
Featured In New Publication 



The Dorothy Quincy 
Homestead, located at the 
comer of Hancock St. and 
Butler Rd., Quincy, is 
among the historic 
properties featured in a 
new publication by the 
American Institute of 
Architects entitled 
Domestic Views: Historic 
Properties of The National 
Society of The Colonial 
Dames of America. 

With text by William 
Seale and photographs by 
Erik Kvalsvik, the volume 
broadly illustrates 
developments in mostly 
American architecture 
over the course of our 
nation's history. Various 
regions of the U.S. at 
different times in history 
are brought to Ufe in the 
collection of museums 
owned or supported by the 
National Society of 
Colonial Dames of 
America. 

The properties featured 
in the book reflect life 
from the Spanish era in the 
West to 20th century New 




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(Wollaston) 

479-6888 



Quincy 

Choral Society 

Chamber Chorus 

479-2061 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



JEWELRY 



(Poison ""©Jeweliy 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 
The Colettf Farhily Al - Dave - Maxk 
730 HANCOCK Sr^WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 



York. Some are grand and 
were mansions when built; 
many are plain houses 
constructed for 

comfortable shelter. 

Accompanied by 
photographs, the text 
discuss the significance of 
these properties in the 
history of their regions and 
the development of the 
American preservation 
movement. Each place 
has been selected as a 
symbol of local history in 
the state where it is 
located. 

Parts of the Dorothy 
Quincy bouse were built in 
168S by Col. Edmund 
Quincy, the second of the 
name, on land that was 
granted to an earlier 
Edmund in 1638. The 
major part was built in 
1706 by Edmund the third. 



The stately three -story 
house was the social 
center of old Braintree 
during the regime of the 
fourth Edmund. He 
fathered five daughters, 
including Dorothy Quincy. 
She married John Hancock 
in 1775. 

After the Revolution 
and the death of Edmund 
the fourth in 1788, the old 
house passed from the 
Quincy family. The 
Hancocks did not want it 
and in 1904, it was 
acquired by the 
Massachusetts Society of 
Colonial Dames. 

The Dames restored it 
with vintage furniture, 
utensils and clothing, and 
gave it to the state with 
the proviso that the Dames 
continue to run it. 



Christioe Carroll On Dean's List 



Christine Carroll of 
Quincy has been named 
for the Dean's List for the 
fall semester at Salve 
Regina University, 



Newport, R.I. 

She is the daugnter ot 
Mr. and Mrs. William 
Carroll of Mass. Ave. 



Our Policy On 

Engagement Photographs 

And Wedding Announcements 



logr^[ribs wifii m^p$<smmt assoaiiDesteots at8.|t 

ISie Sua will «lfio<i»Ux0»e lonfie m veddii^ 

wedduigpa!tyk<^<iiiigmaMofS3ialixmofl8MX»'« 
begt mm^ paretits^ lindesmaids, u^astSt flower 
girls »idn^gt)eareiV)Clc. ''; ,^'^:^;. 

. We invite iSi^pd cou|p!e» to stitailt ihselc,^ 
pliotos wltli tii»r aii&ouiicesieat&aM whtn mh* " 
- sOttlnif a}elrweddtBgpl)ot&toioclttdea<s»B^^ 
IfeUag Of fl» we4#ttg|Wty, 

tlie|tfix;e$», - ' - ' "- '" '"^ 



cooMag Ms policy ^f |Hi^!iMg ttigftB^eiiim. I 







Teacefield' Topic For 
Wollaston Garden Club 



The Wollaston Garden 
Club will meet Thursday, 
Feb. 18 at Wollaston 
Congregational Church, 
Winthrop Ave. 

A bring-your-own- 
sandwich will begin at 
noon. The meeting will 
start at 1 p.m. 



Park Ranger Davis 
Kratz of the Adams 
National Historic Post, 
Quincy, will present a 
program entitled 

"Peacefield: The Adamses 
at Home" at 1:30 p.m. 

Hostess will be Alice 
King. 



Weekend AARP Meeting Sunday 



Quincy-Braintree 
Weekend AARP Chapter 
will meet Sunday at 2 p.m. 
at the Town Brook House, 
45 Brackett St., Quincy. 

A St. Valentine's Day 
Party will be held. 
Refreshments will be 



served. 

Those planning to 
attend are asked to bring 
discarded hearing aids and 
eyeglasses for the needy. 

For more information 
call Ernest Aristide at 472- 
6312. 



Charities Dance Feb. 20 
At Morrisette Post 



Morrisette American 
Legion Post, 54 Miller St., 
West Quincy, will sponsor 
its 13th annual Charities 
Dance Saturday, Feb. 20 
from 8 p.m. to midnight 

Proceeds from the event 



are used to help support 
the Kidney Transplant- 
Dialysis Association and 
other charities. 



Donation 
person. 



is $5 per 



N.Q. Seniors Meeting Today 



North Quincy Senior 
Citizens Club will meet 
today (Thursday) at 12:30 
p.m. in Quincy Community 
United Methodist Church, 



40 Beale St. 

A Card Party will be 
held Sunday, Feb. 14 at 
12:30 p.m. 



Catholic Daughters Court 
Flea Market May 8 



Catholic Daughters 
Court 1065 will hold its 
annual Flea Market 
Saturday, May 8 from 10 
a.m. to 3 p.m. at St. 
Thomas Aquinas Hall, 
Darrow St, Houghs Neck. 



A snack bar will be 
available. Admission is 
free. 

Tables are available for 
rent at $6 apiece, $10 for 
two. For more information 
472-2927. 



Mr., Mrs. Gary Barrus 
Parents Of Son 



Mr. and Mrs. Gary 
Barrus, 16 Trescott St., 
Quincy, are parents of a 
son, Robert, bom Jan. 16 
at South Shore Hospital in 



Weymouth. 

Grandparents are Mr. 
and Mrs. Herbert Hayden 
and Mrs. Lewis Barrus, all 
of Braintree. 



3 From Quincy On 
Fitchburg St. Dean's List 



Fitchburg State College 
lists three Quincy residents 
on the Dean's List for the 
fall semester. 

Students from Quincy 
include Lori Fitzpatrick, 
biology major; Francine 



Masse and Deanna Nigro, 
both early childhood 
education majors. 

To achieve Dean's List 
status at Fitchburg full- 
time students must attain a 
grade point average of 3.2 
or better. 



Apollo Lighting & Electric 
Supply Company 

South Shore's Lighting Headquarters 
„ A Full Line Lighting and 

i \ Electrical Distributor 

Lamp Shades • Lamp Repairs 

Hrs.: Showroom Mon-Sat 9-5 Thurs9-8 
Supply Counter Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 8-5 

767-5000 

476 South Franklin St., Rt. 37, Holbrook 



CURIOSITY SHOPPE 

Frugal Gifts For All Occasions, and Much More 

Tube Socks: 6 pair $4.99 
Starter Hats: $10.00 

Framed Sports Pictures: $10.00 

We have Valentines and Greeting Cards 

•Cigarettes at everyday lovsr prices (* tax included) 

Reg. Brands: $235 pack 

Best Value: $1.25 " 

GPC $135 " 

508A SEA STREET at ADAMS SHORE 

TEL: 786-8865 (next to Mike's Barber Shop) 
HOURS: 8 -6 MON-SAT New Items Every Week llll 



Social 




MR. and MRS. ETTORE GRILLI 



Mr., Mrs. Ettore Grilli 
Celebrate 50th Anniversary 



Mr. and Mrs. Ettore A. 
Grilli recently celebrated 
their 50th w:pddiDg 
anniversary. 

A reception was held at 
Cataldi's Restaurant in 
Hanson and hosted by the 
couple's three sons, Alfred 
Grilli of Plymouth, Edward 
Grilli of Duxbury, and 
Richard Grilli of 
Hopkinton. 

Special guests from the 
original wedding party at 
the reception were Jemma 
Bielli of Quincy, maid of 
honor; and Frances 
Mitchell and Nina Dolan, 
both of Milton, 
bridesmaids. All are sisters 
of the bride. 

Rev. Leo Lynch, a 
former priest at St. John 
the Baptist Church, 
Quincy, officiated at a 



special ceremony at which 
the couple renewed their 
wedding vows. 

Mrs. Grilli is the former 
Mary M. Manzoni. The 
couple were married Nov. 
22, 1942 in St. Mary of the 
Hills Church, Milton. They 
have lived on Liberty St. 
in Quincy for 50 years. 

Mr. Grilli is a retired 
traffic manager for Union 
Gear & Sprocket, Quincy. 
He is a member of the 
Sons of Italy, Knights of 
Columbus, St. John's Holy 
Name Society, and John 
Quincy Adams Qub. 

Mrs. Grilli is a retired 
cashier for Quincy School 
Food Service. She is a 
member of the Quincy 
Catholic Club. 

They also have three 
grandchildren. 



Mr., Mrs. Eugene Allen 
Parents Of Son 



Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 
Allen of Braintree are 
parents of a son, Jake, 
born Jan. 16 at South 
Shore Hospital in 
Weymouth. 



TAN 

before 
work 



Grandparents are Mr. 
William Edwards and Mrs. 
Lee Salvucci, both of 
Quincy, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Daniel Allen of 
Connecticut. 



BALLOONS & STUFF 



690 HANCOCK ST. 

WOLLASTON 

773-0690 



Thursday, February 4, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 7 

Prof. Diane Bellavance 

Recognized In Two 
Biographical Collections 



Quincy College 
Professor Diane 

Bellavance, has been 
honored in two 
biographical collections. 

The 1993 edition of 
Citation's Who's Who of 
Rising Young Americans 
recognizes her academic 
and executive 

achievements in the public 
relations field. 

The World Intellectual 
of 1993 funher recognizes 
her special involvement 
with Youth Business 
Initiative, an international 
non-profit organization, 
which helps inner city 
youth start their own 
businesses. 



Bellavance has a 
master's degree from 
Emerson College and is 
presently a Ph.D. 
candidate at Northeastern 
University. She is the 
author of "Advertising and 
Public Relations for a 
Small Business," which is 
currently in its fifth 
edition. She has consulted 
with Metro Boston 
businesses for the past 15 
years. 

Bellavance will hold a 
workshop entitled "How 
To Promote Your Small 
Business" Feb. 13. For 
registration information 
call Quincy College at 
984-1650. 



26 Residents On Dean's List 
At Northeastern University 



Northeastern University 
lists 26 Quincy residents 
on its Dean's List for the 
fall quarter. 

They are: 

Kenneth R. Asnes, 
Mark S. Bagley, Jeffrey J. 
Bina, Brenda J. Buote, 
Joan P. Cahill, Kerry A. 
Connor, Andrea O. Decker, 
Stephen P. Des Roche, 
Stephanie A. Faren, 
Matthew R. Giese, Robert 



J. Graham, John G. 
Greene, Kenneth Haigh. 

Antoine Hajjar, Dean A. 
Hogan, Violet Kambanis, 
Sharon M. Kavanagh, 
Saeid E. Kazan, Steven F. 
Kazorek, Renee M. 
LaForest, Kam Yee Lee, 
Joseph J. Lencki, Jennifer 
S. Leung, Mara F. 
Lupacchino, Gregory 
Stevens, Michael Yee. 



Emblem Club Meeting Feb. 10 



Quincy Emblem Club 
will meet Wednesday, 
Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Quincy Elks Home in 
Squantum. 



The birthdays of 

Abraham Lincoln and 

George Washington will 
be observed. 



Laurie Galvin 
On Dean's List 

Laurie J. Galvin of semester at North Shore 
Quincy has been named to Community College, 
die Dean's List for the fall Danvers. 



imxiij.u(j.thi>jjiJxiL 




HwuUut 



Emm 



WinfieW 
Gift Emporium 

Russ Berrie Trolls 

Lilliput Lane 

Snow Babies 

Maud Humphrey 

Cat's Meow ViUage 

Snow Village 

__ ^ Hoars: Tues - Sat 10:00 am - 5:00 pm 
AAI Sunday 12-5 - Qosed Monday 
™" 853 ftmcock St^ Quincy 479-9784 



7AM 

Appointments 



$5 off 

with this ad - limit 1 



^^^ki^ 



ASK FOR THE $29.95 

BALLOON DELIVERY ■..wwy wxhXhwyxh^t^ywxt^x^^xwywxwywxyy wxt^w ^ 



Russell Edward's 



/le 



A full service hair salon 




TANNING CENTER 

77 Parkingway Quincy 
(Next to Pat Flanagan's) 

472-5256 



MONDAY 
Women's Special 

TUES & THURS 
Men's Special 

WEDNESDAY 

Perm Special 

Starting at 



$20.00 
$13.00 



Starting at $42.00 m-.x- • «o . *cn 

' Nail Tipping & Overlay $60 

All specials include wash, cut and blowdiy. Sculptured Nails $60 

Long hair slightly higher Pedicures $25 

Body & Facial Waxing Available 

We carry a full line of hair care products 
REDICEN KMS ^iUS pguLMn-ci^LL ymatfix 

■ 

472-1060 _ 

^^8 Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts., 1 Maple St., Quincy 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 4, 1993 



Arts/Entertainment 



Park Service 
Planning Team For 
Adams Historic Site 



The National Park 
Service (NPS) Adams 
National Historic Site, 
scheduled a public 
meeting for last night 
(Wednesday) at the 
Adams Academy, 8 
Adams St. 

The NPS is developing 
a General Management 
Plan for the Adams 
National Historic Site. The 
purpose of the plan is to 
formulate a management 
philosophy and provide 
direction for future 
management of the 
national historic site. 

The meeting is 
designed to facilitate 
broad public involvement 
in the identification of 
planning issues and the 
development of strategies 
for future direction in the 
management of the park. 
The meeting will address 
topics and issues such as: 
Collections Management, 
Visitor Service and 
Interpretation, Resource 



Preservation, Facilities 
Development, Land 
Protection and Staffing. 

The Adams National 
Historic Site was 
established as a unit of the 
National Park System in 
1946. The park includes 
the "Old House," the 
Beale Estate and the 
birthplaces of Presidents 
John and John Quincy 
Adams. The United First 
Parish Church, where both 
presidents and their wives 
are interred, was 
authorized in October 1980 
by Congress to be included 
in the boundary of the 
park, although it remains 
an active church owned 
and managed by its 
congregation. 

The National Park 
Service has developed a 
park newsletter, titled 
"Planning Update," which 
is available by contacting 
the Adams National 
Historic Site, 135 Adams 
St., Quincy, MA 02169, 
773-1177. 




AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS, from left to right, Debbie 
Darois, Eva Marie Pickard, Cindy Long and Kathy 
Lynch, represented the South Shore YMCA at a 
fundraiser for the American Lung Association during 
halftime of a recent New England Patriots game. The four 
instructors practiced a routine for two months. They 
were among more than 200 aerobic instructors who 
participated and helped raise more than $16,000. The 
South Shore Y instructors raised more than $600. 

N.Q. Children Raise 
$863 For Easter Seals 



HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES & PIES 

"There's No Taste 
Like Homemade" 

6aA BMIng* Rd. 
N. Quiney, MA 

472-8558 



Youngsters from 
Toddlers Tech in North 
Quincy recently raised 
$863 to help people with 
disabilities in an Easter 
Seal HOP-N-ING. 

Each child secured 
pledges from family 
members and friends for 
every hop performed 
during a three-minute 
HOP-N-ING. The funds 
helped provide Easter Seal 
services for men, women 
and children with 
disabilities. 

Easter Seal services 
include summer camp, 



therapeutic swim 
programs, home health 
care, physical and 
occupational therapy,, 
speech therapy, equipment 
loan, technology for 
independence, support 
groups for people 
recovering from strokes 
and information and 
referral services. 

Last year more than 
17,000 children from 
across Massachusetts 
hopped for Easter Seals, 
raising nearly $250,000. 
The HOP-N-ING is 
sponsored by T.J. Maxx. 



Creates a Lifetime of Confidence! 



Little Red Riding iloud, 

More-or-Lcss.' 

After Registration At 1 p.m. 



THanc'PuTdy's 

Children's 

Theatre 

Workshop 



Register for Classes - Saturday, 
February 6th lliOOam - 1:00pm 





Our Own Homemade 
SEAFOOD 
CHOWDER 

••rving 
FRESH FISH 



Call for a brochure 
•k No Auditions Required 
* Easy Payment Plans 

617-472-9233 

Shows and Classes Held at: 
Woodward School 

1 102 Hancock Si. 

Quincy Center — 
Just North of the 'T' station 




Beginners 44 years old 

Mondays 5-6: 15 or 

Saturdays 10-11:15 

Reguhr 8-14 years old 

Wednesdays 4:30-6:30 or 

Fridays 4:30-6:30 or 

Saturdays 11:30-1:30 

Advanced 14 & Up 

Wednesdays 7:30-9:30 





mu^^^. 



h 



i 



mister SUB 



Pizza - Pasta - Subs 

Syrians - Salads 

Dine in or Carry Out, or Deiivered 



62-64 Billings Road, No. Quincy, MA 02171 
Hot Line 328-9764 • 328-0266 FAX 786-9792 




Mass., Norfolk County Bars 

Essay Content Open 

To Quincy Students 



The Massachusetts Bar 
Association has announced 
its 1993 law-related essay 
contest, which is locally 
sponsored by the Norfolk 
County Bar Association. 

The contest is open to 
all students in Grades 9-12 
and winners receive cash 
prizes. 

The essay topic is 
based on the hypothetical 
situation of a girls' field 
hockey team claiming that 
is being illegally 
discriminated against by 
its school which dedicates 
more staff and financial 
resources to a boys' 
football team. Essayists 
are asked to examine the 
facts of the case and the 
law which forbids 
discrimination in school 
athletics. 



Entrants from Norfolk 
County must submit their 
essays by March 1 to the 
Norfolk County Bar 
Association. County bar 
members will judge the 
essays and then submit the 
five best entries to the 
MBA for statewide 
judging. First, second and 
third place winners will be 
selected, and prizes of 
$250, $100 and $75 
respectively will be 
awarded. Five honorable 
mentions will receive 
plaques. Prizes will be 
presented at an April 
ceremony in Boston. 

Complete copies of the 
contest question and rules 
may be obtained by 
calling the MBA's law- 
related education 
department at 542-3602. 



Country And Western Dance 
At St. Mary's Parish Feb. 6 



St. Mary's Social 
Committee will host a 
Country & Western Dance 
Saturday, Feb. 6 from 8 
p.m. to midnight in the 
parish hall. Crescent St., 
West Quincy. 

Entertainment will be 
provided by Jimbo Wilson 
and the Cranberry Junction 



Band. Western or casual 
dress is reconunended. 

Tickets are $7 and may 
be obtained at St. Mary's 
Rectory or from Mike and 
Louise Priscella at 773- 
4998, Mary and Leo 
DePolo at 773-7753, Gerry 
Ryan at 471-9400, or Bill 
Griffin at 471-9385. 



Beechwood Center Expands 
Kindergarten Program 



program, and kindergarten 
students from all city 
schools participate in the 
center's afternoon After 
School Program. 



Cinemas 

Quincy Fair Mall 
2/4-2/10 



SCENT OFA 
WOMAN (R) 

12:1»4:30-7K)0-1090S 

LOADED WEAPON 
(PG-13) 

12:10 - 2:20 - 4^40 - 7:25 - tOK» 
FRU. SAT ONLY 12:20 AM 

ASPEN 
EXTREME (PG-13) 

2:10-4:35 

CHILDREN OF THE^ 
CORN II (R) 

7n5-9:SS 
FRItaATOWLY 12:10 AM 

SNIPER (R) 

1 2K)0 -2:15 - 4:30 - 7:30 • lOA) 
FRI*8AT0NLY12d»AM 



AUVE(R) 

12:30-3:15-7:15- -tiSO 
FRI&8AT0NLY 12:15 AM 



lA FEW GOOD MEN (R)1 

12:25-3:2S-7A)-««0 
FRI I. SAT ONLY 12:15 AM 



NOWHERE TO RUN (R) 

' MM 



SOAMERSBY (PG-13) 

11:46-2:1&4d0-7dO-9M 
FRI«SATOra.Y 12:15 AM 



The new service is a 
pilot effort, designed to 
accommodate children 
who are switching to 
afternoon kindergarten in 
the Quincy Public Schools 
this month. 

The program will open 
daily at 7:30 a.m. and 
provide learning, music 
and recreational activities. 
Children will lunch at the 
center, and transportation 
from Beechwood to school 
will be provided each 
afternoon. 

Beechwood Community 
Life Center, 225 Fenno 
St., WoUaston, has 
recently expanded its 
kindergarten services. 

The center already 
serves kindergarten with a 
full-day accrediteH 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



JIMMY JAY MUSIC 



Guaranteed Lowest 

Prices on Cassettes, 

CDs and Records 



690 HANCOCK ST. 
WOLLASTON 479-7080 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14 BEALE ST 773-4600 



THE VANISHING (R) 

11«>-2:15-4fl5-7:10-»a0 
FRIk SAT ONLY 12.10 AM 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Shows 

$3.75 

773-5700 



Hold over second week 

"A RIVER RUNS 

THROUGH rr* (PG) 

A Family Tale 

About Life 

Wed & Thura 7:00 only 

Fri&Sat 7:00 & 9:15 

Sun-Thurs 7:00 only 



Mon & lues Dollar Night 



ALL SEATS $3.00 



Thursday, February 4, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 9 



FXEMENTARV 
LUNCH 



Feb. 8-12 

Mon: pizza, fruit juice, 
chocolate chip cookies, 
milk. 

Tues: Early release 
day. No lunch served. 

Wed: tuna salad on a 
roll, chopped lettuce, fruit 
juice, milk. 

T h u r s : turkey 
fricassee, mashed potato, 
vegetable, fresh baked 
white roll, milk. 

Fri: golden brown 
pancakes, apple sauce, 
sausage links, maple 
syiup, celery sticks, milk. 



SECONDARY 
LUNCH 



Feb. 8-12 

Mon: pizza, green 
beans, apple crisp, milk. 

Tues: Early release day 
for middle and high 
school.: hamburger on a 
roll, cole slaw or salad, 
fruit juice, jello, milk. 

Wed: grilled hot dog on 
a roll, vegetarian beans, 
fruit juice, milk. 

Thurs: breaded veal 
cutlet with sauce, side 
order of rotini, fi^sh baked 
italian roll, fruit juice, 
milk. 

Fri: grilled cheese 
sandwich, tater tots, fruit 
juice, milk. 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 



SERVICE 



MOBIU 



AUTO HOME BUSINISS 
. • DUOBOLTSINS'.AILED 

LOCKS REKETED 

DOOR CLOSERS 
.• PANIC HARDWAilE 
'• AUTO KEYS FinEO 



VISIT OUR SHOWROOM 
756 SO. ARTFRY. QUINCY 

472-2177 




As light on your 
budget as it is 
on your feet. 

Now just *24 



90 



(reg. »42«') 




Avanti 

Available in black, 

mahogany multi 

& pewter 



HANLON 5 



QUINCY-27B Cottage Av*. 

Hen thru Wad, Fri & Sat until 6 pm 
ThUf*. untl9pffl. 



WeVe Loaned 

Millions lb Hundreds 

Of Area Businesses, 

Helped Them 

Maii^ Then- Cash 

Thrau^ Good Times 

And Bad. And CaUed 

The Soutti Shore Our 

Home For Almost 

150 Years. 

Now It's Time lb 
Introduce Ourselves. 



We're Quincy Savings Bank, 

but don't let our name fool you. Because 
if you think you can't get quality com- 
mercial products from a savings bank, 
think again. 

We offer very competitive commer- 
cial products and a level of service that 
rivals what you'd find at the bigger 
banks. We have flexible policies that help 
us tailor our products to fit the needs of 
your business. And most of our branches 
throughout the South Shore have after 
hours access for night deposits to make 
banking with us a Httle easier. 

Local headquarters, 
local decisions 

We're a local bank founded and head- 
quartered in Quincy, which means that 



decisions are made quickly with an 
eye toward the unique opportunities 
on the South Shore. So you're not 
stuck waiting for answers out of 
Providence, Hartford or Boston, com- 
peting for loans with businesses 
throughout New England. 

Experienced commercial 
officers, ready to help 

Our commercial officers are experienced 
professionals who know how to help you 
find the solutions your firm needs - 
whether it's a business loan, a cash 
management service to help you 
maximize your cash, or a conunercial 
checking account. Our commercial 
officers can help you manage your 
business by providing answers on how 
to best borrow to ensure an adequate 
cash flow to suit your business needs. 



Of course, we're ready to help 
manage your total banking relationship 
with commercial deposit products, too. 
And all deposits at Quincy Savings are 
insured in ftill through the combined 
insurance coverage offered by the 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
(FDIC) and Deposit Insurance Fund of 
Massachusetts (DIFM). 

At Quincy Savings we believe that 
our merger with a commercial bank and 
strong capital put us in a better position 
to serve your commercial needs than 
ever before. Next time you're in the 
market for a commercial deposit or loan 
account, call us at (617)471-3500. Well 
prove you can get excellent commercial 
products and services fix)m this savings 
bank. 




Quincy Savings Bank 

Braintree, Brockton, Hanover, Hingham, 

Marshfield, Norwell, Quincy, Scituate, Plymouth 

(617) 471-3500 • Member FDIC/DIFM 



Page 10 Qulncy Sun Thursday, February 4, 1993 



Obituaries 



William A. Griffin, 75 

Former Accountant With 
mS, Rubber Co. 



A funeral Mass for 
WUliam A. Griffin, 75, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 30 in St. John's 
Church. 

Mr. Griffin died Jan. 28 
at Norwood Hospital after 
a brief ilbess. 

He was a former 
accountant with the 
Internal Revenue Service 
and for Steadfast Rubber 
Co. of Mattapan and North 
Easton. 

An Army veteran of 
World War 11, he was a 
member of the Knights of 
Columbus in Quincy and 
the Franciscan Society. He 
served as an acolyte at St. 
John's Church. 

He enjoyed playing golf 



and was a member of 
Presidents' Golf Course, 
WoUaston. 

Bom in Somerville, he 
lived in Quincy since 
1964. 

Husband of the late 
Catherine L. 

(McSweeney) Griffin, he 
is survived by a son, 
William E. Griffin of 
Quincy; a daughter, Ellen 
M. Sullivan of Stoughton; 
two sisters, Mary Collins 
of Maiden and Katherine 
Barron of Weymouth; and 
three grandchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Ehn St. 




A THOUGHT 
FOR THE WEEK 

Hiatorians rate Abraham tin- 
coin orw of the greatest Ameri- 
can presidents. 

Lincoln was not an appeaaer 

nor one who yielded to the expe- 

SCOTT DEWARE diency of the hour. He was a man 

of strong morals and splrHua! Insight ... a man of character 

and high principles. 

Ironicaliy, Lincoln, who often spoke so eloquently of 
peace, was fated to ioiow nothing but war In the four years 
and one month of his presidency. He bore the griefs of a 
nation at war on his shoulders. His faith and courage kept us 
an undivMed natkm. 

Yes, Lincoln was more tiian a great American. He was a 
great humanitarian. He was a man of great ability, with 
Immense spiritual Insight. He had an unusual understanding 
of the dignity of the common man . . . 

We, as a nation, are indeed fortunate to have had Lincoln 
as our President during a very difficult time In our nation's 
history. 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the 'New England Funeral Trust' 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered to Any Distance 



John F. Kelly, 62 

Former Gillette Engineer; 
Held Packaging Patents 



A funeral Mass for John 
F. "Jack" Kelly, 62, of 
Hobe Sound, Fla., formerly 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 30 in St. John the 
Baptist Church. 

Mr. Kelly died Jan. 26 
at home after a brief 
illness. 

He was an expert in 
engineering and 

engineering management. 
A packaging engineer with 
Gillette for 33 years, he 
travelled in Europe and 
South America and in his 
last 18 years with the 
company was responsible 
for domestic and 
international operations. 
He also spent four years in 
London, England. 

A professional engineer 
hcensed in Massachusetts, 
he held many patents in 
packaging and was a 
member of the Packaging 
Institute U.S.A. and 
Institute of Packaging U.K. 

He served with the 
Naval Reserve. 

He was a past Grand 
Knight of the Scituate 



Council, Knights of 
Columbus. 

Born in Boston, he 
graduated from Boston 
Technical School in 1948 
and Northeastern 
University in 1959. He 
Uved in Quincy for several 
years before moving to 
Florida six years ago. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Mary F. (Sumares) 
McCaffrey-Kelly of Hobe 
Sound; two sons, John F. 
Kelly Jr. of Manchester, 
N.H. and Paul J. Kelly of 
Londonderry, N.H.; two 
daughters. Colleen M. 
Menard of Sandown, N.H., 
and Linda A. Kelly of 
Londonderry; a brother, 
Frank Kelly of Whitman; 
and two granddaughters. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the charity of one's 
choice. 



Ursula Nameika, 88 

Volunteer In Quincy Campaigns 



A funeral Mass for 
Ursula (Reines) Nameika, 
88, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Jan. 29 in 
Sacred Heart Church. 

Mis. Nameika died Jan. 
25 at Beth Israel Hospital 
in Boston after a long 
illness. 

She was an active 
volunteer in many political 
campaigns in the City of 
Quincy. 

She Uved 20 years in 
the Fenno House senior 
citizens housing complex 
in WoUaston, where she 
was involved in many 
activities. She was an 
active member of the 



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Volunteers. 

Born and educated in 
Lithuania, she immigrated 
to South Boston when she 
was 16 and lived in 
Quincy for many years. 

Wife of the late Frank 
J. Nameika, she is 
survived by a son, Frank 
Nameika of Scituate; a 
daughter, Marian O'Brien 
of Maiden; a sister. Vera 
Manisa of Quincy; two 
nephews, 10 grandchildren 
and two great- 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in New 
Calvary Cemetery, Boston. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Lydon Funeral 
Home, 644 Hancock St. 



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James E. Caldwell, 91 

Retired Woolen Industry Supervisor 

A funeral service for when he was 19. He lived 
James E. Caldwell, 91, of in Pawtucket for 30 years 
Quincy, was held Monday and in Manchester, Conn, 
in the Deware Funeral for 25 years before moving 
Home, 576 Hancock St. to Quincy six years ago. 



Mr. Caldwell died Jan. 
27 at Quincy Hospital. 



He is survived by his 
wife, Eva E. (Barker) 
Caldwell; two sons. 
He was a retired William Caldwell of 
supervisor for the College Park, Pa., and 
American Silk Spinning Charles E. Caldwell of 
Co. in Connecticut. He Quincy; seven 

was a supervisor in the grandchildren, and four 
woolen industry for many great-grandchildren, 
years. Burial was in Union 

Born in England, he Cemetery, North 

came to Rhode Island Smithfield, R.I. 

Helen M . Blanchard, 75 

Worked As Stitcher For 20 Years 

A funeral service for Strong, Me., she lived in 



Helen Mae (Brackley) 
Blanchard, 75, of Quincy, 
was held Monday in the 
Hamel, Wickens and 
Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St. 

Mrs. Blanchard died 
Jan. 28 at Quincy Hospital 
after a long illness. 

She was a former 
stitcher at Millham 
Products for 20 years. 

She was a member of 
Houghs Ne ck 

Congregational Church. 

Born and educated in 



Quincy for 51 years. 

Wife of the late 
Frederick M. Blanchard, 
she is survived by a son, 
James M. Blanchard of 
Quincy; three daughters, 
Vina Egan and Beverly R. 
MacLean, both of Quincy, 
and Mary C. Higgins of 
Halifax; two 

stepdaughters, JoAnn 
Garceau and Nancy 
Tropzo, both of California; 
and 11 grandchildren. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 



Paul Vallatini, 73 



A funeral Mass for Paul 
Vallatini, 73, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Monday in 
St. John's Church, 

Mr. Vallatini died Jan. 
29 at home after a brief 
illness. 

He was a former truck 
driver for Jordan Marsh 
and Delivery Corp., 
Quincy, where he worked 
for more than 20 years. 

A lifelong resident of 
Quincy, he was educated 
in local schools and was a 
graduate of Quincy High 
School. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Florence (Magrini) 



Vallatini; a brother, 
George Vallatini of 
Quincy; and many nieces 
and nephews. He was the 
brother of the late Frank 
Vallatini, Archie Vallatini 
and Yvonne Carrera. 

Burial was in Mt. 
WoUaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Bolea- 
Buonflglio Funeral Home, 
116FrankhnSt. 

Donations may be made 
to the Huntington's 
Disease Society of 
America, Massachusetts 
Chapter, 80 East Concord 
St., Boston, MA 02116. 



Joseph W. Condon, 86 



A funeral Mass for 
Joseph W. Condon, 86, of 
West Quincy, was 
celebrated Monday in St. 
Mary's Church. 

Mr. Condon died Jan. 28 
in John Adams Nursing 
Home after a brief illness. 

He was a truck driver 
for Garrity Oil Co. in 
Dorchester for many years. 

He was a former 
salesman for Rust Craft 
greeting cards in Dedham. 

Bom in Dorchester, he 
was educated in Boston 



and lived in Quincy for 40 
years. 

He is survived by a 
nephew and a two nieces, 
Charles Martindale of 
North Easton, Eleanor 
Coughlin of Hanson and 
Elizabeth Haraska of 
Dorchester. 

Burial was in St. 
Patrick's Cemetery, 
Abingtoa 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 326 
Copeland St. 



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John H. Chapman, 68 

Music Teacher; Band Director; 
Played With Jimmy Dorsey 



A funeral service for 
John H. Chapman, 68, of 
Quincy, was held 
yesterday (Wednesday) in 
First Church of Weymouth. 

Mr. Chapman died Jan. 
31 at home after a brief 
illness. 

He was a music teacher 
and band director at North 
Junior High School in 
Brockton. He began his 
professional music career 
at age 14, playing the 
saxophone, clarinet and 
flute. 

Throughout his career 
he toured and recorded 
with many bands, 
including the Jimmy 
Dorsey, Tony Pastor, 
Freddie Satterio and 
Johnny Shea Bands. 

He was first taught 
instrumental music and 
was band leader in public 
schools in Concord and 
Lexington. 

He received the bronze 
star for Army service 
during World War II. 

He had his private 
pilot's license and also 
enjoyed car racing, 
traveling and making 
model airplanes and cars. 



He also loved animals. 

Bom in Boston, he grew 
up in Dorchester and 
graduated from the New 
England Conservatory of 
Music and Bridgewater 
State College. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Barbara (NichoUs) 
Fluhr-Chapman; three 
sons, Jay Chapman of 
Hingham, Steven Fluhr of 
Hartford and Stephen 
Chapman of Onset; four 
daughters, Doris Mastin of 
Denver, Kristin Fluhr of 
Quincy, Kathleen Fluhr of 
New Yotk City and Susan 

Synan of Plymouth; a 
sister, Barbara Casassa of 
Stoughton; five 

grandchildren, a cousin 
and many nieces and 
nephews. 

Burial was in Cedar 
Grove Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Daniel Mastin 
Medical Fund, Quincy 
Cooperative Bank, 85 
Quincy Ave., Quincy, MA 
02169. 



Margaret R. O'Malley, 71 

Former Teacher At Quincy College; 
Advocate For Retarded 



A funeral Mass for 
Margaret R. (Waterman) 
O'Malley, 71, of 
Braintree, a former teacher 
at Quincy College, was 
celebrated Jan. 29 in 
Sacred Heart Church, 
Weymouth Landing. 

Mrs. O'Malley died Jan. 
25 at Milton Hospital. 

A graduate of Boston 
College, she raised her 
children, then went back 
to school to earning 
teaching credentials at 
Salem State College. 

She again returned to 
school in the early 1980s 
and received a master's 
degree in business 
education at Suffolk 
University. 

Her last teaching 
position was at St. 
Gregory's High School in 
Dorchester, where she 
worked for eight years. 

She was known to 
Braintree school officials 
as a strong advocate for 
the retarded. Her daughter, 
Eileen C. O'Malley, has 
Down's syndrome and Mrs. 
O'Malley encouraged the 
school system to establish 
a program for youngsters 
with that problem. She was 
very proud that her 
daughter graduated from 
Braintree High School and 
holds a responsible job. 

She also taught 
Christian Doctrine classes 
at her parish. Sacred Heart 
Church in Weymouth 
Landing. 

Bom in Brooklyn, N.Y., 
she grew up in St. Peter's 
Parish, Dorchester, and 
moved to Braintree in 
1955. 

She was an 

accomplished cook. She 
also enjoyed crocheting. 



knitting, sewing and doing 
crossword puzzles. 

She is Jilso survived by 
her husband, Thomas J. 
O'Malley; a son, Thomas 
J. O'Malley Jr. of Jamaica 
Plain; five other daughters, 
Virginia Spyridopoulos and 
Marie T. O'Malley-Morin, 
both of Milton, Kathleen 
M. O'Malley of Brookline, 
and Margaret R. Doneghey 
and Patricia A. Brennan, 
both of Abington; and 12 
grandchildren. She was the 
mother of the late Kevin 
O'Malley. 

Burial was in New 
Calvary Cemetery, 
Mattapan. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Joseph R. 
Lucid Funeral Home, 
Braintree. 

Donations may be made 
to the South Shore 
Association for Retarded 
Citizens, 371 River St., 
North Weymouth, MA 
02191. 



FULLY 
INSURED 

FRFF 
ESTIMATFS 



John J. Chiavaroli Sr., 57 

Supervisor In County Sheriffs Office 

A funeral Mass for John Chiavaroh Jr. and Karen J. 

J. Chiavaroli Sr., 57, of Delorio, both of Quincy; 

West Quincy , was four brothers, Domenic 

celebrated yesterday Chiavaroli of Weymouth, 

(Wednesday) in St. Mary's Stephen Chiavaroli of 

Church. Milton, Cario Chiavaroli 

Mr. Chiavaroli died Jan. of Braintree and Paul 

30 at home after a brief Chiavaroh of Marshfield; 

lUness. five sisters, Jennie Joyce 

He was a project and Barbara Camali, both 

supervisor in the Norfolk of Quincy, Vera 

County Sheriff's office for Caramanica of Braintree, 
two years. He was also a 



Thursday, February 4, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 11 

Richard C. Metcalf, 76 

Quincy Firefighter For 32 Years 



plasterer for 25 years. 

A lifelong resident of 
Quincy, he was a 1954 
graduate of Quincy High 
School. He was inducted 
into the Hockey Hall of 
Fame in March. 

He was a member of 
the Quincy Lodge of Elks 
and an associate member 
of the Cyril P. Morrisette 
American Legion Post. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Eunice C. (Mahon) 
Chiavaroli; a son and 
daughter, John J. 



Bruna Ascenzi of Rhode 
Island and Gloria 
Robicheau of Duxbury; 
and two granddaughters. 

Burial was in St Mary's 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the Glover Memorial 
Hospital Oncology 
Department, 105 Chestnut 
St., Needham, MA 02192. 



Richard Clarence 
Metcalf, 76, of Fort 
Lauderdale, Fla., a Quincy 
firefighter for 32 years, 
died Jan. 31 at his home. 

Bom in Quincy, he was 
a member of the first 
graduating class of North 
Quincy High School. He 
lived in Quincy until 
retiring from the fire 
department in 1979, after 
which he moved to 
Florida. 

He was a Navy veteran 
of both Worid War n and 
the Korean War. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Edna (Shirley) 
Metcalf; two daughters. 



Joan Lindsay of Fort 
Lauderdale and Shirley 
Highfield of West 
Yarmouth; four sisters, 
Barbara Totten and Doris 
Lyons, both of Quincy, 
Roberta Baker of 
Rockland and Lydia Ciardi 
of Randolph; and two 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Fairchild 
Funeral Home, Oakland 
Park. 

Donations may be made 
to the Hospice Care of 
Broward County, Inc., 309 
SE 18th St., Fort 
Lauderdale, FL 33316. 



License Board Briefs 



Emily V. Asklund, 83 

Former Secretary; Volunteer 
For Quincy Hospital Auxiliary 



A funeral service for 
Emily V, (Grant) Asklund, 
83, of Quincy, was held 
yesterday (Wednesday) in 
Faith Lutheran Church. 

Mrs. Asklund died Jan. 
30 in Quincy Hospital after 
a brief illness. 

A former secretary, she 
worked at Granite Trust 
and Pneumatic Scale in 
Quincy and the American 
Mutual Insurance Co. in 
Boston. 

She was a 32-year 
volunteer with Quincy 
Hospital Auxiliary. 

She was a member of 
the South Shore Viking 
Club in Braintree and a 
former member of the 
Atlantic Lodge, Order of 
Eastern Star. 

Bom in Dorchester, she 



moved to Quincy when she 
was five years old and 
attended school in Quincy. 
She is survived by her 
husband, Arthur E. 
Asklund; a brother, Irving 
B. Grant of DeBary, Fla.; 
and several nieces and 
nephews. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Hamel, 
Wickens and Troupe 
Funeral Home, 26 Adams 
St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Quincy Hospital 
Auxiliary, Whitwell St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 



The Quincy License 
Board took the following 
action at its meeting 
Tuesday: 

•Granted a request from 
St. Mary's Church, 115 
Crescent St. (Paul 
Connolly) for a one-day 
liquor license for a 
Country & Western Dance 
Saturday, Feb. 6 fi^om 8 
p.m. to midnight. 

•Postponed for one 
week a request from G.J. 
Coddington's, 1250 
Hancock St. 
Cook) for 



Thursday, Feb. 11 from 6 
to 9 p.m. for the Quincy 
Partnership benefit dance. 
•Granted a request from 
Osco Drug, 132 Granite St. 
for approval to change the 
manager of their All- 
Alcohol Package Store 
license from present 
manager Ronald Cardarelli 
to Robert Manning. 



•Granted a request fix)m 

the Quincy Youth 

Basketball Team (Robert 

(George Manning) for a permit to 

a one-day conduct a Caiming Drive 



extension of premises of Friday through Sunday, 
their liquor license Feb. 12-14. 



WANTED 

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Sterling Silverware - Any Condition 

Old wristwatches and pocket watches 

Broken Gold Rings Chains - Bracelets 

Diamonds - Any Size 

TOP PRICES PAID 

QUINCY JEWELRY 

543 Washington St. Quincy, Rt. 3A 
773-1 501 Closed Sun. & Men. 



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51 HANCOCK, QUINCY 



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We Specialize in: 
Program Books, Brochures, Newspapers, 
Newsletters, Political Flyers, Tickets, 
Stationery, Envelopes and Typesetting. 




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1372 Hancock St., Quincy Square 

471-3100 



J 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 4, 1993 

St. Ann*s Young Adults 
To Hear Columnist 



The Young Adult Group 
of St. Ann's Parish, 
Wollaston, announces its 
schedule of events for 
Febniary. 

Kathleen Howley, a 
freelance columnist who 
appears each week in the 
Pilot, will speak Sunday, 
Feb. 21 at 7 p.m. at the 
Msgr. Scally Parish 
Center, St. Ann's Road 
(across from Veterans 
Memorial Stadium). 

She will discuss 
Enneagrams, a 



controversial New Age 
personality schema. All 
ages are welcome. 

The Young Adult Group 
will also meet Sunday, 
Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. at St. 
Ann's Rectory, 757 
Hancock St., to receive 
ii^ut from young adults as 
to what they are looking 
for in a Catholic youth 
adult group. All young 
adults (ages 19-39) are 
invited to attend. 

For information call Pat 
O'Brien, 479-7232. 




Rev. LuAnn Johnson 
Begins Ministry At Covenant 



The 10:45 a.m. worship 
service Sunday at 
Covenant Congregational 
Church, Whitwell and 
Granite Sts., marks Rev. 
LuAnn Johnson's first 
Sunday as the new pastor. 

She will lead a service 
of Communion and preach. 
Her official installation 



will be Feb. 14. A 
reception will follow the 
installation. 

Richard Smith, minister 
of music, will direct and 
accompany the choir. 

Sunday School will 
begin at 9:30 a.m. 

For more information 
call 479-5728. 



*Bring A Friend Brunch' 
At Wollaston Congregational 



'You Are Needed' Topic 
At United Methodist 



A "Bring A Friend 
Brunch" will be held 
Sunday, Feb. 7 at 11:30 
a.m. at Wollaston Cong- 
regational Church, Lincoln 
and Winthrop Ave.'s. 

Cost is $5 for ages 12 
and older and $3 for 
children under age 12. 
There is a maximum cost 



of $20 for families. If you 
bring a friend your friend 
eats free. 

The menu features roast 
beef, ham, turkey, eggs 
benedict, pastries, breads, 
beverages and more. 

For reservations call 
773-7432, 328-0603, or 
471-3121. 



^Christians And Chandeliers' 
Point Congregational Topic 



The Rev. Harry Soper 
Jr. will preach on "You 
Are Needed" at the 10 
a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Quincy 
Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St. 

Sunday School will 
follow the Young Disciples 
message. Church facilities 
are wheelchair accessible 



and nursery 
provided. 

Ushers will 
and Julia 
Greeters will 
Tirrell and 
Wickens. The 



care is 

be Burton 

Millbam. 

be Gloria 
Arlene 

fellowship 
hour in Susannah Wesley 
Hall will be hosted by 
Kathleen Emerson, Dan 
Bollen and Brenda 
Cardarelli. 



The Rev. Fred Atwood- 
Lyon, pastor, will preach 
on "Being Salty Christians 
And Magnificent 
Chandeliers" at the 10 
a.m. worship service 

Sunday at Quincy Point 
Congregational Church, 
Washington St. and 
Southern Artery. 

The Rev. Carol Atwood- 



Lyon, pastor, will serve as 
liturgist. Acolytes will be 
members of the 1993 
Confirmation class. 

Church School classes 
are Sundays at 10 a.m. 
Parents wishing to register 
their children in the 
Church School should 
speak with Debbie Tait, 
superintendent, on 
Sundays or caU 773-6424. 



'The Power' Sermon Topic 
At Bethany Congregational 



The Rev. Roger 
Ketcham will preach on 
"The Power That Keeps 
Us Going" at the 10 a.m. 
worship service Sunday at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, Quincy Center. 

Scripture reader will be 
Pauline Anderson. The 
chancel choir will sing 



SAINT JOSEPH SCHOOL 

22 PRAY STREET 

QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02169 

St. Joseph School in Quincy offers a quality academic 

education in a totally God centered atmosphere. 

Offering Excellence In Education 
Pre-K Program 4 days/wk 
All Day Kindergarten Program 
Quality Academic Programs 
Computer Education Gr. 1-8 
Program in Human Development/ 
Human Sexuality K-8 
Complete Drug & 
Alcohol Education Program K-8 
Special Art & Music Programs K-8 
Physical Education in 
completely equipped Gym K-8 
French 7 & 8 
Library Science K-6 
Full Time Guidance & Counselling K-8 
Junior Achievement 
Program 7 & 8 (Business In Ed.) 
Chapter I Tutorial Program K-6 




"We believe 
in children 
and their 
ability to 
creatively 
shape the 
future." 



Extra Curricular Programs: 
Basketball, Volleyball, Cheerleading, Choir, 
Student Coimcil, National Junior Beta Club, 
After School Care until 5:30-5 days a wk. 

Visit us during our celebration of National Catholic Schools 
Week and see for yourself what is offered and the 
atmosphere in which our students live and learn. 

Open House: Friday, Feb. 5, 9:15 - 11:15 

All Welcome! 



under the direction of 
Gregory Flynn, organist 
with a violin obligato by 
Rosemary Way. 

Assisting Rev. Ketcham 
in serving Holy 
Communion will be Kinya 
Mikami, Vivian Miller, 
Clifford Evers and Bryant 
Carter Sr. Greeters will be 
Margaret Kelsey and 
Marcia Jacob. Hostesses 
for the fellowship hour 
following the service will 
be Lois Green and Roberta 
Murphy. 

Church School classes 
are held at 10 a.m. in the 
parish house. The Bible 
Study group will meet 
Sunday at 8:30 a.m. Child 
care is provided during the 
worship service for infants 
and toddlers. The church is 
accessible to the 
physically handicapped 
via a ramp on the Spear 
St. side of the church. 



Morrisette Annual 
Memorial Mass Feb. 15 



Morrisette Legion Post 
will celebrate its 64th 
annual Memorial Mass 
Monday, Feb. 15 at St. 
Mary's Church. 

Activities will begin at 
the post home, 54 Miller 
St., West Quincy at 9 a.m. 
with a brief flag raising 
ceremony. Mayor James 
Sheets, accompanied by 
Post Commander Daniel J. 
Mahoney and Post 
Historian Thomas Eames 
will lay a memorial wreath 
at the memorial to Cyril P. 
Morrisette outside the 
West Quincy Fire Station 
on Copeland St. 

The parade will 
continue to St. Mary's 
Church, Crescent St., for 
the 10 a.m. Memorial 



Mass to commemorate and 
remember the post's 
departed comrades. The 
Memorial Mass will be 
celebrated by Fr. Daniel 
Hunt, LTC, USA Retired, 
Past Department Chaplain. 
Following the Mass the 
unit will reform and march 
back to the post for 
refineshments. 

The Quincy High 
School March Band, under 
the direction of Brian 
Carter, will provide music 
for the marching units. All 
members of veterans 
organizations, religious 
and civic leaders, veterans 
of all services and wars, 
their families and the 
general public are invited 
to attend. 



'Life At Hard Labor' Topic 
At United First Parish 



Dr. Sheldon Bennett, 
minister, will preach on 
"Life At Hard Labor" at 
the 10:30 a.m. worship 
service Sunday at United 
First Parish Church 
(Unitarian Universalist) in 
Quincy Center. 

Music director Norman 
Corey will play several 
organ solos. Ushers will be 
Louise Hall and Matt 
Malloy. 

Visitors are welcome 



and are invited to the 
social hour after the 
service. Hosts will be 
Marion Cramer and Cathy 
Gleason. 

Historic First Parish, 
"Church of the 
Presidents," is located at 
1306 Hancock St. opposite 
City Hall. Church School 
and child care (Brenda 
Chin, director) are 
provided. CaU 773-1290 for 
information. 



Four Chaplains Sunday 
At HN Congregational 



Four Chaplains Sunday 
will be observed this week 
at Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church, 
Manet Ave. 

The day is set aside to 
remember the two 
ministers, priest and rabbi 
who gave their life jackets 
to four wounded men and 
went down with the USS 
Dorchester Feb. 3, 1943. 

The Rev. M. Alicia 
Corea will preach on "The 
Meaning Of Prayer" at the 
9 a.m. worship service. 
Diaconate members 
serving will be Paula 



Red Cross Office 
Seeks Volunteer 



The South Area Office 
of the American Red 
Cross, 85 Quincy Ave., 
Quincy, is looking for a 
volunteer with good 
communication and people 



OUnitedWay 

^^^^ It brings out the best in ill of us. 



skills who is able to give 
four to eight hours per 
week. 

The volunteer will do 
general office work such 
as typing, filing, answering 
the telephone, and special 
projects. 

For an appointment call 
Jeanne Stone between 
8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. at 
770-2600. 



Church of 
Saint John 
the Baptist 

44 School St., Quincy, MA 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Saturday 4:00 & 7:00 pm 

Sunday: 7 am, 

9 am, 1 1 am, 

12:30 and 5:30 pm 

Confessions in Chapel Sat. 3-3:45 pm 

\VRectoiy-21Gay St. 773-1021 




=/ 



Younie and Robert Gordon. 
Greeter will be Jean 
Patton. 

Dr. Peter V. Corea will 
preach on "A New Plea 
For The Interfaith 
Movement" at the 10:30 
a.m. service. The choir will 
sing under the direction of 
Arden T. Schofield and 
Joan Kirby will be the 
soloist. Greeter will be 
Chester Radden. Serving 
for the Diaconate will be 
Rod Hicks and Alpha 
Story will serve for the 
Diaconate. 

The coffee hour 
between the services will 
be hosted by Rod Hicks. 

The Early Childhood 
Sunday School session for 
children ages 2 1/2 through 
Grade 1 will meet from 
8:30 to 10 a.m. The 
intermediate group will 
meet fi^om 10 to 11:30 a.m. 

The church is equipped 
for the physically 
challenged. Members are 
asked to bring donations 
for the baskets in the 
vestibules for Fr. Bill's 
Place and the PSSB 
Pantry Shelf. 

Faith 
Lutheran 

Rev. James L. Kimmell 
will preach at the 10 a.m. 
worship service Sunday at 
Faith Lutheran Church, 
201 Granite St. All are 
welcome. 

Coffee and fellowship 
will follow. Christian 
Education for adults and 
children begins at 9 a.m. 

For more information, 
call the church office at 

472-1247. 



Thursday, February 4, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 13 



Sun Sports 



Kane Standout 
As Quincy 

Edges B-R 



Robbie Kane is one of 
Quincy High's top all- 
around athletes, standing 
out in football, basketball 
and baseball. 

The 5-8 senior last 
weelc had the finest game 
in his starry career as be 
led the Presidents' 
basketball team to a 75-74 
victory over Bridgewater- 
Raynham. 

Quincy hosted 

Falmouth last night 
(Wednesday), will be at 
Banistable Friday and will 
be home to Silver Lake 
next Tuesday night at 7 
o'clock. 

The hectic win over B- 
R improved the Presidents' 
lecoid to 5-8. 

Kane, one of the 
smallest players on the 
floor, had a career high 31 
points, along with 10 



assists, six steals and eight 
rebounds. 

The Trojans held a 40- 
34 lead at the half, but 
Kane scored 18 of his 
points in the second half to 
pull the Presidents back. 

"Robbie played a great 
game and was really 
hitting the outside shot," 
said coach John 

Franceschini. "He 
controlled the game from 
both ends and it was just a 
great night for him." 

Kane, averaging 15.4 
points a game, had four 
three-pointers, also a 
career high. 

Matt Dwyer and Tom 
Malvesti had strong two- 
way games, shutting down 
B-R in the second half. 
Mike Bartlett also had a 
solid floor game for the 
Presidents. 





QUINCY'S ROBBIE KANE goes up for two of his career- 
high 31 points against Bridgewater-Raynham in the 
Presidents' 75-74 win last week. Kane had one of the best 
games of his high school career, posting 10 assists, six 
steals and eight rebounds. 



THE PRESIDENTS' Mike Bartlett splits two 
Bridgewater-Ra3rnhani defenders as he drives to the hoop 
in the Quincy's 75-74 victory last week. The win 
Improved Quincy's record to 5-8. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 



North Having 
Rollercoaster Season 



Softball Umpire Clinic 



Any player, team, Ginny Trainor at 328-0620 

league or umpire wishing after 5 p.n»^ 
to participate in USSSA A USSSA Softball 

Softball is asked to contact Umpires Qinic will start 



this month and anyone 

wishing to attend is asked 
to contact Trainor. 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The North Quincy boys' 
basketball team is having 
a roller coaster season 
with an 8-7 record, but 
coach Ted Stevenson feels 
the Raiders are ready for a 
strong stretch drive. 

North's "overtime kids" 
(it went to three overtimes 
earlier in a loss to 
Bridgewater-Raynham) 
had to go four overtimes 
last Friday to finally edge 
Silver Lake, 64-61. 

The Raiders played at 
Taunton last night 
(Wednesday), will be 
home to Weymouth Friday 
night at 7 o'clock and will 
be at Bridgewater- 
Raynham next Tuesday 
night 

North has been involved 
in several close games, 
losing four by three points 
or less. It lost two games 
by three points, one by a 
single point and the triple 
overtime game. 

"I think the boys have 
been pressing a bit but 
they are playing fine ball 
and I think we will do all 
right the rest of the way," 
Stevenson said. 

The Lakers were ahead, 
61-60, with 1:40 left in the 
fourth overtime period but 
Bo Smith, who had 14 
points, was fouled and this 
two fiee throws put North 
infiront. 

After the Lakers missed 



two free throws, Pat Shea 
found Smith underneath for 
a fast-break layup and the 
Raiders were in. 

In the third overtime 
North was down by three 
with 18 seconds left but 
Luke Sheets (18 points) 
took a Smith pass and hit 
his first three-pointer of the 
year, tying the score at 57 
and sending the game into 
a fourth overtime. 

In double overtime, 
North found itself down, 
54-52, with six seconds 
left but Sheets passed to 
big Brian Raftery (12 
points) underneath for two 
and the game went into 
the third overtime session. 

Sean Donovan had 16 
points for North, leaving 
him just 18 points short of 
1,000 career points. If he 
didn't reach that cherished 
plateau last night, he 
should make it Friday 
night 

Stevenson came up 
with a new player to watch 
earlier in the week. 



Freshman Matt Beston hit 
a jump shot with 50 
seconds to play to cliiKh a 
63-59 victory over 
Barnstable. 

Sheets had another big 
night with 18 points, 
Donovan had 17 and 6'8" 
Jason McLeod took down 
15 rebounds. 

"Beston had been 
playing fine ball for the 
junior varsity and he will 
remain with the varsity," 
Stevenson said. "He's a 
fine player with a great 
fiiture." 

Beston received the 
MVP award at the recent 
third annual Eagle Eye 
Basketball Camp at 
Boston College High 
School. 

"Sheets and Donovan 
have been scoring well all 
season and McLeod and 
Raftery (6'3", 240 lbs.) 
have rebounded well," said 
Stevenson. "Raftery is a 
real bear under the boards. 
Smith and Shea have also 
played well. All in all, the 
team has played well." 



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Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 4, 1993 



Mite House 



Pee Wee House 



Holt's 4 Goals Lead Harold Club 



Granite Rail Pizza 
defeated Campbell's Auto 
Service, 3-1, in Mite 
House League action. 

Josh Giordani, Charles 
Sorrento and Brian Lewis 
bad the goals and Billy 
McKeon had two assists 
and Ryan Conley, Brendan 
Conley and Sorrento one 
each. Matt Miller scored 
for Campbell's with Joe 
Callahan assisting. 

Samoset Pharmacy 
topped Lydon-Russell, 5-3, 
with Conrad Leger and 



Steven McGonagle scoring 
two goals each and Brian 
O'Hanley one. Steven 
Romanowski, Joe 
Cunningham and Billy 
Ryan had two assists 
apiece and Mike Maloney, 
O'Hanley, Leger and Alex 
Booker one each. 

Matt Holt's four goals 
led the Paul Harold Club 
over Purdy's Ice Cream, 
10-0. Ryan Barry and 
Brian Stock scored two 
goals apiece and Matt 
Gregory and Mark 
Tetreault one each. 



Tommy Hughes had six 
assists, Barry and Stock 
four apiece, Gregory three 
and Holt, Rene Lumaghini 
and Pat Maxey one each. 
Goalie Tim McMahon 
recorded the shutout. 

Neponset Valley Survey 
defeated Barry's Deli, 6-1, 
as Steve Goff and Peter 
Turowski had two goals 
apiece and Ryan Graeber 
and Pat Lahar one each. 
Turowski had an assist. 
Matt Germain scored for 
Barry's. 



Bantam B2s Qualify For Tourney 



Quincy's Bantam B2 
hockey team qualified for 
the state championships by 
defeating Charlestown, 4- 
1, in the open division. 

J.J. Farrell, Rich 
Perona, Billy Barron and 
John Manning scored the 
goals and John Hasson, 
Matt Radzevich, Farrell, 
Barron and Manning bad 
assists. Goalie Tim 
Sheehan played well in 
goal. 



Quincy topped 

Brookline, 6-3, with 
Radzevich having two 
goals and Farrell, 
Manning, Chris Grant and 
John Ryan one apiece. 
Farrell, Jeff Spear, 
Radzevich and Manning 
had two assists apiece and 
Ryan and Grant one each. 

Quincy also defeated 
Dorchester, 9-1, sparked 
by Grant's four goals and 
an assist. Barron had two 
goals and Farrell, Spear, 



and Perona one each. 
Manning had three assists, 
Jenna Nolan two and 
Hasson and Bruce 
Stenberg one each. 
Radzevich made his debut 
in goal and had an 
outstanding game. 

Quincy tied Dedham, 4- 
4, with Grant having a hat 
trick and Manning the 
other goal. Farrell had 
three assists and Manning, 
Nolan, Perona and 
Stenberg one each. 



Sacred Heart Basketball 



By JOE HERN 

More than 150 boys and 
girls are enrolled in the 
Sacred Heart basketball 
program 5-7 year-old 
division. 

The following are 
showing steady 

improvement: 

5-year-olds: Kaitlyn 
Vey, Kerry Page, Matt 
McHugh, Andy Donovan, 
Jimmy Connor, Jennifer 
Lorenz, Laura Hem and 
Kristen OToole. 

6-year-olds: Nick 
Anderson, Tom Peterson, 
Michael Dolbeare, 
Katelyn Murphy, Michelle 
Nicholson, Jimmy Burke, 
Laura Davis, Lauren 
Harper, Alex Cadogan and 
Dorothy Jones. 

7-year-olds: Leanne 
Neenan, John Noren, Daryl 
Costa, Colby Morrissey, 
Sharon Leiman, Timmy 
Dugan, Chris Dolbeare and 
Michael Gibbons. 

The results of the latest 
games: 

Rookie Girls (8-10): 
The Dalmations defeated 
the Dazzling Dribblers, 6- 
4, with Alison McGrath, 
Jessica Crehan and Monita 
Chiu standing out on 
defense. Liz Furlong had 
both baskets for the 
Dribblers, Erin Croke 
played strong defense and 
Marissa Lentini did some 
fine passing. 

The Lightning Bolts 
topped the Mighty 
Midgets, 16-13, with 
Melissa Spezzano having 
a good two-way game and 
Denise Harter and Kelling 
Manning having good 
defensive games. Alicia 
Bell scored seven points. 
Shannon O'Connell had 
four and Sheila Foley two. 

The Celtics defeated 
the Hip Hoopsters, 14-11, 
with Jackie Suprey, Rose 
Zerrigan and Christine 



Plourde in key roles. 
Melissa Vey, Melissa 
Doyle and Michelle 
Maguire had strong games. 

College Girls (11-12): 
BC downed Providence, 
22-12, with Lisa OToole 
and Barrie Koch leading 
the offense and Beth 
McNally the defense. Kate 
Lavery led the scoring and 
Alanna McDonough and 
Lauren Shield were 
standouts on defense for 
Providence. 

Georgetown topped 
Notre Dame, 13-7. Lauren 
Liuzzo was high scorer, 
Theresa Ryan played solid 
defense and Barbara Ryan 
had a number of assists. 
For Notre Dame Marcia 
Hern dominated the 
boards, Katie Lynch 
played fine defense and 
Katie Cadogan had several 
steals. 

Rookie Boys (8-9): The 
Blue Devils came fi'om 
behind to top the Magic, 
16-13. John Fidalgo played 
excellent defense and had 
several key rebounds. 
Ryan Graeber had two 
baskets and three assists 
and Kostas Blathras 
played his best game of 
the season. Raymond Chu, 
Billy Croke and Casey 
Hill turned in fine 
performances for the 
Magic. 

The 76ers downed the 
Celtics, 26-19, with Tom 
Buckley leading the 
offense, Brian Kenny 
grabbing key rebounds and 
Keith Dykens playing fine 
defense. For the Celtics 
Kenny Lee was strong on 
defense, Eric Magirmis on 
ball handling and Gabriel 
Ho displayed fine hustle. 

The Hawks defeated the 
Bulls, 34-16, with Timmy 
Nelson leading the 
scoring, Phil Oliveria on 
rebounding and ball 
handling and Ron Leung 



hustling after every loose 
ball. Pat Alessi was 
impressive at point guard, 
Joslin Adler rebounded 
well and Terrance Nolan 
scored six points. 

College Boys (10-11): 
The Blue Devils turned 
back a strong Hurricane 
bid to take a 28-24 
decision. The Devils, hit 
hard by injuries, were led 
by Kevin Lynch's defense 
and the fine play of Todd 
White and Jason London. 

The Pitt Panthers 
topped the Tar Heels, 23- 
19, with an excellent 
comeback. Matt O'Malley, 
Brian Purcell and Matt 
Joyce played strong games 
for the Panthers. 

The Wolverines 
defeated the Fighting Irish, 
21-14. 

Boys Pro (12-13): The 
Celtics mastered the 
Magic, 29-26, with Mark 
Lawn scoring 13 points, 
Robert Bowes played fine 
defense and Adam 
Radzevich having four 
rebounds and three steals. 

CYO Boys: The Sacred 
Heart Crusaders divided 
the weekly doubleheader. 
In the first game. Sacred 
Heart came alive in the 
fourth with 18 points but it 
was too little, too late as 
St. Ann's posted a 32-23 
victory. Brian Littlewood 
and Jeff West led the 
Sacred Heart defense and 
Matt Doyle the offense. 
Mike Connolly was the 
outstanding player for St. 
Ann's. 

In the second game. 
Sacred Heart edged St. 
Joseph's, 38-35, with Jeff 
Jones, Steve Rayne and 
Tim Hannon sparking the 
Crusaders, while Mike 
Caporale, led St. Joseph's. 
The Crusaders coaches 
cited Desmond Lui for an 
excellent all-around effort. 



Ryan's 5 Goals 
Spark Morrissey, 12-5 



The Mike Morrissey 
Club holds a two-ppoint 
lead in the Pee Wee 
House League following a 
12-5 victory over Colonial 
Federal. 

Mike Ryan exploded for 
five goals to lead 
Morrissey, John Baron had 
a hat trick, Scott Cooper 
two goals and Brian Gates 
and Brian Degan one each. 
Pat McGann and Ryan had 
three assists, Bobby 
Harvey two and Pat 
Coughlin, Cooper and 



Squirt House 



Matt McDonough one 
each. Robbie Winter had 
two goals and Billy 
Connolly, Jimmy Hasson 
and Chris Haidul one each 
for Colonial Federal. 

Hasson bad two assists and 
Sean Fitzgerald, John 
Haddad and Haidul one 
each. 

Colonial Federal and 
Marina Bay Taxi tied, 3-3, 
with goalies Greg Burke 
and Scott Doherty 
outstanding. Hasson, Paul 
McCarthy and Haidul 



scored for Colonial 
Federal and Winter, Billy 
Graney and Hasson had 
assists. Mark Glynn, Justin 
Doty and Billy La scored 
for Marina Bay and Jason 
Snaith, Steve Verlicco, 
Glynn and Steve Wigmore 
had assists. 

All-Star Sports won by 
forfeit over Keohane's. 

The standings 

Morrissey Club, 10-3-1 
All-Star Sports, 8-3-3 
Marina Bay Taxi, 5-7-3 
Keohane's, 4-8-3; Colonial 
Federal, 3-9-4. 



Pizziferri's Hat Trick 
Powers Granite 



Burgin Plainer holds a 
one-point lead in the 
Squirt House League 
despite losing to Granite 
Auto Electric, 9-3. 

Nick Pizziferri had a 
hat trick for Granite Auto, 
Dan Kennedy two goals 
and Paul Burke, Paul 
Zenga, Mike Welch, and 
Matt O'Connell one each. 
Frank Curreri had three 
assists. Matt Reggiannini, 
Pat O'Donnell and 
Kennedy two apiece and 
Burke, Brian Sylvester, 
Duncan Devlin and Ryan 
Doyle one each. Steve 
Ford, Brian Correia and 
Billy Griffin scored for 
Burgin and Mike Sullivan, 
Stephanie Allen and Ford 



had assists. 

Doran & Horrigan 
topped Green 

Environmental, 11-5, with 
Adam Smith having a hat 
trick, Patrick O'Neill two 
goals and Robbie Bell, 
Matt Minicucci, Chris 
Lumaghini, Pat Kenney, 
Chris Lee and Chad 
Fitzpatrick one apiece. 
Lumaghini had two assists 
and Minicucci, Jeff 
Brophy and Smith one 
each. For Green Matt 
Delorey, Matt Gibbons, 
Graham McShane, Tom 
Maloney and Sean Garvey 
had the goals and Tim 
O'Connor, Mike Webber, 
Andrew Nestor and Chris 
Murphy had assists. 

Shane Kabilian and 



Paul Markarian had four 
goals apiece to lead 
Johnson Motor Parts over 
The Quincy Sun, 11-2. 
Chris Carthas had two 
goals and Jon Healy one. 
Markarian and Carthas had 
three assists apiece, Kiva 
Tupe two and Mark Doyle 
and Steve King one each. 
John Grazioso and Dave 
Noonan had the Sun's 
goals and Martin McGrath 
and Ashley Rowerdink had 
assists. 

The standings: Burgin 
Platner, 8-3-2; Doran & 
Horrigan, 8-4-1; Quincy 
Sun, 7-6-0; Johnson Motor, 
6-6-1; Granite Auto 
Electric, 3-8-2; Green 
Environmental, 3-8-2. 



Pee Wee Bs Win District Title 



Quincy's Pee Wee 
hockey team edged 
Milton, 3-2, in a state 
playdown, to win the 
District 3 championship. 

Bill Connolly, Mike 
Sullivan and Andre Nagy 
scored the goals with 
assists for Bob Hall, Glenn 
Chase and Connolly. 

Matt McDonough, Tim 
Lewis, Pat Coughlin, Mark 



Hawes, Dan Stock and 
Chase played strong 
defense and John Masone 
played well in goal with 
19 saves. 

The fine penalty killing 
efforts of Mike Powers, 
Brad Macauley, Jonathan 
Haddad and Kevin 
Cellucci were key factors 
in the win. 

The Pee Wee Bs won 



the eighth annual Coca- 
Cola Tournament title in 
Bourne, edging Avon, 
Conn., 2-1, in the finals. 

Sullivan and Nagy had 
the goals and Cellucci and 
Macauley had assists. 

En route to the finals 
Quincy defeated West 
Bay, R.I., the Seahawks 
and the host Cape Cod 
team. 



Pee Wee B II District Champ 



Quincy's Pee Wee B n 
hockey team won the 
District 4 championship, 

edging Canton, 2-1, in the 
title game. 

Jason Snaith and Bobby 
Harvey had the goals and 
Jeff Glynn had two assists 



and Justin Doty and 
Harvey one each. 

In earlier games Quincy 
defeated Walpole, 5-0, 
Norwood, 6-1, and 
Weymouth, 8-1. 

The team's overall 
record is 15-5-6. 

Other players are Betsy 



Stone, Matt Allen, Ron 
Gamel, Kevin Regan, 
Shawn Manning, Pat 
McGann, Carlos 

Ashmanaskas, Jake 
Fleming, Sean Slattery, 
Brian Gates, Owen Nestor 
and goalie John 
Laukkanen. 



Squirt B*s Win One, Lose One 



Quincy's Squirt B 
hockey team defeated 
Dedham, 5-1, and lost to 
Pembroke, 4-2. 

In the Dedham game, 
facing Dedham's A team, 
Paul Burke scored twice 
and Matt O'Connell, Ryan 
Murray and Frank Curreri 



once each after Dedham 
had taken an early 1-0 
lead. 

Didier Alther had two 
assists and Curreri, John 
Sullivan, Chris Cullen and 
John Karsarikas one 
apiece. Domenic Papile 
and Jamie Parisi played 



fine defense and Ryan 
Krueger and Jeff Langille 
played well in goal. 

In the Pembroke game, 
facing Pembroke's A team. 
Griffin and Curreri had the 
goals with assists for 
Sullivan and Matt 
Gibbons. 



USSSA Softball Meeting Feb. 27 



The annual New 
England USSSA SoftbaU 
Regional Meeting will be 
held Saturday, Feb. 27 at 9 
a.m. at Howard Johnson's, 



Worcester. wish to attend should 

USSSA oversees men's contact Ginny Trainor, 

and women's leagues in 

Quincy. 328-0620, or Dean 

Quincy residents who McNew, (508) 534-9336. 



Hockey 



Quincy's Tourney Hopes Jolted 



Thursday, February 4, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 15 

Elks Free Throw 
Contest Winners 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The Quincy hockey 
team's hopes of qualifying 
for the state tournament for 
the first time in more than 
10 years were jolted last 
week when the Presidents 
lost a pair of 4-3 
heartbreakers to 

Bridgewater-Raynham and 
Plymouth. 

Quincy fell to 7-6-2 (4- 
5-1 in the Old Colony 
League). 

The Presidents hoped to 
snap a three-game losing 
streak last night 



(Wednesday) against 
Falmouth, will be at 
Barnstable Saturday night 
at 8 o'clock and will host 
Silver Lake next 
Wednesday night at 7:50 
at the Youth Arena. 

Plymouth started fast in 
last Saturday's game and 
took a 3-1 lead in the first 
period. The Blue Eagles 
made it 4-1 in the second. 

Sophomore Dave 
Cooper, who has been 
scoring well of late, had 
Quincy's first goal with 
Sean McArdle assisting. 



Cooper also scored the 
second goal with Jamie 
Schatzl assisting and Mark 
Gilmore had the final goal 
with Steve Provost getting 
the assist. 

Sophomore Mark Smith 
had another excellent 
game in goal with 23 
saves. 

Earlier in the week 
Bridgewater-Raynham 
edged the Presidents with 
Joe Garafalo having a hat 
trick and an assist. 

Jeff Craig, Schatzl and 
Cooper scored the Quincy 



goals with Cooper also 
having two assists. Smith 
had another good night in 
goal with 27 saves. 

"It was tough to lose 
those games as we had 
beaten both teams 
earlier," Quincy coach 
Bob Sylvia said. "But the 
boys played tough all the 
way and never gave up." 

Craig and Schatzl are 
tied for the team scoring 
lead with 29 points each 
and Cooper has come up 
fast and now has 23 points. 
All are among the OCl 
leaders. 




North Blanks Silver Lake, 6-0 



CITY CHAMPIONS in the Elks National Free Tlirow 
Contest. Front row, from left, Josepii Sudak, Barbara 
Ryan, Lauren Doyle, Colleen Kelly. Back row, 
Recreation Director Barry Welch, Brian Deshler, Mike 
Travers, and Ed Miller, Hoop Shoot chairman, Quincy 
Lodge of Elks. The event Is sponsored by the Quincy 
Lodge of Elks and supervised by the Quincy Recreation 
Department. 



The North Quincy 
hockey team turned in one 
of its strongest efforts of 
the season to blank Silver 
Lake, 6-0, last Saturday to 
improve to 8-4-1 (5-4-1 in 
the Old Colony League). 

The Red Raiders, who 
kept their hopes of another 
state tournament berth 
alive, played at Plymouth 
last night (Wednesday), 
will host undefeated 
league leader Weymouth 
Saturday night at 7:50 at 
the Youth Arena and will 
be at Bridgewater- 
Raynham next Wednesday 
night at 6. 

Mike DesRoche, the 



top scorer in the league, 
led North over Silver Lake 
with a hat trick and two 
assists. He has 33 points 
this season. 

DesRoche scored the 
first three North goals. 
Andrew Vermette assisted 
on the first, Jim Sapienza 
and A.J. Carthas on the 
second and Brian 
Fitzgerald on the third. 

Carthas scored the 
fourth goal with DesRoche 
and Sapienza assisting, 
Sapienza had the fifth with 
DesRoche assisting and 
Joe Carinci had the final 
goal with Kevin Boylen 
getting the assist. 



Sean Connolly had 
another good night in goal 
with 18 saves, several of 
them very tough, as he 
recorded his second 
shutout over the Lakers. 
The Raiders had 35 shots 
on goal. 

"We really played well 
tonight and everyone 
turned in a fine 
performance," said coach 
Tom Benson. "DesRoche 
had another outstanding 

game and Connolly was 
strong in goal. We had a 
lot of shots on goal and 
tonight we made them pay 
off. In past games we have 



wasted an awful lot of 
shots. Their goalie (Brian 
Cole) is one of the best in 
the league." 

Earlier in the week, 
North edged Barnstable, 3- 
2, with Boylen scoring the 
game winner with 9:07 to 
play. Dennis Pateras and 
Fitzgerald assisted. 

DesRoche scored the 
first goal with Fitzgerald 
and Pateras assisting and 
Sapienza scored with 
DesRoche and Dave 
Pacino getting the assists. 

Connolly had another 
excellent game in goal 
with 25 saves. 

"TOM SULLIVAN 




SECOND AND THIRD place Hnishers in the City 
Championship in the Elks National Free Throw Contest. 
Front row, from left, Patrick Bregoli, Anne Shields, 
Caitlen Nichols, Patrick Jaehnig. Second row, Chris 
Leonard, Chris Bregoli, Danny Kelly and Mark Dunn. 
Back, Recreation Director Barry Welch, and Ed Miller, 
Hoop Shoot chairman, Quincy Lodge of Elks. 



8 To Be Inducted 



Into Quincy Hall Of Fame 



Bowling 



B. Saluti's 108 
Sets St. John's Pace 



Eight players will be 
inducted into the Quinc) 
High Hockey Hall of Fame 
at the annual inductioc 
diimer, March 13 at the 
Quincy Sons of Italy Hall, 
Quarry St. 

The new inductees will 
be Jack Burke, 1951; John 
Chiavaroli and Gene 



Nattie, 1962; Mik 
Haynes, 1964; Mike 
Furey, 1979; Chuckie 
Peterson, 1970; Ted Walsh 
and Kevin Craig, 1982. 

Special awards will be 
given to Ace Abboud and 
Beverly Reinhardt, 
manager of the Quincy 
Youth Arena. 



A social hour from 6:30 
to 8 p.m. will be followed 
by dinner and the 
induction ceremonies. 

Tickets are $20 per 
person and can be 
purchased at the door or by 
contacting George 
Peachey, 83 Assabet 
Road, Quincy, 479-2881, 
or Dick Vacce at Leon's 



Finer Cut, 27 Cottage 
Ave., 472-9882. 

Any former player 
unable to attend is asked 
to give a donation to help 
support the scholarship 
fund. Checks should be 
made payable to the 
Quincy High School 
Hockey Hall of Fame 
Committee. 



Kiwanis Tourney Opens Feb. 15 



Bob Saluti continues to 
lead St. John's Holy Name 
Bowling League with a 
108.31 average, followed 
by John Grande at 103.04. 

The rest of the Top Ten: 
Mike Priscella, 100.48; 
Don Gilliland, 99.63; Jim 
Mastrantonio, 96.38; Joe 
Matarazzo, 92.62; Ken 
Vamura, 91.56; Dan Dieso, 
91.36; Bud McAllister, 
91.24; Joe Zaccbeo, 90.55. 

Zaccheo rolled the 
weekly high single of 124 



and Saluti had 121. Saluti 
bad the high three of 334, 
Zaccheo rolled 316 and 
Grande 313. 

Mastrantonio's team 
bad the high team single 
of 391 and Saluti had 385. 
Saluti had the high team 
three of 1,117 and 
Matarazzo had 1,094. 

The standings: Saluti, 
14-2; Zaccheo, 12-4; 
Mastrantonio, 8-8; 
Matarazzo, 8-8; Grande, 4- 
12; PrisceUa, 2-14. 



Quincy Kiwanis Club's 
20th annual Youth Hockey 
Tournament Opens 
Monday, Feb. 15 with 
teams from four divisions, 
Pee Wees, Mites, Squirts 
and Bantams, competing. 

The week-long AHA 
sanctioned "A" 

tournament will take place 
at the Quincy Youth 
Hockey Arena Memorial 
Drive, Quincy, during 
school vacation week, 
Rb. 15-21. 

Teams will be 
competing from California, 
Pennsylvania, Connecticut 
and New Hampshire as 
well as several from 
Greater Boston and the 
jputh Shore including 



Billerica, Mansfield, 
Natick, Everett, 

Winchester, Pembroke, 
Avon/Stoughton, South 
Boston, Walpole, 
Wellesley, Waltham, 
Dorchester and Quincy. 

A pass, good for 
admission to all games 
throughout the week can 



be purchased at the door or 
from any Kiwanis member 
for $5. Single admission at 
the door is $3 and $1 for 
students 12 to 18 years. 
Children under 12 are 
admitted free. 

Proceeds will provide 
scholarships, camperships, 
financial assistance to 



families in need who are 
referred by school 
guidance personnel as well 
as support for the Kiwanis 
Pediatric Trauma Center 
in Boston. 

For specific times of 
games and more 
information call Bev 
Reinhardt at 479-8371. 



NEWSCARRIERS^ 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home deilvery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



II SUBSCRIPTION FORM 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 






1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



.STATE- 



2IP- 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



L 



( ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY 

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$14.00 
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( ) CHECK ENCLOSED 
( ) PLEASE BILL ME 



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Quincy, North Winter 
Home Sports Schedule 



Feb. 3 thru Feb. 9 



Wednesday, Feb. 3 

QHS boys basketball vs. Falmouth, 5:30 JV, 
7:00 V. 
NQHS girls basketball vs. Taunton, 5:30 JV, 

7:00 V. 

• QHS hockey vs. Falmouth, 5:30 V, 7:50 JV. 

Thursday, Feb. 4 

• NQHS boys swimming vs. Middleboro. 

Friday, Feb. 5 

• NQHS boys basketball vs. Weymouth, 3:30 
freshman, 5:30 JV, 7:00 V. 

• QHS girls basketball vs. Bamstable, 5:30 
JV, 7:00 V. 

Saturday, Feb. 6 

• NQHS hockey vs. Weymouth, 6:40 JV, 7:50 
V. 

Monday, Feb. 8 

• No home games scheduled. 

Tuesday, Feb. 9 

• QHS boys basketball vs. Silver Lake, 3:30 
freshman. 5:30 JV, 7:00 V. 

• NQHS girls basketball vs. Bridgewater/ 
Raynham, 3:30 freshman. 5:30 JV. 7:00 V. 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 4, 1993 



Wrestling 



Quincy Upsets North 
In Comeback Win 



The Quincy wrestling 
team was the underdog 
last week but overcame a 
21-12 deficit to upset rival 
North Quincy, 42-26, 
pulling out several close 
matches. 

The Presidents 

dominated the 

middleweights and closed 
out their big win with three 
straight pins before more 
than 300 fans at the 
Quincy gym. 

"They were the 
favorites coming in, but 
we matched up and won 
the close bouts and that's 
what it comes down to," 
said Quincy coach Lou 
Venturelli. 

Quincy began its 
comeback when Damien 
Carini topped previously 
unbeaten Jeff Pillard of 
North with 38 seconds left 
at 140 pounds. 

Ashley Davis, keeping 
his unbeaten dual meet 
record intact, overcame a 
4-1 deficit at 145 to earn a 
10-9 win over Jason Getz, 
who suffered his first loss. 

Quincy's Bryan 



Gallahue (152) and North 
Quincy's Chris Hamill 
(160) traded pins and 
Quincy senior Ben 
Radcliffe came up with 
the pivotal fall. He worked 
Robert Hannaford for the 
pin to give the Presidents 
a 30-27 lead. 

"Radcliffe 's match was 
huge," VenturelU said. "If 
you were going to pick one 
match that was the 
difference it was his pin." 

After North was fined a 
point for a piece of thrown 
equipment, Quincy senior 
Dave Bogan put the 
finishing touches by 
pinning Rick MacVarish 

with 11 seconds left in 
their second period of their 
199-pourKi match. 

"MacVarish, usually in 
the 171 pound class, 
bumped up," said North 
coach Steve Joyce. 
"Normally he would have 
no problem at 171, but 
Bogan is very strong and 
he got caught up by that 
strength. Pillard also 
bumped up to 140 and that 



was his first dual meet 
loss." 

North's James 

O'Connell (112) and 
Franny Bellotti (130) had 
quick pins. 

Other Quincy wiimers 
were Mark Froehlich, Matt 
Miller, Peter Penwarden, 
and Mark Nutley. 

Other winners for North 
were Billy Chew, Paul 
Delaney and Chris Hamill. 

Last weekend Quincy 
split, defeating Brockton 
44-25, but being 
outclassed by Dedham, 55- 
9, making its record 8-9 
(2-1 in the Old Colony 
League). 

Quincy winners against 
Brockton were Miller, 
Shane O'Connor, 
Penwarden, John 

Cheverie, Carini, 
Gallaghue and Davis, who 
ran his record to 11-0. The 
only winners against 
Dedham were Froehch and 
Rich Bergeron. 

Quincy's scheduled 
meet with Weymouth was 
postponed until Tuesday, 
Feb. 16 at noon at (Quincy. 



Boosters Club To Honor 
NQHS Football Champs 



The North Quincy 
Football Boosters Club 
will hold its annual 
banquet honoring the 
undefeated football team 
and cheerleaders this 



Sunday at 6:30 at the Sons 
of Italy Hall. Diimer will 
be served promptly at 7 
o'clock. 

The football squad had 
the best season in history. 



finishing with an 11-0 
record, winning the Old 
Colony League title and 
the Division IB Super 
Bowl championship, 
defeating Arlington. 



Executive Hockey 



Bearing, Flibotte Win; 
Adams, Grumpy's Tie 



Scott Richardson scored 
two goals to lead South 
Shore Bearing over Fowler 
House, 5-3, in Quincy 
Executive Hockey League 
action Monday night at the 
Youth Arena. 

Jay Powers, Tom Cahill 
and Steven Dyment had a 
goal each. Frankie Guest 
had three assists, Cahill 
two and Bob Carroll one. 
Ed Mullen, John Farren 
and John Ryan scored for 
Fowler House with Don 
Perdios, Rich Gibbs, Steve 
Blaser and Mullen having 
assists. 

Adams Sports and 
Grumpy's Pub tied, 2-2. 
Mark Giordani scored the 
tying goal for Adams with 
four minutes left. Mike 
Flaherty also scored for 
Adams and Chuck Behena 
and John Yaxter had 



assists. For Grumpy's Rick 
Joyce and Dick McCabe 
had the goals, both 
unassisted. 

Flibotte Auto Sales 
edged Beacon Sports, 3-2, 
with Jim MuUaney, Dick 
Patten and Jim Cooney 
having the goals. Bob 
Boyle and Skip 
Managanaro scored for 
Beacon with assists for 
Mike Boyle and Bruce 
Connell. 

In earlier games John 
Norton scored two goals, 
including the game-winner 
with 1:09 to play, as 
Flibotte's Auto Sales 
edged South Shore 
Bearing, 3-2. 

South Shore took the 
lead with two goals in the 
first period by Scott 
Richardson and Don 
Bonito, with Tom Cahill 




**Rockm into the 90*8" 

D.J. STEVE KAVANAGH 
Music for all Occasions 



**Mu$ic for people who 

take their fun $eriou$lyr 

773.4936 



having an assist. Mark 
Paolucci scored foi 
Flibotte with Norton 
assisting and midway in 
the second period Norton 
tied it up, with Jim 
Mullaney assisting. The tie 
held until Norton's winning 
goal with Paolucci getting 
the assist. 

Beacon Sports defeated 
Grumpy's Pub, 6-2, with 
Kevin Jago scoring two 
goals and adding an assist. 
Jack Valle, Art Boyle, 
Mike Boyle and Artie 
Boyle also scored for 
Beacon. Skip Manganaro 
and Artie Boyle bad two 
assists apiece and Dennis 
Bertoni, Miek Boyle and 
Valle one each. Paul 
Veneziano had both goals 
for Grumpy's and Kevin 
Harnett had an assist. 

Doug McLean scored 
twice to lead Adams 
Sports over Fowler House, 
S-3. Chuck Behenna, Mark 
Giordano and John Yaxter 
also scored for Adams and 
Giordani, Yaxter and Mike 
Flaherty had assists. John 
Fanen had two goals and 
Ed Linefaan one for Fowler 
House and Fairen, Rich 
Gibbs, Linehan and Jim 
Cooso had assists. 



Seamans Seeking Pledges 
For 'Ski For Sight' 



Quincy residents may 
still make pledges for the 
Waterville Valley "Ski For 
Sight" Ski-A-Thon to help 
newly bUnd persons. 

Bob Seamans of Quincy 
will take part in a 24-hour 
Cross Country Ski-A-Thon, 
Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 
27 and 28 at Waterville 
Valley, N.H., to benefit 
The Carroll Center for the 
BUnd. 

Seamans, who intends 
to ski for 24 straight hours, 
invites others to join him if 
only for a few miles. His 
wife June will ski a few 
miles during the event. He 
is a member of the board 
of directors of The Carroll 
Center for the Blind. 

"I know I can last the 
24 hours," Seamans said. 
He added that he should 
be able to do it if the 
weather is okay. Seamans 
estimates he will ski about 
four miles each hour. 

Skiers are presently 
seeking pledges-per-mile 
from individuals and 
organizations. To make a 




BOB SEAMANS 

pledge on behalf of 
Seamans contact Arthur 
O'Neill at the Carroll 
Center, 969-6200. 
Contributions are tax 
deductible. 

"If people can pledge 
anything, from a nickel to 
a buck, whatever, it will 
help," Seamans said. 

The Carroll Center for 
the Blind provides 
comprehensive rehab- 
ilitation services to newly 
blinded adults and other 
visually impaired persons, 
enabling them to achieve 



independence, self- 
sufficiency, and self 
fulfillment. 

"The staff at the Carroll 
Center counsels newly 
blinded adults on how to 
cope. The staff teaches 
them how to live day-to- 
day... how to cook, iron 
clothes, etc.," Seamans 
said. 

He added that the 
Carroll Center serves 
hundreds of people each 
year and Quincy residents 
are eligible for the 
Center's programs. 

Seamans said the 
public is welcome to come 
and join the fun-filled 
event which includes free 
skiing. 

Sports and entertain- 
ment personalities are 
expected at the event 
which will be held on an 
easy one-mile, double- 
track flat loop for conven- 
tional and skating styles. 

Raffle prizes will be 
awarded to skiers seeking 
pledges and long sleeve t- 
shirts will be presented to 
all participants. 



Fund Established For 
Soccer Player's Tour 



City Councillors Peter 
Kolson and Michael 
Cheney and State Rep. 
Stephen Tobin announce 
the establishment of the 
Brian M. Fitzgerald 
International Soccer Fund. 

The fund is being 
established for Fitzgerald, 
a North Quincy High 
School senior who has 
been selected to be part of 
an international soccer 
team that will tour 
England and Scotland. The 
fund committee is seeking 
financial support from 
organizations and 
inchviduals to help raise 
the $4,000 needed to pay 
for the tour. 

Fitzgerald, a lifelong 
Quincy resident, came up 
through the ranks of 



Quincy Youth Soccer and 
served as a captain of the 
NQHS soccer team this 
past season, earning team 
MVP honors. He plans to 
continue his education and 
hopes to play soccer on a 
college level. 

"This is probably a 
once-in-a-Ufetime 
opportunity for Brian, but 
like so many things, the 
obvious drawback is the 
financial burden," said 
Kolson, who serves as 
chairman of the 
committee. "We are proud 
to form this committee in 
an effort to bring this 
dream to reahty." 

Other committee 
members include Rev. 
Richard DeVeer, pastor of 
St. Boniface Church; 



Charlene McDonald, 
director of the 
Germantown Neighborhood 
Center; and Mary 
Fitzgerald, Brian's mother. 

Those wishing to make 
a donation should make 
checks payable to the 
Brian M. Fitzgerald 
International Soccer Fund, 
c/o Rev Richard DeVeer, 
St. Boniface Rectory, 26 
Shed St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 

Organizational 
contributions will be 
recognized with a 
certificate suitable for 
framing. Individual 
contributions will be 
personally recognized. 

For more information 
contact Kolson, Cheney, 
or Mary Fitzgerald. 



Recreation Department 
Participating In Boston 
Celtics Basketball Clinic 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department will 

participate in the 
distribution of tickets to 
the Boston Celtics' 
Basketball Clinic to be 
conducted at Boston 
Garden. 

This year's event is 
sponsored by The Boston 
Globe and the Red 
Auerbach Youth 

Foundation Sunday, March 
14 at 4:30 p.m. 

The free clinic will 
feature a special 
appearance by Larry Bird, 
current Boston Celtic 



players and the coaching 
staff. 

Tickets are fi-ee. This is 
an opportunity to learn tips 
on rebounding, shooting 
and defense from the pros. 
Any Quincy residents or 
youth organizations 
interested in obtaining 
tickets can call the Quincy 
Recreation Department at 
376-1394. 

Tickets are limited and 
requests will be filled on a 
first come, first serve 
basis. Family groups are 
encouraged to attend this 
event. Ticket requests 



should include a request 
for an adult for each four 
tickets requested. 

Participants are 
responsible for their own 
transportation. The clinic 
is one hour long. 

The Auerbach Youth 
Foundation is a permanent 
endowment to promote 
recreation and youth 
development opportunities 
and athletic events 
throughout Massachusetts. 

For more information 
call the Quincy Recreation 
Department at 376-1394. 



Red Cross Blood Drives At Area Colleges 



The South Area Office 
of the American Red Cross 
announces the addition of 
two blood drives to its 
February schedule. 



Friday, Feb. 19: 

Eastern Nazarene College, 
25 East Elm Ave., 
Wollaston, ikkmi to S p.m. 
Thursday, Feb. 25: 



Quincy College Drive at 
Bethany Church, 18 Spear 

St., Quincy Center, 9 a.m. 
to2pjn. 



Thursday, February 4, 1993 Qnincy Saa Page 17 



Turns Attacker' s Face Green 



Dye Spray Foam 

Newest 
Robbery Defense 



Rape. 



Business & Real estate 



Phyllis Rudnick Regional 
MAR Vice President 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

"Calling all cars: Be on 
the lookout for a man with 
a green face." 

Police radio alerts for 
muggers and other 
lawbreakers in the Quincy 
area could soon be that 
brief now that the self- 
defense product known as 
DYEWitness is available 
to residents of the South 
Shore. 

DYEWitness, which 
was developed by former 
Canadian police officer 
James McCreary, shoots a 
green Uquid that foams up 
on contact and stains a 
person's skin and clothing 
for an average of seven 
days. One DYEWitness 
container is roughly the 
size of a can of Mace and, 
when squeezed, is entirely 
discharged in seven 
seconds. 

Andrea Ciccone of 
Quincy, a receptionist for 
Devine & Pearson Inc., 
sells the product part-time 
from her home. She said 
McCreary first came up 
with the idea for 
DYEWitness after he 
became frustrated with the 
constant difficulties he 
experienced trying to 
obtain positive 

identifications on various 
criminals. 

"I think it's a great 
product," said Ciccone. 
"It's guaranteed to leave a 
person's face with a green 
stain for a minimum of 
three to four days, and 
sometimes stains for a 
week or more, depending 
on the person's skin type." 

So if a woman is 
attacked, for instance, and 
the attacker is sprayed 
with DYEWitness, police 
will know that they are 
looking for someone with a 
green face. 

Ciccone said she also 
likes the product because 
while it can halt an attack, 
it will not completely 
incapacitate an attacker 
the way Mace would. 

"It comes out with 70 
pounds (per-square inch) 
of pressure, so it will 
knock an attacker back," 





ON IMPACT 




After 4 Seconds 




both by the Food and Drug 
Administration (FDA) and 
Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration 
(OSHA). 

She added that since, 
unlike Mace, DYEWitness 
contains no gases and is 
non-toxic, it is not 
considered to be a weapon. 
For this reason, a firearm 
identification (F.I.D.) card 
is not required for a person 
to carry die product. 

DYEWitness has been 
distributed through Pure 
Life International 
Products, Inc. in Canada 
since it first went on the 
market in 1990. The 
United States 

distributorship, which is 
handled by Royal Body 
Care Inc. in Dallas, Texas 
began in 1991. 

Locally, the product is 
now available in select 
locations such as the 
Harvard Square Coop in 
Cambridge, the Boston 
University Campus Store, 
the Carey Hill Flea 
Market in Brockton, and 
through individuals such as 
Ciccone who sell from 
their homes. 

DYEWitness can cost 
as httle as $19.95 ($21.25 
including shipping and 
tax) if one were to 
purchase it from Ciccone 
and as much as $40 when 
bought at the BU campus 
store. The reason for the 
difference is that Royal 
Body Care sells 
distributorship of 
DYEWitness through a 
method called Multi-Level 
Marketing (MLM) which 
allows smaller vendors to 
charge virtually whatever 
price they can get for the 
product. 

While even $19.95 may 



Phyllis Rudnick, co- 
owner of Century Annex 
Realty in Quincy, has 
been elected a regional 
vice president of the 
Massachusetts Association 
of Realtors (MAR) for 
1993. 

As vice president for 
the South Shore region, 
Rudnick will coordinate 
association objectives and 
activities within the 
Attleboro area, Greater 
Brockton, North Bristol 
County, Plymouth County 
and Quincy & South Shore 
Board of Realtors, and 
meet regularly with local 
and regional leadership to 
discuss real estate industry 
issues of statewide 
importance. 

She automatically 
becomes a member of the 
MAR Executive 

Committee and Board of 
Directors as a result of her 
election as a regional vice 
president. 

Prior to being elected, 
Rudnick had served as an 
MAR state director from 
1989 to 1992. She also is a 
former member of the 
MAR Education, Equal 




PHYLLIS RUDNICK 

Opportunity, Inaugural & 
Convention and Realtor 
Community Service 
Committees, and a past 
participant in the state 
association's Realtor Day 
on Beacon Hill activities. 

On the local level, 
Rudnick is an active 
member of the Quincy & 
South Shore Board of 
Realtors' Personnel, 
Professional Standards, 
and Strategic Planning 



Opportunity, Library, 
Nominating, Multiple 
Listing Service and 
Realtor Community 
Service Committees in the 
past. 

A Realtor since 1983, 
Rudnick is an active 
member of the Women's 
Council of Realtors and 
the South Shore Chamber 
of Commerce's Real 
Estate Committee. She 
was honored as the Quincy 
&. South Shore Board's 
Realtor of the Year in 
1987, and has earned her 
Graduate, Realtors 
Institute (GRI) and 
Certified Residential 
Specialist (CRS) 

professional designations. 

Organized in 1924, the 
Massachusetts Association 
of Realtors is a voluntary 
trade organization with 
more than 15,000 
members. The term 
"Realtor" is registered as 



Committee this year. She the exclusive designation 
previously served as of members of the 
president of the Quincy & National Association of 



South Shore Board of 
Realtors in 1991, and has 
also chaired the local 
Board's Education, Equal 



Realtors who subscribe to 
a strict code of ethics and 
enjoy continuing education 
programs. 



Moakley To Speak At 
Chamber Breakfast Feb. 12 



Congressman Joseph 
Moakley will be the 
featured speaker at the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce 7:44 Breakfast 
Friday, Feb. 12 at 7:44 
a.m. at Lombardo's in 
Randolph. 

Kevin Costello, 
government affairs 



manager for the Chamber, 
said Moakley is expected 
to express his views on 
working with the new 
President, the new 
Congress, and also with 



South Shore; and how be 
looks forward to working 
with the South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Tickets for the breakfast 
are $12 for members ($110 



After 7 Seconds 
said Ciccone. "It will 
temporarily sting a 
person's eyes, but will not 
really harm someone." 

Ciccone said that 
DYEWitness is composed 
of various vegetable dyes, 

formaldehyde, and ^ 

surfactant, an agent product that can only be y^^^ elected president of 
commonly found in soaps used once, Ciccone said ^^ q^^ College Alumni 

that "it's reaUy only a one- Association Board of 



Charles 
Mansfield, 



the Massachusetts Water 

Resources Authority; how for tables of 10) and $20 

the issues and policies wiU for non-members. For 

impact businesses on the reservations caU 479-1111. 

Charles Ross Elected President 
Of Curry College Alumni Board 

Perry Normal School, 



Ross of 
well-known 



The 
meets 



Alumni Board 
on campus and 



seem a large amount for a local radio personaUty, has represenits all alumni of "^^^^^^[1^1^°^^^^^ 



Curry College and the 



and shampoos. She noted 
that the surfactant is what 
causes DYEWitness to 
foam up and sting an 
attacker's eyes. 

Ciccone stressed that 
DYEWitness is a 
completely legal product 
that has been approved 



QHS 



Cadet Drill 
Team Off To Good Start 

The Quincy High Archer, C/Capt. Colon, 

School Air Force Junior C/SSgt. Jamie Ackles, 

ROTC Cadet Drill Team, C/Sr.A. Russell Salcedo, 

two-time regional C/lLt. Dennis Greeley, 

champions, has taken first C/lLt. Julie Lai, and 

place in its initial drill C/Maj. Dennis Lawrence, 
competition 



Association Board 
time fee once you buy it." Directors. 
When one uses 

DYEWitness against an A 1972 graduate with a 
attacker, she explained, bachelor of arts degree in 
that person can send a communication and 
copy of the police report government, Ross is the 
(regarding the attack) to manager of telemarketing 
Royal Body Care and the 
company will send the 
victim another 

DYEWitoess container for 
no charge. 

For more information 
regarding the product, call 
Ciccone at 471-0389. 



for the National Fire 
Protection Association in 

Quincy. The Quincy 
native also serves as a 
staff announcer/sports 
broadcaster at WJDA radio 
in Quincy. 



In addition the Quincy 
High Color Guard placed 
second in its category, 
while C/Capt. Milagro 
Colon placed third in 
individual drill for females. 

The Drill Team is 
commanded by C/lLt. 
Scott Mercurio. Members 
include C/Lt.Col. Brian 
Laroche, C/Maj. Sue 
Mackay, C/Capt. Jabette 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Teiephone: 
471-3100 



DYE Witness- 
Criminal identifier 

$19.95 

Call (617) 471-0389 



DYE WiDiess is * foaming green dye tha sprays 70 lbs. of pressure a an flucte, 
sdnging the eyes »d nose and covehng the Eace widi die coisiaancy of diiving crean 
saining ifae boe far tf) 10 7 dayi Tins idenifies yov OKker nl plHXS them a dK 
scene of the dime. It's govenunea and Odia appioved-an F.LD. caid is not reqiired. 
DYE Wjooi otMw Ifi chemicals, the dye is nwle fion vegcobles. k is a safe rncaa 
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Page 18 Qaincy Sun Thursday, February 4, 1993 



ittttitttmmmmtMttmtttititmtttttttmmtmit 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norlolk Division 

Docket No. 93P0221E1 
Estate of LILLIAN G. 
YOUNG late of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that 
CAROLINE YOUNG of 
WEYMOUTH in the County 
of NORFOLK and 
BARBARA YOUNG of 
PEMBROKE in the County 
of PLYMOUTH be 
appointed executors 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

H you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on March 10, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may alk>w) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-ninth 
day of January, one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
RaglstM' of Probate 

2/4/93 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P0193E1 
Estate of LAWRENCE A. 
LAMB late of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that 
LAWRENCE LAMB, Jr., of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on March 10, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty- fifth 
day of January, one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
R*gl«tM' of Probate 
2/4/93 



jlljliliilllillji 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

DocketNo. 93P0181E1 
Estate of FLORENCE C. 
SMITH late of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent by proved and 
allowed and that ADRIENNE 
C. HAM of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executrix named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney shouki file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 
in the forenoon on March 10, 
1993. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the 
Court, on motion with notice 
to the petitioner, may allow) 
in accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of 
said Court at Dedham, the 
twenty-fifth day of January, 
one thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Radiator of Probate 

2/4/93 

Save Gat and Money 
Shop Locally 



Danh Nguyen 
On Dean's List 

Danh T. Nguyen of 
North Quincy has been 
named to the Dean's List 
for the fall semester at 
North Shore Community 
College, Danvers. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE 

AND FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

DocketNo. 93 P0162A1 
Estate of SAVERIA M. 
ALMON AKA: SALLY 
ALMON late of SAN JOSE, 
CALIFORNIA having 
property in QUINCY In the 
County of NORFOLK. 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that FRANCIS J. 
SANTORELLI of 

WEYMOUTH in the County 
of NORFOLK be appointed 
administrator of said 
estate without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
March 10, 1993. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-fifth 
day of January, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Roglator of Probate 
2/4/93 



Mariano Opposes 
Educational Reform Bill 



"T 



lili!<lM lIK llillllll 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

1 305 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY, MA 021 69 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and 
delivering to the City of Quincy: 

PURCHASING DEPT.: USED POLICE & CITY 
VEHICLES & EQUIPMENT, FEBRUARY 22, 1993 @ 
10:00 A.M. 

SCHOOL DEPT.: (1) SINGLE SPINDLE SHAPER, 
FEBRUARY 22, 1993 @ 10:30 A.M. 

SCHOOL DEPT.: FALL ATHLETIC SUPPLIES, 
FEBRUARY 22, 1 993 @ 1 1 :00 A.M. 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the 
Purchasing Agent, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date 
and any allowable discounts. 

Rrm bid prices will be given first consideration and will 
be received at the office of the Purchasing Agent until 
the time and date stated above, at which time and date 
they will be publicly opened and read. 

Bids must be in a sealed envelope. The outskJe of the 
sealed envelope is to be clearly marked, 'BID 
ENCLOSED' with time/date of bid call. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to 
accept any part of a bid or the one deemed best for the 
City. 

James A. Sheets, MAYOR 
Robert F. Denvir, Jr., PURCHASING AGEMT 
2/4/93 



Pound 
Adoptables 

Golden Retriever, male, 3 years, large. 
Rabies Clinic at the animal shelter, 56 
Broad St., April 24, 12 p.m.-3 p.m. Cats and dogs. 

Contact Offices Phyliif Bcrlucchi and Bruce DiBclla, 

773-«2f7, daily Ifours. I:3« ani-4:J« pm 

EicepI Sundays 



Rep. Ronald Mariano 
has voted against the 
Education Reform Bill (H. 
801) because of how it 
would affect municipal 
finances. 

"Although education 
reform is one of my 
priorities, I am extremely 
concerned about what this 
bill does to our municipal 
finances," said Mariano. 
'The State can no longer 
put pressure on the 
property taxpayers of our 
cities and towns by 
mandating levels of 
spending." 



The bUl called for the 
City of Quincy to increase 
spending in education by 
over $4 million during the 
seven years of the 
education reform bill to be 
eligible for additional state 
aid. 

"It is unfair to pit city 
services against each 
other," said Mariano. "1 
have balanced a local 
budget and I know how 
hard it is when state 
revenues do not support 
the programs that the state 
mandates. Quincy is facing 



many difficult budget 
decisions and it would be 
irresponsible for me to ask 
the city to increase school 
spending during these 
difficult times," said 
Mariano. 

The bill has gone to the 
Senate for approval. 

"It is my hope that the 
Senate works on the 
funding portion of the bill 
and makes it easier for 
cities such as Quincy to be 
eligible for aid without 
increasing spending," said 
Mariano. 



Montclair-Wollaston Assn. Meeting Tonight 



The Montclair- 
Wollaston Neighborhood 
Association will meet 
tonight (Thursday) at 7:30 
p.m. in the Church of the 
Good Shepherd, Harvard 
and West Squantum Sts. 

Guest speaker will be 
Nancy Callanan, director 



of the Quincy Community 
Action Housing Program. 
She will discuss tenant 
rights and responsibilities, 
rental property 

management, lead paint 
poisoning, and resources 
available for deleading 
and energy conservation. 



Callanan and her staff 
will also offer one-on-one 
counseling for firtt time 
home buyers. 

Following the program, 
the monthly business 
meeting will be held. All 
residents are encouraged 
to attend. 



Ward 4 Neighborhood Assn. Meeting Feb. 9 



The Ward 4 

Neighborhood Association 
will meet Tuesday, Feb. 9 
at 7 p.m. at the Faith 
Community Center, 65 
Roberts St., South Quincy. 

Guest speaker Bob 
Curry will discuss the 



future of Quincy. Ward 4 
Councillor Thomas 
Fabrizio will also be in 
attendance to discuss the 

700-foot West Quincy 
communications tower. In 
addition, a progress report 
on the granite workers 



statue will be given. 

Refreshments will be 
served. Those planning to 
attend are asked to bring 
discarded hearing aids and 
eyeglasses for the needy. 

For more information 
call Ernest Aristide at 472- 
6312. 



Morrissey Fundraiser Feb. 9 

State Senator Michael Anthony's Pier 4, 140 donor, $50 per patron, and 

Morrissey will host a Northern Ave., Boston. may be purchased at the 

Hors d'oeuvres will be 

fundraiser Tuesday, Feb. 9 served. door or by calling 328- 

from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Tickets are $100 per 0913. 

Quincy College Governance Committee Meeting 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 

IfilQALlioTici"' 



Quiiicy College 
Governance Committee 
will meet today 

(Thursday) at 3:30 p.m. in 
the second floor 
conference room at City 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89P2924GI 
To llona K. Deering, The 
Massachusetts De- 
partment of Mental Health 
and to all persons 
interested in the estate of 
llona K. Deering of Quincy, 
in the County of Norfolk, a 
person under 

guardianship. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court by 
Edith Garrant and David 
Ames, Co-Guardians of 
said ward, llona K. 
Deering, pursuant to 
M.G.L., C. 201,s38, pray 
the Honorable Court 
approve an estate plan for 
reasons more fully set out 
in said petition. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in sakJ 
Court at Dedham before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon 
on the third day of March 
1 993, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. 
FORD, Esquire, First 
Justrce of said Court, this 
twentieth day of January 
1993. '' 

■tHOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
R«fll*t«r 
2/4/93 



■v:-:v:::::v::::v:vX-:v:y:-:-:; ;^vj^^ 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 91 P2885E1 
To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
John E. Johnson late of 
Quincy, the County of 
Norfolk. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court by 
Margaret L. Hayes, of 
Chicago in the State of 
Illinois, as creditor of the 
estate of John E. 
Johnson, brings this 
petition under the 
provisions of section 13 of 
Chapter 1 97 of the General 
Laws to retain assets for 
reasons more fully set out 
in said petition. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon 
on the third day of March 
1993, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. 
FORD, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court, this 
twenty-second day of 
January, 1993. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
R*glst*r 
2/4/93 



HaU, 1305 Hancock St. 

Dr. Judith McLaughlin 
from the Harvard 
University Graduate 
School of Education will 
speak on "College Boards 
of Trustees." 

The public is invited. 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

DocketNo. 93P0219A1 
Estate of GEORGE E. 
MOODY, JR. late of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that ROBERT M. MOODY 
of QUINCY in the County 
of NORFOLK be appointed 
administrator of said 
estate without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
March 10, 1993. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-fifth 
day of January, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
R«gl*tor of Probate 
2/4/93 



I 



Thursday, February 4, 1993 Qulncy Sun Page 19 




EVERYBODY'S MARKETPUCE 



HELPWAfiTEP 



SERVICiS 



SEBVICES 



^i^mmmii iriinii 



SERVICES SERViaES 



A&T VACUUM 

•19.95 Overhaul Special on 
any vacuum 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 
•Sharpening 

(scissors, knives, etc.) 
•Oreck XL Vacuums $249 

• Electrolux w/power nozzle 

$199. 

• Used vacuums $45 & if> 

27BealeSt.,Wollaston 
47»-5066 TF 



«.il..MM*.*WMMMMM*M*MM*4*MMM^^MM* 

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For 



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TAX RETURNS 

Very Very Low Rates 

Richard C. McDonough, EA 

Professional Service 

in Your Home 
20 Years Experience 
472-2694 4,5 



CHRISTIAN DATING 

& FRIENDSHIP 

SERVICE 

Free Information packet 
1-800-829-3283 2/4 



TRAVEL AGENCY 
F/T POSITIONS 

We're growing! Over 100 years of service as 
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the South Shore. Also ACCOUNTING 
CLERICAL POSITION for organized person 
to assist with multi tasks in our acct. dept. 
Knowledge of ADS system a plus. Pleasant 
south shore location at the junctions of Rt. 1 
and Rte 128. Salaries commensurate with 
experience. Excellent Travel Opportunities. 
Send or call (before faxing) a cover letter, 
resume and salary requirements to: 

COLPITTS WORLD TRAVEL 
875 Providence Hwy. Dedham, MA 02026 
617-326-7800 Annette at ext 302. 2/4 



FOR RENT 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Newly Renovated 
Sona of Italy Social Center 
Golden Lion Suite 
Capacity - 300 
Venetian Room 
Capacity • 140 
Call 47^SM0 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Ouincy K of 

Building 

5 Hollis Avenue 

For information please call 

32S-S967 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings. Showers, 

Meetings, Banquets 

Elks Home, 440 E Squantum St. 

Ouincy 

472-2223 

TE 



HOUSE INSPECTORS 

No Exp. Necessary. Up 

to $800 Wkly. Will Train. 

Ca// (21 9)-769-6649 

EXT H5046 9 A.M. 

to 9 P.M. 7 days 2/11 



WORK WANTED 



Handyman 

Masonry and Carpentry a 
specialty. Many otfier jobs 
as well. Low rates. Work 
guaranteed 

Dan 479-9887 sna 



MISCELLANEOUS 



HALL FOR RENT 

Nickerson Post No. 382 

American Legion, Squantum, MA 

Handicapped AcoessUo. 

Capacity 90 or less. 

Call 328-9824 

Monday through Saturday 4-7 pm Tf 



2 HALLS FOR RENT 

George F. Bryan Post 

1 suitable for large functions 
(350+ people); other suited for 
small functions (120 people). 
Call the George F. Bryan Post 

Call 472-6234 3/4 



APT FOR RENT 

Qulncy Hospital Hill, 4+, 
good size rooms 2rxJ floor, 
excellent cond. off-street 
parking $550+util. 
871-3424 



2/11 



impact Quincy-Coalltion 
for the Prevention of Alcohol 
and other drug problems and 
Merrymount PTO Is sponsor- 
ing an Active Parenting To- 
day course at Merrymount 
School starting Wed. Feb. 10 
Call 984-8762 for details. 2/4 




THANK YOU 

ST. JUDE 
for favors granted 

AMB2M 

THANK YOU 
ST JUDE 

for favors granted 

AMB2M 



Sun 
Classified 



Ads 



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Results 



Thank You 
St. Jude 



JAMM 2/4 



THANK YOU 
ST JUDE 

for favors granted 

RR2/4 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
eitra money by iHilldIng a 
Qulncy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



P RQFESSQNAL 

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WMKMS 
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INCOME TAX PREPARATION 

Computer Generated Returns 
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Bentley Grad 
25+ Years Experience 
My office or your home 
472-6425 ^ 




EXPERT 

LAMP REPAIR 

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• doaatt. Cabinat* 

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WANTED 



HAND TOOLS 
WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tool chests, 
old hand tools, all trades 
(machinist, pattern maker, 
watchmaker, etc.) shop k>ts. 
Also, antiquarian books, 
frames, paintings. Antiques in 
estate lots. 

1-617-558-3839 tf 



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CONTROLLED CHAOS 

4714445 



2/11 



JUST $7.99/HR! 

(PLUS TRIP - $6.50 max.) Win- 
dow, carpet and housedeaning, 
leaf raking, assembly, painting, 
and much morel Joe 773-1084. 
Since 1979. Free Estimates u 



wmm. 



ARINSPECT10N& 
LEAD PAtfT REMOVAL 

Dont wait until it is too latel 
Ask us about our Super 
Winter Lead Removal and 
Inspection discount. Let our 
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workmanship quality and 
save you top dollars. Fully 
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Free Estimates. 
1-800-559-5633 3/1 1 




SIESTA SLEEP SHOP 

Mattress Warehouse Bar- 
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Opposite Reebok & BJ's 
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PRINCESS HOUSE 
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United Way 

/( brinffs oul the besl in ill oi us. 



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20 LB. TANK 

DCHANGE 

$7.99 

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4?2-t290 VOTOUMa 



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$3,500 
Ca// 471 -4046 1/28 



Typesetting Equipment 
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2 Varityper Compact 351 

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1 Selectline PermaKwik 
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BEST OFFER 

The Quincy Sun 

1372 Hancock Street 

Quincy 02169 

471-3100 



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MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN. 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 



O Servlcea 

a For Sale 

O Autos 

D Boato 

D For Rent 

O Wanted 

a Help Wanted 

O Rett, Livestock 

a Lost and Found 

a Real Estate For Sale 

D Real Estate Wanted 

a Miscellaneous 

D Work Wanted 

Antiques 

D Coins A Stamos 

a Rest Homes 

D Instruction 

Day Care 

a Personal 

Electrical A Appliances 



RATES 
IWEEK 
S-rWEBCt 

•.12 WEEKS 

ia WEEKS 

ORMOiiE 



D $5.00foroneineeftlon.upto20worda,10fforeachaddltlonalword. 

D $4.60 per Inaartlon up to 20 words for 3-7 Insertion* of the same ad, 

109 each addlttonal word. 
D $4.30 per Insertion up to 20 words for 8-12 Insertions of the san>e ad, 

10< more each additional word. 
D $4.00 per Insertion up to 20 words for 1 3 or more Insertions of the 

same ad, 10« each additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ — 
in The Ouincy Sun 



Jor the following ad to run 



-weeks 



COPY:. 



iW REFUIW WMX if MAOf AT THIt COMTIUCT RATI IN TMf EVINT OF CAMCtUATIOM. 
DCAOUNK MONDAY. MOFJL FUASC INCLUDC YOUR FHONi NUMSCR M AO. 



J 



Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 4, 1993 

N.O. Senior Citizens Meeting 

The North Quincy p.m in Quincy Community 

Senior Citizens United Methodist Church, 
Association will meet 

today (Thursday) at 12:30 ^^ ^eale St. 



1 YEARS OF TECHNOLOGY 
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Stice Updates Council On Quincy 
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< Fuel Injection Cleaning ■ Complete Belts i. Hoses 

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• Shocks t. Struts 



• Valve Adjustments 
■ Carburetor Repairs 

• Transmission Service 



Must present coupon Cannot be usfrt witn dny otncr promotion Ej^ras 2/1l>A>3 



MAINTENANCE 
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ADJUST Timing, idle & tuel-Hir 
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• R<idi^tor flush fc. refill wiin up to 
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radiiitor c<ip 

• Inspect thermost<« for proper 
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Includes: 

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Lutaricate Chassis 

Replace oil filter • Top off fluids 



Call Dealer For Details With this coupon only Explras 2/19/03 




FOR COMPLETE CAR REPAIR 

OUR TRIPLE GUARANTEE 
Price -Parts • Performance 

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City Councillors want 
to stay Informed on the 
progress of the recently 
formed Quincy College 
Govemance Committee. 



Agnitti 

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^ 



School Committee 
member Linda Stice, 
chairman of the 
Govemance Committee, 
updated the council 
Monday on the groups first 
few meetings. 

Stice asked the council 
to keep politics out of the 
process when the time 
comes for making the 
change. 

"We are trying to do 
what is best for the 
college, not the players 
involved," Stice said. 
"There is going to be a 
change in govemance. We 
want you all to focus on 
what's best for the college 
in the long haul." 

Ward 3 Councillor 
Larry Chretien, who also 
serves on the Govemance 



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Committee, said, if 
circumstances wanant, he 
wants the city to be 
compensated for property 
and work done for the 
college by city employees. 

"We are leery about 
letting it go," said 
Councillor-at-Large 
Michael Cheney. He asked 
what would happen if the 
college ran up deficits in 
the future which the city 
would have to pay for 
without having control 
over the school. 

"That would be taxation 
without representation," 
Cheney said. "I don't want 
to put ourselves in that 
situation." 

Stice told the council 



her committee has two 
purposes, to decide what 

the relationship between 
the city and the college 
will be and to decide how 
a new governing board will 
be selected. 

Councillors had many 
questions concerning a 
govemance change which 
the committee is working 
on. 

City Solicitor Steve 
McGrath, also a 
committee member, said 
many of the answers "will 
depend upon the closeness 
of the relationship between 
Quincy College and the 
city." 

"STEVE KAVANAGH 



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rucii'L UUH»Hi "ur.iO UVlAlUlia 




VOL. 25 No. 21 




Thursday, February 11, 1993 



Now You See It . . 




THE MONTILIO'S BUILDING on Chestnut St. was a landmark in Quincy Center for 
several decades before being demolished recently. 



. . . Now You Don't 




SOUTH SHORE BANK building, right, looms over the site of the former Montilio's 
building that was leveled to make way for an enlarged bank parking lot. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman} 

Studds Hopeful Clinton 

Earmarks More Money 

For Harbor Cleanup 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

Cong. Gerry Studds said 
he is hopeful President 
Clinton will include 
additional federal money 
for the $7 billion Boston 
Harbor cleanup and a 
signal that help is on the 
way may be sounded as 
early as next week during 
the president's first State 
of Union Address Feb. 17. 

In an interview with 
The Quincy Sun Monday 
at his new Quincy office 
located at 1212 Hancock 
St., Studds also expressed 
his optimism for plans to 
establish a shipyard 
museum at the former Fore 
River shipyard as well as 
initiatives to boost 
business in the city's retail 
districts. 

In addition, the 
representative discussed 
his positions on several 
national issues, including 
the federal deficit, family 
leave law and gays in the 



military. 

Studds said his top 
priority is reducing the 
burden placed on local 
ratepayers who are 
essentially financing the 
cleanup of Boston Harbor. 
The 10-term congressman 
is said the federal and 
state governments must 
assume their fair share of 
the financial responsibility 
for the project. Studds 
also said that burden 
should be spread to non- 
MWRA district 

communities. 

Asked where and when 
that money will be 
forthcoming, Studds 
replied, "No one can 
predict that for certain. 
From my perspective, 
nothing is of any higher 

importance for me at the 
moment." 

Studds has discussed 
the issue with Gov. Weld, 
Lt. Gov. Paul Cellucci, 
Leon Panetta.new director 



of the Office of 
Management and Budget, 
and to President Chnton 
"making it very, very clear 
that both from a local and 
regional perspective in 
Quincy and in Boston 
Harbor and nationally that 
federal funding of the 
Clean Water Act for water 
and sewer treatment is an 
overridingly important 
priority. 

"We hope when the 
President submits his 
infrastructure -economic 
stimulus package, quite 
possibly as soon as his 
State of the Union Address 
(Feb. 17), that there will 
be a significant part of that 
which is directed to clean 
water funding. 

"We're also going to try 
at the federal level to once 
again get a special 
appropriation for Boston 
Harbor, we've been able to 
get $100 million in each of 

(Cont'd on Page 12) 



Union Seeks State Mediator 

Teachers Picket 
For Pay Raise, 
New Contract 

By STEVE KAVANAGH 

Quincy teachers want a pay raise and they want their contract settled now. 



Teachers picketed City 
Hall Monday and Tuesday 
to protest un.successful 
contract negotiations with 
the School Committee. 

A group of Quincy High 
School teachers carrying 
signs marched for nearly 
two hours. Teachers have 
been without a contract 
since Aug. 31, 1992. 

The teacher's union has 
asked a state mediator to 
join the negotiations. 

"Our side felt an outside 
presence (state mediator) 
might help both sides 
move closer together hiore 
quickly," said Tom Walsh 
president of the Quincy 
Education Association 
(teacher's union). 

"We hope this will get 
the School Committee to 
settle quickly," said 
teacher Paul Karhu. "We 
don't want this to drag on 
and I'm sure the School 
Committee doesn't either." 
The picketers also 
objected to a recent report 
by the Massachusetts 
Teachers Association 
which ranks Quincy 
teachers 166th in pay 
among 325 Massachusetts 
school systems. 

"We have a lot of kids 
go to college," said 
George Smith, a Quincy 
social studies teacher. 
"We feel we are among 
the best teachers in the 
state." 

The report refers to 



teachers with masters 
degrees and at least 30 
additional credits and 12 
or more years experience. 
Walsh said the majority of 
Quincy teachers are in this 
category. 

"This (report) is very 
distressing," said School 
Committee member Linda 
Stice. "In no way does it 
reflect on the quality of 
our teachers." 

Stice said the city is 
limited by budget 
constraints in what it can 
pay teachers. 

"When I first came here 
in 1967, we were in the 
top 10 percent (in the 
state) in pay," said 
Cornelius "Connie" 
Sheehan, a special needs 
counselor at Quincy High 
School. "I think people in 
the community don't 
realize the extra work we 
do outside of school on our 
own time." 

Walsh said negotiations 
began last summer before 
the contract expired. He 
said the QEA negotiation 
team meets twice a month 
with School Committee 
negotiators Stice, Steve 
Durkin and Margaret King. 
"Both sides have 
worked hard on this," Stice 
said. 

Walsh said the reason 
for the delay in reaching 
an agreement "is 
essentially money. 
Progress has been made on 



contract language." 

The most recent 
contract included no raise 
in the first year, a two- 
percent hike for the first 
six months of the second 
year, and an additional 
two percent for the second 
six months of the second 
year. 

"On our last contract we 
received zero (for the first 
year) and they are offering 
us zero again (for the first 
year)," Karhu said. 

The teachers have 
reportedly been offered a 
three-year deal with a zero 
inciease in the first year 
wiih increases in the 
second and third years. 

Stice refused to 
comment on the 
negotiations. 

Walsh said the QEA 
and School Committee 
have agreed not to discuss 
terms of negotiations in 
the media. 

"I question whether 
Quincy will attract new, 
young teachers if the pay 
scale is not comparable 
(to other communities)," 
Sheehan said. The MTA 
report ranked Quincy 296th 
of 325 in starting teacher 
salaries. 

Teachers will continue 
to picket at City Hall each 
day until the contract is 
settled, Walsh said. 
Teachers at different 
schools will take turns 
picketing each week. 



Town Brook Flood 
Protection Project Starts 



Construction of the 
Town Brook Local 
Protection Project in 
Quincy and Braintree is 
underway. 

The U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers announced that 
channel improvements 
along Town River near 
Southern Artery and Pond 
St. have started. 

The work is part of a 
$3.3 million contract for 
the first of three phases for 
the $40 million project. 

"The contractor is now 
removing material from 
the downstream reaches of 
Town River as part of the 
channel improvement 
portion of the work which 
will widen and deepen 



portions of the waterway, 
realign the channel itself 
in some areas, and also 
involves instaUing slope 
and bottom channel 
protection," said Col. 
Brink Miller, head of the 
Corps in New England. 



Related Story 
On Page 4 



P. Caliacco Corp. of 
Rockland is the contractor 
for the project. 

Construction is also 
underway on the 48-ft.- 
wide, seven- ft. -high, 282- 
ft.-long concrete box 
culvert which will channel 



the Town River under 
Southern Artery. 

"Excavated material is 
being hauled by trucks to 
the city landfill for 
disposal," Miller said. 
"The route being used by 
the trucks was 
recommended by the city 
and minimizes impacts to 
residential areas. 
Currently, there are only a 
few trips per day, but the 
number is expected to 
increase over time as the 
work progresses and could 
be as high as 12-15 during 
peak activities." 

A total of about 60,000 
cubic yards of material 

(Cont'donPagt4) 



Pag« 2 Qulocy Sun Thursday, February 11, 1993 



Chamber To Honor 
Brian Donnelly March 12 



Former Congressman 
Brian Donnelly will be 
honored by the South 
Shore Chamber of 
Commerce, Friday, March 
12, at Lombardo's, 
Randolph. 

Donnelly will be 
recognized for his 14 years 
of service as a member of 
Congress and for his 
positive contributions to 
the South Shore. 

"The economic vitality 
of the region is a direct 
result of Brian Donnelly's 
commitment and hard 
work," said Arthur 
Connelly, chaiiman of the 
Chamber's board of 
directors and president of 
the South Weymouth 




BRIAN DONNELLY 

Savings Bank. 

"Congressman Donnelly 
has always gone out of his 
way to accommodate the 
concerns of the business 
community," said 
Connelly. "We are 



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delighted to honor him 
because he represents the 
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Donnelly will be 
presented the Forrest I. 
Neal Award at the 
Chamber's annual dinner 
with more than 500 
members and guests 
expected to be attending. 

Neal was a long time 
Quincy business leader, 
past Chamber president, 
and member and former 
chairman of the MBTA 
board of directors. 

The dinner will also 
honor Thomas Galvin, vice 
president of Boston Gear 
and the 1991 board 
chairman of the South 
Shore Chamber of 
Commerce. 



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College Board Of 
Trustees Role Outlined 



The Quincy College 
Governance Committee 
heard an expert on college 
administration discuss the 
roles and responsibilities 
of a college board of 
trustees last week. 

Judith McLaughlin, a 
teacher at Harvard 
University's Graduate 
School of Education, also 
gave the committee some 
examples of bow a board 
is selected, how it is 
comprised, the relationship 
between a board and a 
college president, and the 
duties of a board chaiiman. 

McLaughlin teaches a 
course on college 
governance at Harvard and 



She said a new board of 
trustees should take a 
much broader role in 
college affairs compared 
to the Umited role of the 
current board. 

Typical responsibilities 
of a board are: 

•Hiring and firing of a 
college president. 

•Supporting and 
evaluating the college 
president. 

•Financial manage- 
ment. Fundraising, 
monitoring expenses and 
ensuring the long-term 
financial stability of the 
school. 

•Act as intermediaries 
between the school and 



is the author of a book, ^^^ community. Interpret 
Choosing A College (he needs and 



President." 

She told the committee 
and others in attendance, 
including current Quincy 
College trustees and 
faculty members, that 
Quincy College has 
outgrown its present 
governance system. 

"What may have made 
sense years ago does not 
make sense now. You have 
to find a way to make 
governance fit the school's 
needs," McLaughlin said. 



issues as 
both groups relate to each 
odaer. 

•Make sure the 
programs and long-term 
goals reflect the mission of 
the institution. 

•Accountability. 

•Act as a "court of last 
resort" within the college 
to settle appeals. 

McLaughlin told the 
committee that a board of 
trustees can be any size 
but recommended that 
Quincy College's board be 




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about 11 members. She 
said private colleges have 
bigger boards than public 
schools primarily for 
fundraising purposes. 

She said there are a 
variety of ways trustees 
can be selected and a 
board may be selected 
through a combination of 
methods including 
appointment, election, 
designated seats, etc. 

McLaughlin said the 
board should be diverse 
and have a balance of 
"skills, expertise and 
experience" but most 
importantly should have 
"the good of the school in 
common." 

She also said a board 
chairman plays a "crucial 
role" in the effectiveness 
of the trustees. 

McLaughlin reco- 
mmended that in Quincy's 
case "you ought to spend 
time after the first year to 
evaluate successes and 
failures." 

-STEVE KAVANAGH 

Cafe 
Expansion 

Continued 

By MICHAEL WHALEN 

The Quincy License 
Board Tuesday continued 
for one week a request 
from The Garden Cafe, 
653 Southern Artery, for 
permission to expand its 
premises from 4,000 to 
5,800 square feet. 

The matter had been 
continued from the board's 
Feb. 2 meeting because of 
the board's rule that all 
requests connected with 
Common Victualer and/or 
All-Alcoholic licenses be 
reviewed twice. 

City Clerk Joseph Shea 
said Tuesday the matter 
was being continued a 
second time because of 
the absence of Police 
Chief Francis Mullen, who 
is on vacation. 

"Chief Mullen wanted 
to be here (for the second 
hearing)," said Shea. 

Building Inspector 
Matthias Mulvey was also 
absent from Tuesday's 
meeting because of the 
recent death of his father. 



License 
Board 
Briefs 



The Quincy License 
Board took the following 
action at its meeting 
Tuesday: 

•Granted a request from 
G.J. Coddington's, 1250 
Hancock St. (George 
Cook) for a one-day 
extension of premises of 
their liquor license for the 
"Quincy Partnership" 
benefit dance Thursday, 
Feb. 1 1 bom 6 to 9 p.m. 

•Continued for two 
weeks a request from Kids 
Stop, 12 Revere Rd. 
(Michelle Moran) for a 
Second-hand license. 






Thursday, February 11, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Studds Opens Office 
At 1212 Hancock St. 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

Pledging to work with 
every segment of the city, 
Cong. Gerry Studds 
officially opened his new 
main office Monday at 
1212 Hancock St., Quincy 
Center, as a host of local 
officials, business and 
community leaders 
wanned his welcome. 

"It is no accident that 
this office is where it is," 
Studds said inside the 
2,300-square-foot third 
floor office. "This city has 
a heart and we are proud 
to be in it. We look 
forward to working with 
you, the business 
community, and every 
segment of this city." 

The Quincy office will 
serve as the congressman's 
main office in the 10th 
district. Smaller satellite 
offices opened Tuesday in 
Brockton and Plymouth. 

The Quincy office will 
have the most help with 
eight staffers, five full- 
time and three part-time. 
It is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. 

Constituents can call 
the office at 770-3700. To 
fax correspondence, the 
number is 770-2984. 

A public reception is 
being planned for the near 
future. 

As the city's 
representative in Congress, 
Studds said he is eager to 
work with Mayor James 
Sheets, city councillors 
and its State House 
delegation on issues 
pertaining to Quincy, the 
only city in the 10th 
congressional district. 

"I'm delighted to 
represent this city. It is 
the only city in our (10th) 
district and this office will 
be the main headquarters 



for the South Shore." 

In formally welcoming 
Studds and his staff to 
Quincy, Sheets said, "It is 
particularly impressive not 
simply to have a 
congressman have an 
office here but a 
congressman to have a 
major staff here working 
on the problems that are so 
critical, not simply to the 
Cape but to Quincy and 
the commonwealth and we 
feel that's indicative of the 
investment that you're 
making here in this city. 

"We look forward to 
working with you and we 
know that Quincy is going 
to be a better city in the 
years ahead and it's going 
to be a better city 
certainly as we move 
ahead into the 21st century 
because you have been the 
congressman, you have 
been here, and you have 
been very active in all our 
plans that we have for this 
city." 

As a real "sign" of 
appreciation, 12 local 
business people and 
officials purchased a sign 
which has been fastened to 
a wall outside the 
congressman's office. 
Reading "Congressman 
Gerry Studds" in Times 
Bold font, the antique- 



brush brass formica on 
foam sign was custom cut 
by Signature Signs in 
Quincy. 

Those contributing to 
the sign were Mike 
McFarland, Barry's Deli; 
Mark Bertman, Rogers 
Jewelers; Atty. Paul 
Epstein, Spillane & 
Epstein, Attorneys at Law; 
Ned Platner, Burgin «fe 
Platner Insurance; Atty. 
Tom Lynch, Kerstein & 
Lynch; Rich Pierce, O.P. 
Properties; George Cook, 
Coddington's Restaurant; 
Bill Spinks and Ken 
Tarabelli, Bay State 
Community Services; 
Chris Wilson, Signature 
Signs; Marcia Olinto, 
Lykes Lines; Peter 
O'Connell; and the mayor. 

William MacMuUen, 
executive director of the 
planned U.S. Naval 
Shipbuilding Museum at 
the former Fore River 
shipyard in Quincy Point, 
presented Studds and his 
staff museum coffee mugs 
as a token of his support 
for maritime issues, 
including the museum 
project. 

Studds said he was 
thankful for the warm 
reception. 

"I want to thank you for 





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CONG. GERRY STUDDS, left, is welcomed to his new office on tlie tliird floor at 1212 
Hancock St., Quincy Center, by Bill O'Connell and Mayor James Sheets. O'Connell 
represented the O'Connell Companies which is located next to Studds' offlce. The 
custom cut sign was purchased by 12 local business people and officials. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



the warmth of your 
welcome, the business 
community and all of the 
segments of the City of 
Quincy have been 
extraordinarily warm in 
their welcome. It's very 
much appreciated." 

Looking around the 



office, Studds said the 
Quincy office seemed 
larger than his office in 
Washington. "It's 

definitely nicer. This is 
wonderful space." 

Studds is soliciting on 
loan artwork and 



photographs from local 
businesses and residents to 
help decorate the office. 
Photographs of the Fore 

River shipyard and artwork 
from the Quincy Art 
Association have already 
been offered, he said. 



Morrissey Office Hours At City Hall Friday 



State Senator Michael 
Morrissey will hold office 
hours Friday, Feb. 12 fi-om 



11 a.m. to noon in the 
second floor Conference 
Room at Quincy City Hall, 



1305 Hancock St. 
All are welcome. 



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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 11, 1993 



LOST 



^"lia- 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Qu(ncy Sun Publishing Co Inc 

1372 Hancock St , Quincy Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworth Jr Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth Editor 



30( per copy. $12.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$14.00 per year by mail outside Quincy. $17 00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 47i-3i02 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St Quincy Mass 02169 



The Qumcy Sun assumes nc financial responsit-.iily (or 
lypographica' errors m advenisements but will reprint ihal 
part ot an acl.eriisemeni m which the typographical error 
occurs 



'A<k,- 



True Examples 
Of Quincy's 'Finest' 



[A copy of the 
following letter was 
submitted to The Sun for 
publication by the staff of 
the Lincoln-Hancock 
School]: 

Dear Mayor Sheets, 

We are writing this 
letter of thanks and 
appreciation for the 
outstaiKling work of three 
of Quincy's "finest," 
Officers Robert Hanna, 
Robert Edgar and Robert 
Clark. 

These officers 

demonstrated such care 
and compassion during the 
recent death of one of our 
fourth grade students, Paul 
Gauthier. The support 
these officers provided to 
Paul's family and to the 
Lincoln-Hancock School 
staff was truly incredible. 

Officer Clark and 
Officer Edgar had been 
friends with Paul for the 
past 2 1/2 years. Paul had 
great respect and 
admiration for these 
officers and he always 
enjoyed their visits. Paul 
was also active in the PAL 
program and was recently 
presented an awarded for 



his participation. He loved 
his award because it had a 
Dolice car on it, but more 
importantly because it 
came from his friend, 
Officer Bob Claric. 

To show their respect 
and admiration for this tine 
young man, these officers 
on their own time stood 
Honor Guard at Paul's 
casket. Officers Edgar, 
Clark and Hanna along 
with brother officers served 
as pall bearers at Paul's 
funeral. Officer Clark also 
delivered a very poignant 

and loving eulogy at 

Paul's fiineral Mass. 

Paul will be deeply 
missed by all of his 
teachers, the students and 
his friends at Lincoln- 
Hancock Community 
School. We will never 
forget the generosity, 
consideration and 
compassion shown by 
these three officers. They 
truly are examples of 
Quincy's "Finest." 

The Staff Of The 
Lincoln-Hancock 
Community School 



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Open School Seat(s)? 




SANTORO 




There could be one or two open School Commit- 
tee seats in this fall's city election. 
Frank Santoro who will be closing out eight years 
(two terms) on the board has been 
telling friends he will not seek re- 
election. 

Ron Mariano who will be com- 
pleting his first four-year term hasn't 
decided whether or not to seek re- 
election. 

Mariano was elected state representative in a special 
election in November, 1991 succeed- 
ing Robert Cerasoli who was appointed 
the state's Inspector General. He was 
re-elected last year. 

Mariano decided to complete 
his School Committee term because 
MARIANO of matters that were still to come be- 
fore the board including the selection of a new school 
superintendent after Robert Ricci resigned. The job 
went to Eugene Creedon. 

Mariano says there are still other educational mat- 
ters he would like to have a voice in but may be able to 
pursue them on Beacon Hill. 

"I'll make a decision soon," he says about whether 
to seek a second term on the School Conmiittee. 

Margaret (Peggy) King who was 
appointed in April, 1 992, to fill out the 
term of Mary Collins who resigned 
because of health reasons, will be up 
for election this year. 

No indication yet on what her plans 

are. 

Q KING 

WILL HE OR won't he? That's still the big political 
question waiting for an answer. 

The answer will come soon from City Coimcillor 
Tim Cahill who is still seriously mulling a run for 
mayor this year. 

Although some friends are advising him to seek re- 
election to the council this year and nm for mayor in 
1995, Cahill definitely has not ruled out challenging 
Mayor James Sheets this fall. 

In fact, he seems to be leaning that way. 

He has an office on the second floor in the Burgin 




Plamer building at 1359 Hancock St., across from his 
former Handshakes Restaurant. He used the office for 
bookkeeping and other business matters pertaining to 
the restaurant. 

He recently sold the restaurant and is now referring 
to tlie office as "my campaign office." 

Someone noted that he would need a street floor 
location with more visibility if he were to nm for 
mayor. 

Cahill agreed that he would open a larger headquar- 
ters for mayor. 

Someone else noted the second floor office would 
still serve as an ideal spot for telephone soliciting in a 
mayor's race. 

(And, of coiu"se, for a city coimcil re-election cam- 
paign.) 

So, which political office does Cahill plan to use his 
political office for? 
The answer is coming soon. 

□ 
DAN FLYNN, real estate auctioneer, has been named 
to the Quincy Planning Board by Mayor Sheets to fill 
the vacancy created by the retirement of long-time 
member Joseph McConville. 

Flynn was a candidate for Governor's Coimcil in 
last fall's election. 

U 
GOOD NEWS FOR Herb Fontaine, former WJDA 
news editor. Fontaine, who imderwent 
siu-gery at Massachusetts General 
Hospital in December has been imder- 
going weekly radiation treatments 
there since. He was scheduled for 35 
treatments but after taking 3 1 , doctors 
told him he doesn't need the other 
fom-. 

He's feeling fine and is staying active on various 
community conraiittees and boards. 

G 
THAT WAS A nice piece on the Quincy police and 
Quincy District Court's domestic violence program on 
TV's "60 Minutes" Sunday. It certainly made Quincy 
look good and deservingly so. But couldn't someone 
have taken Ed Bradley aside and said, "Look, Ed, we 
pronoimce it Quin-zee not Quin-cee." 




FONTAINE 



Confd From Page ] 

will be removed and taken 
to the landfill. 

The number of traffic 
lanes will be reduced from 
four to three on a small 
stretch of Southern Artery 
near Pond St. Traffic lanes 
will alternate to account 
for rush hour traffic. 



Town Brook Flood 
Protection Project Starts 



The remaining phases 
of work to complete the 
Town Brook project 
involve construction of a 
12-ft.-diameter, 4,060 ft. 
tunnel beneath downtown 
Quincy and reconstruction 
of the Old Quincy 
Reservoir Dam in 
Braintree. 



Work is scheduled to 
begin in the fall and is 
expected to take 2 1/2 
years to complete. Work 
on the dam would take an 
additional 18 months. 

"When complete in 
1997, the project will 
provide a significant 
measure of protection to 



the communities of Quincy 
and Braintree by diverting 
flood flows through the 
tunnel, culvert, and the 
realigned channel," Col. 
Miller said. 

The project is being 
constructed with 75 
percent federal fiinds and 
25 percent MDC funds. 



Pond St. Playground Closed For Flood Project 



Raymond C. Cattaneo, 
executive director of the 
Park, Forestry and 
Cemetery Departments 
announces that the upper 
section of Munroe 
Playground on Pond St. 
will be closed until further 
notice. 

The Town Brook 
Flooding Project has 
started the first phase of 
construction in that area 
and will be using the field 
and playground for a 



staging area, he said. 

Park Department 
personnel will be removing 
the playground equipment 
from the site and will store 
it at the Park and 
Recreation Department 
Complex until the 
playground can be restored 
upon completion of the 
project in that area. 

The tennis and 
basketball courts at the 
lower end of the park are 
still operable and will 



remain open for the time 
being but residents 
utilizing the courts should 
remain cautious due to the 



heavy equipment and 
vehicles involved at the 
construction site, Cattaneo 
said. 



$77,315 In Wire Permits 



The Quincy Department 
of Wire Inspection issued 
101 permits for an 
estimated cost of wiring of 
$77,315 during January, 
according to Wire 
Inspector Thomas Purpura. 

During the month there 
were 31 certificates of 



approval issued to 
Massachusetts Electric 
Company and $2,795.75 in 
permit fees. 

In addition, there were 
215 inspections, 19 
reinspections, 39 defects 
noted, and one fire call. 



Thursday, February 11, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 5 



Readers Forum 



Quincy Losing Economic Backbone: Small Business vocUinCy S 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

We have now 
concluded our survey on 
lost Quincy businesses 
from August 1991- 
December 1992. During 
this period, two major 
mailings were made from 
our association that 
reached 1,900 individual 
businesses in Quincy. 
These businesses were 
listed in the 1991 and 1992 
NYNEX Yellow Pages. 

Our membership of 97 
businesses (as of 
12/31/92), gives us the 
base for the information 
requested. Only one 
business did not provide 
employment numbers. 
Another business could not 
give the breakdown or 
resident/non- resident 
employees. We removed 
three businesses from the 
survey, because they were 
way above average in 
numbers of employees of 



the rest of our membership. 
By removing these three 
businesses, the results 
become more realistic, 
and we feel, give a more 
accurate picture of the 
demise of small business 
in Quincy, and the 
resulting economic loss in 
jobs and expendable 
income. 

Once the purges are 
made to our current 
business listing, we will 
once again go to the more 
current Yellow Pages, 
update our listing and 
begin another mailing, 
during 1993, to continue 
the survey we have begun. 
To the best of our 
knowledge, this type of 
survey, giving the results 
that we have gathered, has 
never been done in our 
city. We felt that it should 
be done, so that everyone 
in Quincy can understand 
how the economy of the 
entire community is 



affected by small business. 

We have made two 

mailings thus far. August 

1991-November 1991 and 

August 1992-November 

1992. What we found is, 

that the businesses losses 

increased during 1992. In 

1991 we showed an 

average loss of 10 

businesses per month, 

while 1992's losses 

increased it to 14.75 per 

month. We expect that by 

the end of 1993, Quincy, 

will have lost at least 300 

small businesses in a 28 

month period, and that 

estimates to 10.7 or 11 

businesses per month. 

Any city that loses 12 
percent or higher of its 
small business base, the 
loss in jobs, wages, and 
tax revenues will be 
substantial. We strongly 
believe that under the 
present taxes and fees 
levied upon the business 



community, by this city, it 
will conrinue to destroy 
more small businesses and 
Quincy will remain 
unattractive to small 
business, until the cost of 
running a business here is 
reduced. Yes, some 
businesses are being 
attracted to Quincy, but 
the examples given by our 
elected officials are large 
corporations such as Stop 
& Shop, Shaw's, etc. The 
backbone of the economy 
of the United States of 
America is small business, 
not big business. Damage 
your small business base 
enough, and you will 
destroy your local 
economy as a result. We 
believe this is what has 
happened to the City of 
Presidents, Quincy, 
Massachusetts. 

Loren W. Strout 
Acting President 
Quincy Business Voice 



Wollaston Working, Why Not Quincy Center? 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
As we enter a new year 
of life in the history of the 
City of Quincy, there is 
much hope and prosperity 
envisioned for the Quincy 
Center business district. 
Recently, plans were 
announced for a new state 
of the art retail megaplex. 
Supporters of this proposal 
see it as a way to 
revitalize Downtown 
Quincy but as they say in 
Missouri, "seeing is 
believing." 

In my younger days, I 
remember riding those 
green Eastern Mass. from 
Helds Comer, Dorchester, 
to Quincy Square to visit 
relatives. At that time, 
Quincy was still 
Shopperstown USA. That 
was then but this is now. 
Quincy Center remains bat 
a shadow of its past. 
Presidents Place is nice 
but Hancock St. can only 
dream of what was 
because today its appears 
to be little more than a 



ghost town of lost hopes. 

I hear talk of Quincy 
2000. Of public-private 
partnerships. Of politicians 
wearing rose-colored 
glasses. But it is time to 
take the blinders off and 
exit the Twilight Zone. 
The Downtown Quincy of 
yesteryear is gone. 
Shopping malls like South 
Shore Plaza and Hanover 
Mall killed it No super- 
doper retail center will 
challenge that mall life. 

PertuqM it is time for 
Qaiocy to downscale some 
seemingly misplaced 
idealism and see the 
reality of 1993. Perhaps 
time would be more wisely 
q>ent seeing what works 
elsewhere in Quincy and 
twinging it down to Quincy 
Center. As a Quincy 
resident since 1984, 1 think 
it is time for Quincy city 
officials to take a good 
long look at, for example, 
Wollaston Center. Here is 
a working model that 
should be the envy of the 



entire South Shore region. 
If Wollaston were a 
municipaUty, this district's 
center of commerce be its 
Main Street. Things work 
in Wollaston Center. 
Business prospers. Empty 
storefronts happen rarely. 
The area has everything. It 
is a small business heaven. 
Why couldn't Downtown 
Quincy look here for 
inspiration? 

Travel through 
Downtown Quincy after 5 
p.m. and its sidewalks are 
rolled up. Cars ride by 
darkened stores on empty 
streets. Shoppers are either 
home or at the malls. And 
some of them may have 
even travelled on down to 
Wollaston Center. After 
dark, it doesn't become a 
ghost town. People are out 
walking. And shopping. 
Giving life to a prospering 
business area. The object 
of City Hall shouldn't be 
in making Downtown 
Crossing in Boston but 
rather in making it 



comparable to the likes of 
the business district down 
Hancock St. in Wollaston. 
Quincy is Quincy. It is 
not the Boston of the 
South Shore. But it is a 
good family community. A 
mid-sized city with a 
future separate that of 
Boston. Yes, it is 
important to be able to 
attract shoppers from 
nearby South Shore 
communities but the major 
commitment of Quincy 
ought to be in serving the 
needs of its own people 
first. 

Wollaston Center 
serves its geographic area 
quite efficiently and 
effectively. There is no 
reason Quincy Center can 
not do likewise. 
Sometimes you have to let 
go of the past in order to 
reach the future. Now is 
that time for Quincy 
Center. 

Sal J. Giarratani 
184 AUantic St. 
North Quincy 



Warning To Cat Owners: 
Beware Of Rabies 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

To those who beUeve in 
letting their cats out at 
will, a warning! 

Rabies in 

Massachusetts in now 
considered an epidemic. If 
you cat, in a cat fight, 
suffers a wound or an 
abscess and you don't 
have proof of its rabies 
vaccination, more than 
likely the veterinarian will 
have no choice but to 
euthanize your cat 
because there would be no 
proof of its wound having 



been caused by a rabid 
animal. 

Cat breeding season is 
almost upon us and cat 
fights will be prevalent. 
Your pet is placed in 
extreme danger if in 
contact with feral 
(untamed) cats which 
have obviously not been 
vaccinated. 

Please be forewarned. 
You pet's very life 
depends on you! 

Aldiea Griffin 

President 

S S. Humane Society 



Congratulations To Cheney, 
First Night Committee 



Volunteer Openings 
At Quincy Hospital 



Quincy Hospital is 
seeking volunteers for its 
Patient Information desk 
and Gift Shop. 

Hospital volunteers 
provide valuable services 



to patients and visitors in 
many different ways. 
Training is provided. For 
information call the 
volunteer coordinator, 773- 
6100, ext. 3149. 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
On behalf of Impact 
Quincy: Quincy Coalition 
for the Prevention of 
Alcohol and Other Drug 
Problems, we would like 
to congratulate Michael 
Cheney and the entire 
First Night Committee for 
iiijeir efforts. Councillor 
(Cheney and his committee 
have demonstrated that 
when every sector of our 
community joins together, 
we can accomphsh great 
works. 

Impact Quincy is proud 
to have served as a 
sponsor for the celebration, 
and would like to thank 
everyone who took part in 
the events~the performers 
who shared their talents, 
the public safety personnel 
who insured our well- 
being, the volunteers and 



other sponsors who made it 
all possible, and the 
thousands who attended 
the events without 
incident, and without the 
use of alcohol or other 
drugs. They communicated 
a powerful message to 
young and old alike that 
the essential ingredient for 
fiin and enjoyment is the 
sharing of our talent and 
energy with others, not the 
use of alcohol or other 
drugs. 

Congratulations again 
to the First Night 
Committee. We look 
forward to supporting their 
continuing efforts to make 
Quincy a healthier 
community. 

Janet Powell, 
Co- Chairperson 
Impact Quincy 



Yesterdays 



Feb, U-17 

1947 

46 Years Ago 



Broad Meadows 
Irks Adams Shore 

Residents of Adams Shore were complaining of the large 
amount of dust that was blowing on, and sometimes into 
their homes after sludge dredged from the Town River was 
dumped on the meadows. 

"It s so bad here that Adams Shore women are getting the 
name of being poor house- ■ 

keepers, even though they 
keep the vacuum cleaners 
going almost day and night." 
said Mrs. Helen M. 
Cruikshank of 14 Eaton Rd. 

"It soils our laundry on the ---------------------- 

line. It blows through cracks in the house. It ruins the linen. 
It coats our homes a dirty gray . For two nights we had to sleep 
with the windows sealed tight." 

FIRE INSPECTION 

Acting Fire Chief Robert Fenby announced that the Fire 
Department will make a citywide inspection of stores, fac- 
tories and other business estabhshments in a campaign 
against fire hazards. 

The drive was launched after acting Mayor Christian 
Budcard made a surprise personal inspection of conditions in 
Quincy Center, Quincy Point, Norfolk Downs and Wollaston 
and found many violations. 

Budcard said he was tipped to the conditions by George 
J. Anderson, proprietor of a Quincy Center restaurant, who 
accompanied him on his inspection trip. 

aO OUSTER PLANNED 

The Independent Union of Fore River Woikers opened a 
drive to oust Local 5 of the CIO union as bargaining agent at 
the Fore River Shipyard, promising it will provide more jobs 
at the yard. 

Meanwhile, acting Mayor Buikard sent telegrams to 
Sens. Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. and Leverett Saltonstall de- 
manding to know who was blocking a $60 million contract 
for three cargo-passenger ships for the American Export 

Line. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

Joseph Nello of 115 Montclair Ave., Montclair, was 
rescued by police boat from Half Moon Island after he 
became stranded by a rising tide that reached his knees while 
digging clams ... A new ordinance went into effect harming 
parking from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (m the west side of Hancock 

St. between School and Granite Sts Hamburger was 33 

cents a pound and Campbell 's tomato soup 1 1 cans for $ 1 at 

the Mohican Market, 25 Chestnut St John R. Herbert, 

editor of die Patriot Ledger, spoke on "An Editor Looks At 
Parents," at the Christ Church Mothers Qub Fathere Night 
Supper . . . Helen O. Potter, director of nursing at City 
Hospital, was honored for 10 years of service at a party in the 
GordonHouse . . .The Cooperative for AmericanRemittances 
to Europe (CARE)estabUshed a Quincy agency at the United 
Cooperative Store, 380 Granite St. . . . Mrs. Charies Grocott 
was elected president of the Pocahontas Qub of Squantum . 
. . the 49th anniversary of the sinking of the batdeship Maine 
was observed by the John A. Boyd Camp, United Spanish 
War Veterans, at its headquarters, 24 High School Ave. . . .A 
baby was bom at die dispensary of the Squantum Naval Air 
Station for die first time when a taxi carrying Mrs. Paul E. 
Reed of 1 1 Bellevue Rd., Squantum, couldn't make it to City 
Hospital in time . . . Timothy A. King of 156 Albatross Rd; 
Frederick P. Cullen Jr. of 1 85 West Squantum St,; and Milton 
J. Millerof 120 WillardSt enlisted in theNavy .. .The State 
Legislative Conunittee on Municipal Finance s^roved sal- 
ary increases to $6,000 for Mayor Charies A. Ross and 
$1,000 for each city councillor . . . The Wollaston Lutheran 
Church purchased The School of die Spdcen Word, qierated 
by die late Myma Chamberlain at Hancock St. and Ellington 

Rd "Wedding Night", starring Gary Cooper and Anna 

Sten, and "In Fast Company", with Leo Gorcey and Huntz 
Hall, were playing at die Regent Theater, Nwfolk Downs . . 
. City Councillor Cari W. Anderson charged that the Engi- 
neering Department was using city vehicles after hours when 
he spotted one in Randolph on a Sunday . . . Paul A. Colletti 
of 60 Hughes St., South Quincy, was confirmed as a member 
of the State Board of Registrars of Architects . . . Curtis 
Miller and Robert Lamb of die Class of 1938 presented a 
bronze memcmal plaque to North Quincy High School in 
honor of classmates who died during the war. . . The newly 
formed Moittclair Men's Club, an all veteran social organi- 
zation, held its second meeting in the Mootdair Community 
Hall. 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, February U, 1993 




Marie *s 
Kitchen 



By MARIE J. D'OLIMPIO 



^^iTi: 



Stacey's Chicken Creation 



Just when you think you have cooked 
chicken every way in the world, there 
always seems to be yet another. Here is 
a wonderful way to seiA'e it created by 
our granddaughter, Stacey, who is 
getting to be a real gourmet cook. It 
starts out with broihng the chicken breast 
and then adding eggplant and cheese. 
The following recipe feeds four people. 
Stacey's Chicken Creation 
4 Boneless skinless chicken breasts 
(about 1/2 to 1 inch thick) 
4 slices of eggplant 
4 ounces of mozzarella cheese 
4 ounces of blue cheese 
a cup or so of tomato sauce 



olive oil for frying the eggplant slices 
salt and pepper to taste 

Start out by broihng the chicken 
breasts. Don't overcook. Remove from 
oven and set aside. In hot oil, saute the 
eggplant slices (about 1/4 inch thick). 

In a slightly greased baking dish, place 
the pieces of broiled chicken. On top of 
that place some shredded cheese and 
some of the blue cheese. Top with 
eggplant slices, some tomato sauce and 
then more shredded cheese. Bake in a 
350 degree oven for about five minutes. 
Take out of the oven and then place blue 
cheese on top and serve. It is such a 
different flavor with the combination of 
the cheeses as well as eye appealing. 




PATRICIA NUGENT, center, was Quincy High School's representative for Student 
Government Day held recently at the State House. Johiing her are , from left, Rep. 
Steve Tobin, teacher Jack Scanlan, Rep. Michael Bellotti and Rep. Ron Mariano. 

{Jack Leonard photo) 



College Planning Program At Quincy High 



Applications Available For 
Bernazzani School Scholarships 



A "College Planning Program" will be held in 



Quincy 
School of Ballet 

(established 1 969) 

Leslie Vinson 
located at 
34 Franklin St. 

(Quincy Beauty Academy) ^ 

Quincy 

REGISTRATION: f I 

Tuesday, Feb. 16 J J 

3:30-5:30 pm 

or Call 472-5951 

Boys & Girls Ages 2 thru Adult 




Classes in 

Ballet Production 

(Classical Ballet & Pointe) 

Musical Production 

(Jazz, Tap, Acting, & Singing) 



the Quincy High School 
Method Center 

Wednesday, March 3. 

There will be two 
workshops: one for grade 
1 1 students during second 
and third periods; and the 
second for parents between 
7 and 9 p.m. 



@ United Way 

^^^^ II hrinifs (xjl Ihe hesi in jII of us. 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 



The Charles A. 
Bernazzani School Parent- 
Teacher Organization is 
sponsoring two lottery 
scholarships of $250 each 

to two students from the 
1993 high school 
graduating class who 
attended the Charles A. 
Bernazzani School, 



formerly the Furnace 
Brook School. 

Applications are 
available at the Charles A. 
Bernazzani School office 
and must be completed 
and returned by March 18, 
1993. 

To qualify for the 
scholarships, students 
graduating in the current 



school year must have 
been accepted to an 
accredited institution of 
higher learning. 

The winners will be 
chosen by lottery at the 
March 22, 1993 scheduled 
meeting of the Charles A. 
Bernazzani Parent- 
Teacher Organization 
meeting. 



*Have A Heart* Campaign 
To Help Feed Needy Families 



SERVICE 



M08IIE 



AUIO-HOME BUSiMESS 

• DEADIOLTS IMS'. AILED 

• LOCKS REKETED 

• DOOR CLOSERS 

I • PANIC HARDWARE 
!• AUTO KEYS FITTED 



VISIT OUR SHOWROOM 
756 SO. ARTFRY. QUINCY 

472-21 77 



The Quincy Community 
Action Emergency Food 
Center's "Have A Heart" 
campaign is underway to 
help feed needy families. 

Valenune "hearts" may 
be purchased for $1 at the 
South West Community 

Center, 388 Granite St.; 
The Hat Rack; Houghs 



Neck American Legion 
Post; The Haufbrau, Sea 
St.; Locami's Liquor Store, 
Quincy; Caps, Braintree; 
Helen's, Weymouth 
Landing; Friday's, 
Norwell; and The Ground 
Round, Norwell. 

Each $1 donation will 
enable QCA to purchase 



eight pounds of food worth 
$14 from the Boston Food 
Bank. 

Last year QCA helped 
feed over 5,000 families 
by distributing more than 
200,000 lbs. of food and 
related items including 
formula, diapers, chicken, 
meats and cereal. 



Alliance For Mentally 111 Meeting Feb. 22 



The Coastal & South 
Shore Alliance For The 
Mentally 111 will meet 
Monday, Feb. 22 at 7 p.m. 
in the Quincy Mental 
Health Center, 460 Quincy 





Ave., Quincy. 

A video-discussion 
session entitled "Staying 
Involved Without 
Becoming Overwhelmed" 
will be held. Presenters 
will include Edward 



Monier, LICSW, social 
services at Medfield 
Hospital and Jack 
Churchill.a member of the 
Cambridge-Somerville 
Alliance For The Mentally 

m. 



RECEPTION HALLS 



ISTYUSH120-SEATEF 

D600VERBINEAR 

MAMNABAY. 

THOUGHT TD BE 

AMEUA'S. 

The saoct's out 

function room at Amelia's 
has become one of Boston's 
most popular spots tor uied- 

diTigs, shouvs, corporate 
meetir>gs, and get togethers 

of all kinds We feature an 
extensive menu at affordable 
prices We outlook Manna 
Bay and the Boston skyline 
We'd tike to make your next 
functxxi really fly. 

PkasccaD 6174711453. 



i 



AMELI 



/ictny Rd. No Quincy. 1^1 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 
WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 
Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



MUSIC 



LIVE MUSIC 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Art Perry, His Saxophone 

and Orchestra 

Featuring 

Music of the 30s and 40s 

843-7878 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 




PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography 



Mclf^^' 



ire's 

Studio 

679 Hancock Street, Quincy 

(Woilaston) 

479-6888 



Quincy 

Cliorai Society 

Chamber Chorus 

479-2061 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Woilaston 
472-4027 



JEWELRY 



HONEYMOON 

IN ROMANTIC SCOTLAND 

« Castle or Cottage « 

Scottish Connections 

304 Victory Rd., Marina Bay 

617-770-4172 2/4 



I^OLSOn F'neJeweliy 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family Al - Dave- Mark* 

730 HANCOCK ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 



Our Policy On 

Engagement Photographs 

And Wedding Announcements 



The Quincy Sm will <;t)^MIWj 
tographs witlk engagemeoit anoouncramieotfi as it 
always has. 

The Sun will also continue to use m wedding 
announcements the names of all members of the 
wedding pany including maid or matron of Ikmkw, 
best man, parents, bridesmaids, ushers, flower 
girls and ringbearers, etc. 

We invite engaged couples to submit their 
photos with their announceajenls^ard when sub- 
mitting their wedding photo toindltide a complete 
listing of tlie wedding party. 

Black and white photos are preferred, line Sun 
can convert most color photos to black and white 
for publication but the photo loses some clarity in 
the process. 

We suggest that when you have your engage- 
ment photo taken, you request the studio to send a 
copy loThe Sun with the reminder that The Sun is 
continuing its policy of publishing engagement 
photos. 

The Sun also publishes articles and photos of 
wedding aimiversaries beginning with the 25th 
anniversary. 



QPIC Valentine's Dance 
At Morrisette Post Friday 



Quincy Park 

Improvement Committee 
(QPIC) will host a 
Valentine's Day Dance 
Friday, Feb. 12 from 8 p.m. 
to 1 a.m. at the Morrisette 
Legion Post, Furnace 
Brook Parkway. 

The event is being held 
to help raise the funds 
necessary to restore 
CoUins-Rest-A-While park 
on Southern Artery, across 
from Veterans Memorial 
Field in Quincy. 

Entertainment will be 



provided by DJ Mark 
McGilicuddy and the 
Quincy band The Swing 
Set's. 

Those attending must 
be 21 or older. Tickets are 
$8 and may be purchased 
at the door or by calling 
Michelle Lydon at 471- 
5780. 

QPIC has raised over 
$40,000 for the restoration 
of CoUins-Rest-A-While. 
The target date to open the 
park is May 4. 



Pot Luck Dinner Saturday 
At Memorial Congregational 



Memorial 
Congregational Church, 
Sagamore St. and Newbur>' 
Ave., North Quincy will 
hold a Pot Luck Dinner 
Saturday at 6 p.m. 

Entertainment, which 



will include Irish step 
dancing, jazz dancing and 
a sing-a-long will begin at 
7 p.m. Admission is free. 

For more information 
call 471-9311 evenings. 



Applications For Mclntyre 
Memorial Scholarships Available 




Applications for the 
annual James R. Mclntyre 
Memorial Scholarships are 
available at the office of 
Paul A.M. Hunt, 1212 
Hancock St., Quincy, 
02169, third floor, between 
9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.. 



Monday through Friday. 

Two $2000 dollar 
undergraduate student 
scholarships and one 
graduate student 
scholarship will be 
awarded. 



JOSEPH CIARDI and DAWN ELWOOD 

(Pagar Studios) 

Dawn Elwood Engaged 
To Joseph Ciardi 



Squantum Women's 
Club Meeting Today 



Squantum Women's 
Club will meet today 
(Thursday) at 12:15 p.m. in 
First Church of Squantum, 
164 Bellevue Rd. 

The program will be 
entitled "The Romance of 



Vintage Clothing." 

A blood pressure 
screening at 11:45 a.m. 
will precede the meeting. 
All are welcome. 

For more information 
call President Ann Clark 
at 328-1126. 



Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. 
Elwood of Quincy 
announce the engagement 
of their daughter. Dawn 
Marie, to Joseph L. Ciardi. 
He is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert E. Ciardi of 
Quincy. 

Miss Elwood, a 1987 
graduate of North Quincy 
High School and a 1991 
graduate of Simmons 



College, is a freelance 
writer and assistant to the 
publisher at The Boston 
Parents' Paper. 

Mr. Ciardi, a 1985 
graduate of Quincy High 
School and a 1989 
graduate of Bryant 
College, is assistant vice 
president for Blackstone 
Capital. 

An August wedding is 
planned. 



Mr., Mrs. Stephen Storer Sr. 
Parents Of Son 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen F. Grandparents are Mrs. 

Storer Sr. of North Patricia A. O'Neil of 

Weymouth are parents of a Weymouth and Mr. and 
son, Patrick Michael, bom 

Jan. 16 at South Shore Mrs. Francis Storer of 

Hospital in Weymouth. Quincy. 

Deborah Ramos On Dean's List 



United Quincy Alliance 
Meeting Feb. 17 



The United Quincy 
Alliance of the United 
First Parish Church will 
meet in the Parish Hall 
Wednesday, Feb. 17 at 1 
pjn. 

Hostesses for coffee and 



dessert are Mary Vallier 
and Aedis Porter. 



Deborah Ramos of 
Quincy was named to the 
Dean's List for the fall 
semester at West Virginia 
University. 

"This institution takes 
great pride in the 
accomplishments of these 



students," said WVU 
President Neil Bucklew. 
More than 3,000 students 
earned Dean's List status 
for the semester. 

Ramos, of 422 Belmont 
St., is the daughter of John 
and Margaret Ramos. 



Guest speaker will be 
Edward Fitzgerald, 
director of the Quincy 
Historical Society. 

Mr., Mrs. John Mariano 
Parents Of Son 

Mr. and Mrs. John Bangs of North Quincy. 
Mariano of South 



Doris Wong On Tufts Dean's List 



William 
Palmer St. 



Y. Chu, 224 
Quincy, has 



been named to the Dean's 
List at Tufts University. 



Weymouth are parents of a 
son, Matthew, bom Jan. 20 
at South Shore Hospital in 
Weymouth. 

Grandparents are Mr. 
and Mrs. Victor Mariano of 
Quincy and Mrs. Carol 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



BALLOONS & STUFF 



690 HANCOCK ST. 

WOLLASTON 

773-0690 



ASK FOR THE $29.95 
BALLOON DELIVERY 



Russell Edvyard's 



Thursday, February 11, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 7 

Spring Fashion Show 
At St. Joseph's School 



St. Joseph's School, 
Washington St., Quincy 
Point, will host a 
Children's Spring Fashion 
Show Saturday, March 6 
at 1 p.m. in the school 
gymnasium. 

Fashions displayed will 
be Easter/Spring dresses 
and First Communion 
dresses by L'il Britches of 
Melrose. They will be 
modeled by St. Joseph's 



students. The show will 
also include a catered 
luncheon. 

Tickets are $20 for 
adults, $S for children and 
may be purchased by 
calling Mary Jo Brogna at 
472-0394, Kathy 

Gianndrea at 472-7357, 
Marguerite Califano at 
471-8999, and Barbara 
Lorenzano at 479-7828. 



Quincy ITC Club 
Hosting Tea Sunday 



The Quincy ITC Club 
will host a "Get 
Acquainted Tea" at the 
First Baptist Church, 85 
Main St., Hingham, 
Sunday, Feb. 14 from 2 to 
4 p.m. 

Dorothy Nugent, region 



president and Gail Connor, 
past president of region 
and current president of 
the Winchester ITC Club 
will be guest speakers. 

For more information 
caU 328-0214. 



Silver Citizens 
Luncheon Feb. 28 



Quincy Silver Citizens 
Qub will hold a Pot Roast 
Luncheon Sunday, Feb. 28 
at 1:15 p.m. in the 
cafeteria at Sacred Heart 
School, North Quincy. 

The event is being 
catered by Amohein's of 
South Boston. 



Entertainment will be 
provided by Martha and 
George Bregoli. Door prize 
and chances will also be 
available. 

Cost is $15. For more 
information call 328-9171 
or Irene-5326. 



10 Residents On 
Thayer Honor Roll 



Thayer Academy in 
Braintree lists 10 Quincy 
residents on the first term 
honor roll. 

They are: 

Upper School High 
Honors: Amy Yuen Man 
Lau, Brendan M. Gibbons, 



Jeremiah D. Murphy. 

Middle School 
Honors: M. Elizabeth 
Brandon, Sarah F. 
Brandon, Evan G. 
Burleigh, Scott J. Dunn, 
Hillary N. Miller, Karla Y. 
Sanchez, Rachel L. Shea. 



Mr., Mrs. Ayoub 
Parents Of Daughter 



Gayle and Dimitri 
Ayoub of Wollaston are 
parents of a daughter, 

Jesse Zoia Ayoub, bom 
Jan. 27 at Quincy Hospital. 



Grandparents are Peter 
and Elaine Zoia of 
Wollaston, Alberta 
Gentile, also of Wollaston, 
and the late Salvatore 
Gentile. 



LOVE IS ... a perfect wedding at the 
Golden Lion Suite 




Speak to RH« - (ht • our rwilal igcnl 
•ptclaltzing In complaU wadding 
packaga plana and all othar occaalont 
Tlw Goldan Lion Sulfa accomodalaa up 
10 300 Tha Vanallan Room up to 140 
guatlt. Gl«a Rlla a call lot an 
appolnlmani tor your raaarvallon Na» 
brochurat art avallabla 

(Air CondHlonad) 

CAM. 

Quincy Sons of Italy Social ( enltr 

120 Quarry Street, Quincy. MA 02169 

NEW M MBER is 472-$900 



SAME DAY SLIDES 

(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 



''/i^ 



A full service hair salon 

MONDAY 

Women's Special $20.00 

TUES & THURS 

Men's Special $13.00 



WEDNESDAY 
Perm Special 

Starting at $42.00 m-.x •■ »« , ... 

^ Nail Tipping & Overlay $60 

All specials include wash, cut and blowdry. Sculptured Nails $60 

Long hair slightly higher Pedicures $25 

Body & Facial Waxing Available 

We carry a full line of hak care products 
REDKEN KMS ^I"S PFiuL MITCHELL yniatfix 

472-1060 

, Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts., 1 Maple St., Quincy , 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 11, 1993 



Arts/Entertainment 



Valentine's Day Concert 

For Black History Month 

At United First Parish 

A St. Valentine's Day 
Concert in recognition of 
Black History Month will 
be held Sunday, Feb. 14 at 
3 p.m. in United First 
Parish Church, 1306 
Hancock St., Quincy 
Center, opposite City Hall. 

The event is a 
presentation of the 
Scarborough Chamber 
Players Multi-Cultural 
Series at the church and 
the South Shore Coalition 
for Human Rights. 

Soprano Andrea 
Bradford, pianists Darryl 
HoUister and John Andrew 
Ross and fiench homist W. 
Marshall Sealy will take 
the audience through a 
history of song styles 
including jazz, the 
classics, and spirituals. 

A native of Huntsville, 
Ala., Bradford is a 

graduate of Oberlin ANDREA BRADFORD 

College and has a master's Ellington favorites, during accompanist for Boston 



LVA-Quincy Seeking 
Literacy Volunteers 




Tutors are needed to 
teach basic reading and 
English as a second 
language to adults in 
Quincy and the South 
Shore area. 

The program is 
sponsored by the Literacy 
Volunteers of America- 
Quincy. There is a 
particular need for male 
volunteers. 

Orientations for 
volunteer tutors are 
scheduled for Wednesday, 
Feb. 24 and Thursday, 
March 4 at 7 p.m. at the 
Adams Shore branch (Sea 
St.) of the Thomas Crane 
Public Library. 

For information or to 
volunteer call 376-1314. 

As an affiliate of 
Literacy Volunteers of 
America, the library 



provides free, confidential 
tutoring to adults in either 
reading or conversational 
English. 

The Basic Reading 
program helps native 
English speakers improve 
their reading and writing 
skills so they can function 
more effectively at home, 
on the job, and in the 
community. The program 
is for adults who read at or 
below the sixth grade 
level. 

There is no single 
reason why some 
Americans have never 
learned to read. Some 
students dropped out of 
school. Others missed 
obtaining important skills 
and were too embarrassed 
to seek help. Some 
students lacked 

educational opportunities 



for an interest in learning. 
Others have learning 
disabilities which were not 
noticed or corrected in 
school. 

The English as a 
Second Language Program 
helps people from other 
countries learn to speak 
English. Quincy and the 
South Shore has seen a 
dramatic increase in the 
number of immigrants 
settling here who need 
help understanding and 
speaking English. 

The program 

emphasizes verbal 
communication reinforced 
by reading and writing. 
Tutors do not need to know 
another language to 
participate. Training will 
help to develop the skills 
needed to teach English. 



?f_f !!...'^or. I'VZ Sunday's program. 



University. She is the 1985 
winner of the Southern 
Regional Vocal 

Competition, a regular 
with Opera Un Met and 
has performed with the 
Opera Company of Boston, 



Ross was musical 
director and arranger for 
"Dancing in the Street," 
the longest running 
Boston- based musical. He 
is musical director of the 



the Boston Concert Opera National Center for Afro- 

and the Boston Symphony American Artists, the 

Youth programs. Bradford gi^j^ Lewis School of 

will perform works by pj^g ^rts and the First 

Donizetti, Schubert, Faure Parish Church of Brookhne 

and Gershwin, as well as and a panelist of the 

spirituals and old Duke National Endowment for 

the Arts. 



JIMMY JAY MUSIC 



Hollister has served as 



Guaranteed Lowest 

Prices on Cassettes, 

CDs and Records 



690 HANCOCK ST. _^^ _««« 
WOLLASTON 479-7080 



CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here'* a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Oulncy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Concert Opera, The Opera 
Co. of Boston, and 
Heritage Chorale and has 
toured Russia with the 
chorale ensemble Sharing 
a New Song. 

Sealy, a performer, 
teacher and brass 
instrument builder, has 
performed with the Alvin 
Alley Dance Theater, 
Boston Pops Orchestra, 
Opera Co. of Boston and 
the Filarmonica Jalisco, 
Guadalajara, Mexico. He 
is on the facuhy of Tufts 
University and Berkeley 
College of Music. 

Tickets are $7, $5 for 
seniors and children and 
will be available at the 



American Cancer Society's 
'Daffodil Days' March 23-24 



More than 150,000 
golden daffodils will burst 
into bloom in nine South 
Shore communities March 
23-24 as the South Shore 
Unit of the American 
Cancer Society stages its 
annual Daffodil Days to 
benefit the research, 
education and service 
programs to cancer 
patients throughout the 
area. 

"Last year people here 
bought nearly 140,000 
daffodils helping us raise 
over $57,000 and we hope 
to do better this year," 
Pauline Sweeney of 
Quincy, who, with her 
husband Dennis, again 



hope and help fight 
cancer." 

Advance orders are 
being taken up to March 5 
for the bright yellow 
flowers and volunteers will 
be delivering and selUng 
them beginning March 23. 
Orders may be placed by 
calling Mrs. Sweeney at 
773-8226 or the South 
Shore unit office, 341- 
4210. A bouquet of 10 is 
$5, and box of 500 is $250. 

The South Shore Unit of 
the Society provides 



programs which help 
cancer patients in Quincy, 
Braintree, Cohasset, 
Hingham, Hull, Milton, 
Norwell, Scituate and 
Weymouth, some 1400 
businesses and individuals 
have been contacted by 
volunteers for support. 

Statewide, the daffodil 
drive is expected to sell 
three million blooms 
raising more than the 

nearly $1,000,000 raised 
last year. 



String Quartet Concert Feb. 28 
At St. Chrysostom's Church 

The City of Presidents 



op. 74 no. 2; and music of 
door. For reservations or ^e^^s this year's effort. It string Qua^gt wUl present Hoagy Carmichael. The 
more information call 328- »« ^ wonderful way to greet ^^ third show of their City of Presidents String 
0677. spring with the flower of 1992.93 season Sunday, Quartet is comprised of 

Feb. 28 at 7 p.m. at St. 



2/11-2/17 



SCENT OFA 
WOMAN (R) 

12!l5-3a»7KI0 -10O6 

I LOADED WEAPON I 
(PG-13) 

12n0- 2:20- 4:40-7:21- IOKIO 
FRIt SAT ONLY 12:20 AM 

FSOMMERSBY (PG-13) 

1 1 i4S-2:ia4:» • 7:20 . 9«5 
FRI « SAT ONLY 12:1S AM 



SNIPER (R) 

12:15-4:30-10:00 



AUVE(R) 

11:48-7:15 
FRI t SAT ONLY 121SAM 



[A FEW GOOD MEN (R)1 

12:25 -3dB-7KI0- 0:60 
FRI «8AT ONLY 12ns AH 

fGRCXINHOG DAY (PG)' 

1 2K)0 - 2:1 - 4» - 7:18 ■ » A 
FRI tSAT 12:10 AM 

UNTAMED HEART 
(PG-IG) 

12:00- 2:15-4:30-7:10-«:a0 
FRI * SAT ONLY 12:10 AM 

THEVAMSHING(R) 

11«»4n84:3B-7:10-»S0 
FRI A SAT ONLY 12:10 AH 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Shows 

$3.75 

773-5700 



38TH ANNUAL SOUTH SHORE AT QUINCY 

ANTIQUES SHOW and SALE 





SNACK BAR 

Opens at 

5 p.m. Saturday 

1 1 a.m. Sun. -Mon. 



FEBRUARY 1993 



SAT 



13 

S p.ni. - 



SUN 



14 

12p.Ri.-S 



MON 



15 



11a.m.-S 



MASONIC TEMPLE, 1170 Hancock Street, Quincy 

Reduced Admission with this card 2.50 per person 
Sponsor 

WOLLASTON CHAPTER 
No. 156. O.E.S. 




Chrysostom's Church, 523 
Hancock St. 

The program, entitled 
"Music For a Midwinter 
Night," will include 
Beethoven's final quartet, 
op. 135, Haydn's quartet 



Dan Lee and George 
Vallatini, violins; Susan 
Hill, viola and Cameron 
Sawzin, cello. 

Tickets are $4 at the 
door. For more information 
call 786-9637. 



Show Telephone 
472-9638 

ALL ITEMS 
FOR SALE 



Beechwood Center 



Thursday, Feb. 11: 

Pre-Luncheon Exercise 
with Gini Waterman, 
11:15 to 11:45 a.m.; 
Lunch, please call 471- 
5712 for information and 
reservations, noon; Movie, 
"Moonstruck," cost 50 
cents, 1 p.m. 

Friday, Feb. 12: 
Walking Club with Nancy 




(three-mile walk), 9 a.m.; 
Gentle Walk, 10 a.m.; 
"Easy-Does-It" dance- 
exercise with instructor 
Gini Waterman, 10:15 to 
11 a.m.; Coed Volleyball, 
cost $2, 11 a.m. to 12:30 
p.m.; Line Dancing with 
Rita Sanford, cost $3, 
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 773-4600 




uccim^^ leister SUB 



Pizza - Pasta - Subs 

Syrians - Salads 

Dine In or Carry Out, or Delivered 



62-64 Billings Road, No. Quincy, MA 02171 
Hot Line 328-9764 • 328-0266 FAX 786-9792 




Wed&Thurs FeblGAII 

"A RIVER RUNS 

THROUGH FT" (PG) 

A Family Tal« About Life 

Eve's 7:00 only 



SrartsFri Feb 12 

Macaulay Culkin 

"HOME ALONE 2" (PG) 

AFamily Comedy 

Fri& Sat 7:00 4 9:15 

Sun-Thurs 7:00 only 



Mon & Tues Dollar Night 



ALL SEATS $3.00 



Thursday, February 11, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 9 



QUINCY TEACHER 
SALARIES FALL 

As of September, 1991, of the 325 teacher contracts reported to the Massachusetts Teachers Association, Quincy's 
pay for its most experienced, best prepared teachers ranked 166th in Massachusetts! In 1987, the same survey 
ranked Quincy's teacher pay 93rd; and back in the 1960's and 70's, Quincy consistently ranked in the top 10 in 
the state. Quincy's teacher morale has slid along with its pay ranking. Now, once again, your teachers are working 
without a contract. Quincy has not settled a contract "on time" with its teachers since 1973! This school year is 
half over, still with no contract in sight. 



Listed below are the 165 school systems that pay their teachers more than Quincy on the Master's 


Degree plus 30 credits with 12 or more years: 


Acton 


Canton 


Hamilton- Wenham 


Maltha's Vineyard 


Pembroke 


Taunton 


Acton-Boxborough 


Cape Cod Voc. 


Hampden- Wilbraham 


Masconomet 


Plymouth 


Tewksbury 


Amherst 


Carlisle 


Hanover 


Mashpee 


Plymouth-Carver 


Tisbury 


Amherst-Pelham 


Carver 


Harvard 


Maynaid 


Plympton 


Topsfield 


Andover 


Central Beikshires 


Harwich 


Medway 


PriiKeton 


Tri-County 


Ashbumham-Westminster 


Chelmsfoid 


Hingham 


Melrose 


Provincetown 


Triton 


Ashland 


Chilmaik 


Holbrook 


Millis 


Randolph 


Truro 


Assabet Valley Voc. 


Concord 


Holliston 


Milton 


Raynham 


Tyngsborough 


Auburn 


Concord-Carlisle 


Hopedale 


Minute Man Voc. 


Rehoboth 


Wachusett 


Avon 


Danvers 


Hopkinton 


Mount Greylock 


Revere 


Wakefield 


Ayer 


Dedham 


Hudson 


Nantucket 


Rockland 


Walpole 


Barnstable 


Dighton 


Hull 


Nashoba 


Rowley 


Wai« 


Bedford 




Ipswich 


Nashoba Valley Voc. 


Salisbury 


Watertown 


Beikshire Hills 


Dighton-Rehoboth 


King Philip Reg. 




Sandwich 


Wayland 


Berlin 


Dover 


Kingston 


Nauset 


Scituate 


Wellesley 


Berlin-Bolyston 


Dover-Sherbom 


Lee 


Needham 


Sherbom 


Wellfleet 


Beverly 


Dracut 


Lenox 


Newton 


Silver Lake 


West Bridgewater 


Billerica 


Duxbury 


Lexington 


Norfolk 


Somerville 


West Tisbury 


Bolton 


E. Longmeadow 


Lincoln 


North Andover 


South Middlesex 


Westborough 


Bourne 


Eastham 


Lincoln-Sudbury 


Nortbborough 


South Shore Voc. 


Westford 


Boxborough 


Edgartown 


Littleton 


Northborough- 


Southborough 


Weston 


B oxford 


Everett 


Longmeadow 


Southborough 


Southern Berkshire 


Westwood 


Braintree 


Falmouth 


Lunenburg 


Northeast Metro 


Stoneham 


Weymouth 


Brewster 


Foxborough 


Lynnfield 


Norwell 


Stoughton 


Whitman-Hanson 


Bridgewater-Raynham 


Framingham 


Maiden 


Norwood 


Stow 


Wilbraham 


Brockton 


Franklin 


Mansfield 


Oak Bluffs 


Sturbridge 


Wilmington 


Burlington 


Groton-Dunstable 


Marlborough 


Orleans 


Sudbury 


Winchester 


Cambridge 


Halifax 


Marshfield 


Pelham 


Tantasqua 


Wrentham 



The towns shaded in below pay their children's teachers more than the City of Quincy does — in many cases, thousands more! 




Quincy's ranking for entry-level teacher salaries is even 
worse! MTA research ranks Quincy's beginning Bachelor's 
level salary 296th of 325 reporting systems! With Quincy's 
lack of financial commitment to education, it's unlikely we 
can attract the best, and then keep the best, teachers in Quincy. 
We must stop this disturbing trend! 



Quincy's Teachers Want A Fair Settlement Now! 



Paid for by the Quincy Education Association 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 11, 1993 



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Spotlight On 
HEALTH 

AND 

FITNESS 




fK 



^ DO YOU KNOW IF 
-J^fct. ACUPUNCTURE 
^ CAN HELP 
YOU? 

If you have been suffering with a health problem 
like... 

• headache • neck, arm or leg pain 

• nervousness • shoulder or back pain 

• painful joints • sexual dysfunction 

• loss of sleep • addictions 

...you may have wondered whether or not acupuncture 

would be able to help you with the relief you have been 

looking for. 

Acupuncture care is covered by Wo±ers' Compensation and 

many major insurance companies. 

To find out if acupuncture health care can help you call: 

Acupuncture Associates 
of the South Shore 

471-5577 
Daniel S. Karp Licensed Acupuncturist 

12 DimmOCk St^ Quincy (in Quincy Sq. nor T Stadoo) 

• Prc-Sterilized Disposable Needles 



Medically 
Speaking 



by Michael M. Bakerman, M.D., FA.C.C. 




EXERCISE ZAPS DIABETES 



Chalk up another one for 
exercise. The "New England 
Journal of Medicine" has re- 
ported that researchers have 
found regular exercise to be 
effective in lowering the risk 
of getting adult diabetes. 
Mkldle-aged nien in the study 
reduced their risk of devel- 
oping the disease by six 
percent with every 500 
calories they burned weekly 
by exercise. Very active men 
who bumed some 3,500 
calories weekly cut their risk 
by neariy half. Vigorous ac- 
tivities like jogging or tennis 
were more effective in low- 
ering the risk than pastimes 
such as golf. The finding held 
true despite the presense of 
other risk factors, including 
obesity, advanced age, high 
blood pressure, or family 
history of diabetes. 

P.S. Adult diabetes, which 



occurs about as often in 
women as in men, affects 
12 million people in the U.S. 
Remember to stretch 
thoroughly before you em- 
bark on your morning work- 
out or jog, in order to mini- 
mize your risk of injury. If 
you would like to leam more 
about this topic, or how you 
can help prevent heart dis- 
ease, call COMPREHEN- 
SIVE CARDIAC CARE at 
472-2550. We are dedi- 
cated to the compassion- 
ate and caring practice of 
medicine. When treating 
patients, I always try to con- 
sider how I would like my- 
self, my wife and my children 
or my parents to be treated 
by a doctor. Office hours 
are by appointment at 101 
Adams St., Suite 24, in 
Quincy. I am affiliated with 
Quincy Hospital and South 
Shore Hospitals. 



February Is Heart 
Month At World Gym 



It's time for World 
Gym's 3rd annual "Dance 
for Hean" Aerobathon to 
benefit the American 
Heart Association. 

Kathleen Hassan, 
aerobic director at World 
Gym, began hosting the 
aerobathon two years ago, 
raising $2,200 the first 
year, and $3,700 last year. 
Hassan, whose parents 
both died of heart disease, 
chose aerobics to fight 
back against our nation's 
number one killer. 

This year the event will 
be Thursday, Feb. 18 from 
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Students 
will be pledged for their 
time, while working out to 
two master classes. 

World Gym is also 



hosting a Valentine's Open 
House Sunday, Feb. 14. 
The gym will offer prizes, 
membership specials, and 
a free S.O.S. (Starting Off 
Step) class at 11:30 a.m. 
The class will teach the 
basics of Step Training, 
with slower moves and 
lower music. 

Step Training is the 
latest in cardiovascular 
fitness, which incorporates 
stepping up and down on 
an adjustable bench. THR 
(Target Heart Rate) is 
monitored closely, to 
ensure safety and effective 
training of the heart and 
lungs. THR is explained at 
each class to help students 
achieve maximum aerobic 
benefits. 






UllillllJlillllMlliliulllMUiJuiOiii^^ 



Medical Watch 

Thursday, February 11, 7 pm, Friday, February 12,9 am, 

Monday, February 15, 1 pm, Tuesday, February 16, 7 pm, 

Wednesday, February 17, 9 am, Monday, Febniary 22, 1 pm 



[MIlIJlIlJTlUJLllllllflliUiillilJJ 



[fflmff 



what is a Normal Life Span? 

Have advances in medicine really made a significani 
dilference in the normal human life span? Qn we really find 
ihe "fountain of youth"? Join Dr. Robert Saltzman to learn 
more about what science can and cannot do in pushing the 
outer limits of human life. 

mn 1 [i I [Tinnuji iMmnuMDM 



gninnQimiii 
Quincy Hospital 






QCTV© 

LOCAL PnOCMUilMI«G FOR COMTffSHlaL CASLlVIICIM 

Community Television Channel 3 
Quincy-Milton-Randoipli 



m 



H 






r^ HEALTH STOP '" 
^^ BRAINTREE 



Health Stop./Braintree 

759 Granite Street 

Braintree, MA 02184 

(617) 848-1950 



Your Neighborhood Doctor's Office 



COMPLETE FAMILY 
HEALTH SERVICES 

• On Site Lab & X-Ray 

• Continuing Care for Hypertension, 
Diabetes, Asthma & Allergies 

• Minor Emergency Care 

• Women's Health Care 



Now Participating in 
Pilgrim Health Care 

and 
Tufts Managed Care 

David Egilman M.D., MPH Board Certified in 
Internal and Preventive/Occupational Medicine 



Mon-Fri 8 am-7pm • Sat 9am-3pm 

Qosed Monday February 15th 

No appointment Necessaiy 

We submit to Blue Shield, Medicare. 

Medicaid and other major insunu>ce plans 



Quincy Health Stop Patients: 
You may continue your medical care at 

Health Stop/Braintree, 
where your records are now available. 



How To Be Healthy 
With Acupuncture 



Throughout the past 
2,500 years more millions 
of people were helped by 
acupuncture than by all 
other medical modalities 
combined. It is unlikely 
that acupuncture would 
have survived for 
thousands of years if 
people did not see great 
value in this treatment 
method. According to the 
World Health 

Organization, acupuncture 
is one of most effective 
and safest methods known 
for diagnosis, therapy, and 
pain relief and is regarded 
of key importance for the 
prevention of illness. 

Research in the West 
has established that 
acupuncture induces the 
brain to produce morphine- 
like chemicals known as 
endorphins, which act as 
natural tranquilizers and 
pain relievers. Research 
has also shown that 
acupuncture is a 
bioelectric phenomenon, 
and that acupuncture 
points are sites of lower 
electrical skin resistance. 
Treatment is completely 
harmless and one cannot 
become "addicted" to 
acupuncture therapy. 

It is said that 
acupuncture is very 



effective for chronic pain. 
True, but it is equally 
effective in the regulation 
and normalization of 
ongoing body processes. 
That acupuncture can 
regulate internal body 
organs, correct oncoming 
disease and body 
imbalances has been 
known since ancient times. 
The World Health 
Organization has compiled 
a hst of common diseases 
that respond well to 
acupuncture treatment. 
This list includes diseases 
ranging from acute 
bronchitis, headache and 
migraine to frozen 
shoulder, tennis elbow, 
back pain, osteoarthritis, 
and many more. 

You don't have to 
believe in acupuncture. 
Some patients come to our 
clinic after everything else 
has failed, and may be 
very skeptical about 
acupuncture. These 
unbelievers will show the 
same good results, 
indicating that the 
acupuncture effect is not 
hypnotism or power of 
suggestion. 

For more information 
call Acupuncture 
Associates of the South 
Shore at 471-5577. 



JH 



Chiropractic 
Update 

by 

Mark C. Jaehnig D.C. 



WHAT TO DO ABOUT THAT BACK PAIN 

Most people will experience some degree of back pain at 
one time or another in their lifetime Experts point to the 
general trend in our society to do more and more sitting, 
coupled with a general decline in our level of physical 
fitness, as possible causes Regardless if the back pain is 
brought on by an accident, poor posture, straining while 
working around the house, or playing a sport, or by doing 
too much bending and lifting, there is a lot of confusion as 
to what to do for treatment 

There are some general recommendations that often 
prove helpful to patients suffering from lower back pain In 
my practice. I strongly urge patients to apply ice 
immediately after injuring their lower back. The ice tends 
- to reduce any swelling or inflammation while also serving 
as a natural pain reliever. People with lower back pain 
should avoid excessive sitting because the seated position 
dramatically increases the structural pressure of the lower 
back The recommended posture is known as the fetal 
position, whereby the patient lies on his/her side with both 
knees brought up toward their chest. Excessive exercise, 
bending, twisting and/or lifting should be avoided, as 
these actions tend to aggravate an injured lower back. 

While I have taken the liberty of ottering some basic 
suggestions on the care of back pain, there is no substitute 
for a thorough evaluation and examination to correctly 
diagnose the cause of the problem. The doctor of 
chiropractic, with intensive training and knowledge of the 
spina. IS eminently qualified to treat patients suffering 
from lower back pain. 

If you have questions or would lice to make an appointment, 
please call Dr. Mark Jaehnig, a lifekMig Quin<y resident, at 
Quincy Chiropractic Office, 1 1 Bilings Rd.. hterth Quincy MA 
02171,773-4400 



Walking: Ifs the path to better health 



Exercise. Ah, the dreaded word 
that inspires terror in couch potatoes 
everywhere. Of course, the benefits 
are obvious but, to many of us, the 
suggestion that physical exertion 
may actually be enjoyable is indeed 
suspect. 

But before you dismiss physical fit- 
ness as an ideal achieved only by 
sweaty, iron pumping tri -athletes with 
Greco-Roman physiques, consider 
this: Moderate exercise may include 
many of the same benefits, with higher 
compliance and fewer adverse effects, 
as do many physically-demanding 
activities. 

In fact, a study published in the 
Journal of the American Medical 
Association confirms the imjjortance of 
even a moderate exercise program. 
This study, conducted by the Institute 
for Aerobics Research, involved more 
than 13,000 men and women. Each 
participant was evaluated for physical 
fitness on a treadmill test, and then 
grouped into five categories from least 
to most fit. The study followed the 
groups over an eight-year period to dis- 
cover how physical fitness was related 
to death rates. 

The study revealed two major points: 

While previous studies had indicated 
physical exercise helps protect against 
heart disease, this was the first study to 
see a decline in death rates for cancer 
as well. 

The study also found that of the five 
groups of people, the least fit group 



(who were also the most sedentary) 
had the highest mortality rates. The 
big surprise was that the death rate 
dropped most sharply in the second 
least fit group, by 60 percent for men 
and 48 percent for women. The three 
fittest groups — including people who 
jogged up to 40 miles per week — 
derived relatively small additional 
benefits. 

In other words, exercise a little; and 
you'll benefit a lot. 

So, just what is moderate exercise? 
Many fitness experts suggest walking 
as the ideal moderate exercise. Today, 
walking is the fastest growing form of 
physical exercise among Americans, 
and it's estimated that 70 million of 
them are walking on a daily basis. 

Those who walk regularly report 
improved flexibility and strength, 
stronger bones, sounder sleep and a 
noticeable sense of well being. 

Walking is good for the soul — and 
one's mental well being. With compan- 
ions, walking is an enjoyable social 
activity; alone, it affords an opportuni- 
ty for reflection and renewal. Walking 
requires nothing more than a comfort- 
able pair of shoes, and offers minimal 
risk of injury, which is especially 
important for older adults. 

Studies have shown that brisk walk- 
ing bums almost as many calories as 
jogging, while walking up a 10-degree 
incline can bum more calories than 
jogging. 

So, grab a fiiend, lace up your shoes, 
and join the 70 million others like you 
who have discovered that walking is 



not only healthy; it's fun. 

For more information on walking, 
write to Step by Step, P.O. Box 32080, 
Kansas City, Missouri, 64111. To 
receive calcium information, call 
1 -(800) 3-rALCIUM. 



Thursday, February 11, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 11 

Heart Healthy Fair 
At Quincy Hospital 




Heart Healthy 
Fair 



February is National Heart 


MDNESDAY 


Month, oin us to learn how to take care of 


FEBRUARY 17, 1993 


yours Check your cholesterol and blood 


2-4PM 


pressure levels; learn hov to begin an 




exerdse program; and hear what 


Quincy Hospital 


cardiologi* from Heart Care Medical 


Education Center 


Center and Comprehensive Cardiac Care 


114 Whitwell Street, Quincy, MA 


have to say about heart health. 





This Quincy Hospital healii education program 
is offered free of charge as a public service. 



Call (617) 773-61(10, E)(L«16 
for reservations 



JTI Quincy 
Jl^JJH Hospital 



WELLNESS WEDNESDAY 




A FUN WORM 

for 

TOTS TO TEENS 



«^«««««4(4^«««¥¥««««¥«¥««««¥¥« 



* FOR BOYS 

» AGES 6 -14 



• FREE TRIAL LESSON * 
. ALL AGES ALL LEVELS * 

• SUPERB STAFF/EXPERIENCE » 
IS THE BEST TEACHER » 



Quincy Hospital will 
hold a Heart Healthy Fair 
Wednesday, Feb. 17 from 
2 to 4 p.m. in the hospital's 
Education Center. 

The fair will feature 
talks by cardiologists from 
Heart Care Medical 
Center and Comprehensive 
Cardiac Care. Jane Griffin, 
RD, registered dietitian at 
Quincy Hospital will be on 
hand with the most up to 
date information about 
heart healthy eating. Judy 
Keith, MS, PT, a physical 
therapist specializing in 
cardiac rehabilitation at 
the hospital, will provide 
information about how to 
begin an exercise program. 



Free blood pressure and 
cholesterol testing will be 
available. 

The Heart Healthy Fair 
is being presented by 
Quincy Hospital as part of 
its Wellness Wednesday 
program. This monthly 
health education and 
screening program focuses 
on a variety of topics of 
interest to the general 
public. The programs are 
presented free of charge as 
a pubUc service. 

To register, or for more 
information, call the 
Quincy Hospital Public 
Relations Department at 
773-6100, ext. 4016. 



?lHush Puppies 




Thewofid's 
shoes! 



Take 
a brisk 

power walk or 
just a stroll to the 
comer in the world's 
most comfortable walking 
shoe. Our patented Bounce Sole 
actually makes walking easier. 





HANLONS 

27B COTTAGE AVE^ QUINCY 472-4926 



SEPARATE TEACHERS 
FOR EACH PROGRAM 




B=: . IMPECCABLE REPUTATION 



PRE SCHOOL 

AGES3-5 
Lie. #17 



• FUN LEARNING 
ATMOSPHERE 

• SMALL CLASSES/ 
ACCORDING TO AGE 



EST. 
1962 



* 
221 PARKINGWAY* QUINCY » 

471-3808 ; 

4- 



YOUNG WORLD 



Call for Information 
VISITORS WELCOME 



Mon.-Frl. 9-4 
Sat. 9-3 



******************** 




Valentines Weekend 

SpecialT 

2 months unlimited membership! 

only %9^ 

Sale ends Monday February 15th at 8:00 p.m. 

OPEN HOUSE 

Sunday February 14, 1993 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. 

FREE (S.O.S. class) 
"Starting Of Step" open to public. 

The moves are slower the music is lower 

so come on in!! 

FREE coffee, bagels 

^ Valentines Atmosphere ^ 

Enjoy: 

Life Cycles Nordic Track 

Aerobics Sauna, Steam 

Reebock Step Shower 

Pro Shop/Juice Bar FREE Parking 



Nautilus 
Treadmills 
Stairmasters 
Free Weights 



2 month membership only ^69^ 

WORLD GYM 

Fitness & Aerobic Center 
472-9525 

95 Holmes Street No. Quincy 




Expires: 

2/15/93 



8€ 



J 



Page 12 Qulncy Sun Thursday, February 11, 1993 



Studds Hopeful Clinton Earmarks Cleanup Money 



Cont'd From Page J 

the last two years, it is 
going to be much more 
difficult now with the 
fiscal constraints that 
we're under, but we're 
going to iry for that again. 
"It is also terribly 
important that we met the 
governor last week in 
Washington, and Cong. 
Moakley and I and Sen. 
Kennedy and Sen. Kerry 
all made the point to the 
governor over and over 
again that this is a real 



crisis here. We are 
coming soon to the 
breaking point. 

"1 tried to convey to the 
governor what we perceive 
as an imminent crisis. We 
already have people who 
are in default on their 
local sewer bills for the 
simple reason that they 
cannot pay them. We're 
very hopeful the governor 
can find some significant 
assistance at the state 
level as well." 

Studds also commented 



PERM SPECIAL 

New Customers only 

$3000 

longer hair slightly higher 

(offer valid Tucs & Wed only) 



1 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



on several local and 
national issues which have 
received media attention. 
Here's what he had to say: 
Revitalizing the Quincy 
shipyard and est- 
ablishing a shipbuilding 
museum at Fore River 

"I think all of us hope 
very much that 
shipbuilding and ship 
repair work can once again 
be a component of the 
future of that yard and the 
city. We all know that's a 
long shot, we all know that 
it's not guaranteed. It's a 



little difficult to envision 
the future of this city 
without that and hopefully 
we won't have to. 

"Whether we do or 
whether we don't, the 
shipyard itself, that 
extraordinary parcel of 
land, with the deep water 
access, the rail access, 
and it's location is key to 
the future economic 
development of this city 
and this region. The 
museum is a wonderful 
component of that future. I 
know the mayor is full of 



Shooting Death 
Under Investigation 



PERFECT SOLUTION HAIR SALON I 



2 Wollaston Ave., Quincy 
328-9559 

Offer good thru March with coupon 



I 



Fine Handcrafts 

&^^^^^^ ^t FloralCreations 



Free demonstration on macrame' shamrock given by 

Pat Moscone on Wednesday, February 1 7th 6:30 - 7:30 pm 

Please feel free to drop in 

We now feature the works of over 72 crafters. 

Booth sizes still available 

773-4353 

1089 Hancock St., Quincy Center 



Police are still 
investigating the shooting 
death of a 22-year-old 
Quincy man that took 
place last Friday at the 
home of the victim's friend, 

Patrick GuUins died at 
Quincy Hospital one hour 
after being shot once in 
the heart by a .38-caliber 
pistol held by his friend 
Kevin Cunningham, 20, of 
Gilmoie St. in Wollaston. 
Cunningham has said the 
pistol fired accidentally 
while be was holding it. 

Lt. John McDonough 
said Tuesday a "packet of 
information" on the case 
was turned over to State 
Trooper Brian Howe who 
was to deliver the 
information to Norfolk 
County District Attorney 



Granite Auto Sales 

166 Washington St. 

Quincy, MA 02169 

. , , (617) 472-5501 



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* Price Reflects 1 ,000 Cash Down payment or 1 ,000 Trade 



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1987 Buick Regal Ltd 

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package 

2995* 



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^rd Taurus 
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1985 Nissan P/U 
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1989 Buick LeSabre Ltd 
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1987 Saab 900 
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1989 Mercury Grand 

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1986 Jeep Commanche P/U 
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1986 Plymouth Vouager 

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1988 Dodge Wagon 
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1985 Pontiac Grand Prix 
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1983 Lincoln Towncar 
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1986 Subaru XT 
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t Inciudes 12 Wointi/1 2^00 Mile ^itracai^^ 



William Delahunt. 

"He (Howe) is working 
very closely with us on 
this case," said 
McDcMiough. 

Police interviewed 
Monday the owner of the 
gun, a Milton man who 
has been described as an 
acquaintance of the 
Cunningham family. 
McDonough said Tuesday 
it would be left up to the 
district attorney as to to 
whether the man's name 
would be released and 
whether Cunningham 
would be charged with 
Gullins' death. 

GuUins was a 1989 
graduate of Quincy 
Vocational-Technical High 
School, where he studied 
welding. He worked for a 
fish business owned by his 
father, Patrick Gullins of 
Canton, and was searching 
for a full-time job as a 
welder. 
-MICHAEL WHALEN 



ideas about things he 
would like to see there. 

"The museum is 
certainly a wonderful first 
step." 

Quincy 2000 

Studds met Monday 
with Quincy 2000 
Chairman Thomas Galvin 
and Director Charles 
D'Aprix and was briefed 
about the public-private 
partnership's plans to boost 
business in Quincy 's retail 
districts. 

"It is in the interest of 
the city and all of us to 
work very closely together 
with one another. We 
pledged to work very, very 
closely. 

Clinton's controversial 
stand to lift ban on gays 
in the military 

Studds supports lifting 
the ban on gays in the 
miUtary. "1 think we have 
here the last chapter of the 
long story of the struggle 
for civil rights in this 
country. I think President 
CUnton is entirely correct 
in casting this debate in 
that context. 

"Thirty years ago I 
marched on Washington 
behind Martin Luther King 
Jr. as we began the last 
chapter of the legal quest 
for civil rights in America 
for the people of color. 
Thirty years later we're 
beginning to write the final 
chapter so that all 
Americans are included in 
the protections guaranteed 
by the Constitution and by 
the statutes in the laws of 
the land." 

Federal deficit 

Studds said he supports 
reduced spending on the 
$30 bilUon space station 




**Rockin into the 90y* 

D.J. STEVE KAVANAGH 
Music for all Occasions 



"Music for people who 

take their fun seriously r 

773-4936 




MANTIS 

645 HANCOCK ST. PHONE 328-6879 
WOLLASTON, MA 021 70 



A Rose Is A Rose 
NOT!!! 

Ever wonder how some florist shops and street 
venders can sell roses at those unbelievable prices? 
The answer is simply where the rose has been grown. 

Local roses are the most expensive, however they 
are the longest lasting and the most fragrant. You can 
e;q)ect to see them priced from 'SO^-^TO* a dozen 
depending on stem length. 

California roses are probably the next best bet if 
you can't find local grown roses. They will not have 
quite the longevity but are not a bad second choice. 
Price wise »30«'-»5a» will be the going rate, again 
depending on stem length. 

Finally, and only out of desperation or lack of 
funds, consider the South American Roses; longevity 
1-2 days; price-»15'»-»30* per dozen. 

Since this hoUday is very much subject to the laws 
of supply and demand, shop early for the best selec- 
tions in color and variety of valentine flowers. 



$1 Quincy Delivery guaranteed same day! 

FREE Wtddiog & Landscape consultation 

yisU our on premise greenhouse 



Freedom and the 
supercollider atom 
smasher in Texas as well 
as other cuts in the 
defense budget to help 
close the $300 billion 
federal deficit. 

As for cuts in Social 
Security, Studds said he 
doubts the president will 
follow through with a plan 
to curb cost of living 
adjustments. 

"I think it is entirely 
possible that in the context 
of across-the-board, 
everybody asked to bear a 
Uttle of the burden of the 
sacrifice which we're 
going to have if we're 
going to be serious about 
deficit reduction, then we 
might look at upper 
income recipients of 
Social Security in terms of 
making higher percentages 
in their Social Security 
income subject to taxes. 
That's my guess and that's 
much more likely to be a 
request from the President. 
I think that would be a 
fairer thing because you're 
asking people who can 
afford it to bear the burden 
rather than the poorest of 
the poor who would be 
affected by it." 

Family leave bill 
Studds is a strong 
supporter of the family 
leave legislation signed 
into law last week. The 
law requires companies 
with more than 50 
employees to give woricers 
up to 12 weeks of unpaid 
leave for family and 
medical emergencies, 
including a death or birth 
in a family. 

Fire 
Leaves 

Three 
Homeless 

A West Quincy family 
has been left temporarily 
homeless after a garage 
fire Monday afternoon 
caused $20,000 damage to 
their townhouse. 

Francis and Nancy 
Campbell of 210 Centre 
St. fled the fire, which was 
reported at 5:26 p.m. and 
declared out at 6:35 p.m., 
with their 1-year-old child. 
None of the family 
members were injured. 

Fire officials said the 
fire began after an 
extension cord in the 
garage apparently short- 
circuited. Much of the 
damage to the family's 
hving quarters was due to 
the fact that a door had 
been left ajar, which 
allowed much of the 
smoke and heat from the 
garage to enter the 
apartment, officials said. 

The Campbells will not 
be able to live in the 
townhouse, which was left 
without power, for a few 
days, according to 
officials. 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



Thursday, February 11, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 13 



OFF 




Any Valentine Cake (»i2«'min.) 

Offer good with coupon at location listed. 

One coupon per visit. Void where prohibited or restricted by law. 
Not valid in conjunction with any other offer. Valid thru 2/14/93 

Baskin(^Robbins 

Ice Cream & Itogurt 
■ 1434 Hancock St., Quincy Center 479-9564j 



AI A 1.'. LUL!J.!..t.yj..!.IJJL!.I.!. I .'. \ .'. I .!..f..!.I.I. I. ! .I. ; .. l .. ! X!J 



Happy Valentine^s Day 

Sunday, Feb. 14th 




Winficld 
Gift Emporium 



^B 



Hundreds of Unique Gift Ideas 
For Your Valentine 



Hour*: Tuct-Sai lt:M AM-SM PM 
Sundays I2.-M Noun-SM PM QiMcd Mondayt 



853 Hancock St., Quincy 479^9784 



HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 



Valentine Treats 

* balloon bouquets 

* valentine candy 

* valentine ice 
cream cakee 

* gift certificates 



68A Billings Rd. 
N. Quincy 



472-8558 



^'TTTT'l V I V I ..T ITiTIT-i-Ti- 1 ■j'TV 1 'i- 1 '.' 1 '.' » ^TYmyT 



BLACKWOOD „, 
PHARMACY ^ 

Offering FREE delivery 

Valentine's Special 

20% OFF 

Our Entire Stock 

of Russel Stover Candies and 

Ambassador Greeting Cards 

471-3300 

663 Hancock St. (corner of Beale St) WoIIaston 




T 



PHOTOGRAPHY BY MIKE RYAN 

Vatentines (Day SpeciaCX 

February 14, 1993 12pm-6pm 
Photo Packages 

The perfect opportunity for you and your 
sweetheart to express your love for each other. 

It's a nice idea for Valentine's but anyone 
can take advantage of these great prices! 

Packages starting at $10 
Also available 5x7 group photo only $5 

Please Call to reserve a time slot 
for yourself or your group 
770-1890 
1386 Hancock Street, Quincy 



>^i 



€a 



,>^<rVALENTINE DAY GIFTS'^o^i 

* Come see our parade of Valentine tote ' 
hags, small and large heart boxes filled 
with elegant chocolated or fresh cooked 
nuts. Novelties include chocolate roses, 
mailboxes and mugs. 

The 
Woll-Nut Shop 

17V2 Beale Street 

WoIIaston 
JTel. 770-0040 



Open Tues- Sat, 10-5 



|7'/!t Beale St 
WoIIaston 



a 



SULLIVAN'S CORNER 



Visit Our Large Shop at 
716 Hancock St., Quincy 
Unique Valentines Day Gifts 
• Antiques 

• Quality Used Fimiiture 
• China, Glass, 
Bric-A-Brac 
BOUGHT - SOLD 
Vincent P. Sullivan 
Appraiser - Auctioneer 

471-6086 

Hours: Men thru Sat 10 am-5:30 pm . 





PHASE 
II 

Valentine Special 
FREE Genuine Emerald 

loose stone with purchase of 
a 14k Claddagh ring 

Ladies 39^-89^ 
Mens 89'«-169^ 

(offer expires 3/5/93) 

Handmade "Quincy" Pottery 

Fill them up with gifts for your valentine 

Also available Handcrafted wood replicas 

of the Adams National Historic House 

1361 Hancock St 472-6618 





THE BIRD'S NEST 

696 HANCOCK ST., WOLLASTON 
(opposite Dunkin Donuts) 

DISCOUNT SAVINGS 
Embroidered Boston Sweatshirts only $20 

Come in and check out our Spring and Summer Clothing 

Shorts $1 Tee-shirts $8 (all sizes) 
Hours: Tues-Sat 1 am-6pm 328-3229 




THE QUALITY 
CONSIGNMENT SHOP 

66 BILLINGS RD. N. QUINCY 
328-1179 

Where the smart people shop! 

The Slash Is Back! 

Encore's Wonderful, Would you l^elleve 



/ 



50%offSaCei 

is now in progress 

Tickets marked with a red slash are fifty percent off 

our already ridiculously low prices! 

STORE HOURS CONSIGNMENT HOURS 

TUES. THRU SAT. WED.-AND SAT. 

10:00-5:00 10:00-2:00 



O'BRieNS 



B 



K E R 




rollow Cupid's Arrow to 

O'Brien's Bakery where 

you'll find Sweets For 

Your Sweetie On 

Valentine's Day!! 



Visit our bakery at 9 

Beale St. in WoIIaston 

where you're sure to 

adore our specials on 

cookie trays, assorted 

cup cakes, heart cakes 

and cookies. 

To phone in you order, call 472-4025. 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 11, 1993 



Obituaries 



Mary L. Wilson, 79 

Wartime Shipyard Welder 

funeral Mass for Robert Wilson of Newton; 



Mary L. (Phinney) Wilson, 
79, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Feb. 5 in St. 
Mary's Church. 

Mrs. WUson died Feb. 2 
at Quincy Hospital. 

During World War II, 
she was a welder at the 
Boston Naval Shipyard. 
She was subsequently a 
commercial cleaner in 
offices in Boston. 

Bom in Boston, she 
lived on the South Shore 
for most of her life. 

Wife of the late Peter 
D. Wilson, she is survived 
by two sons, Peter A. 
Wilson of California and 



three daughters, Jean R. 
Pittman, Louise G. 
Gouthro and Teresa J. 
Donahue, all of Quincy; 
two brothers, Thomas A. 
Phinney of West Roxbury 
and James L. Phinney of 
Dorchester; two sisters, 
Agnes Skidmore and 
Helen Stewart, both of 
Dorchester; nine 

grandchildren, and a great- 
grandchild. 

Burial was in the 
church cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 326 
Copeland St. 



Gertrude Tappen, 72 

Worked For Pharmaceutical Co. 



A funeral Mass for 
Gertrude (Rourke) Tappen, 
72, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Monday in Our 
Lady of Good Counsel 
Church. 

Mrs. Tappen died Feb. 4 
at Deaconess Hospital in 
Boston after a brief illness. 

A former quality control 
inspector for Copley 
Pharmaceutical Co. in 
Boston, she worked there 
for 17 years. 

Bom in Boston, she 
lived in Quincy for 48 
years. 

Wife of the late Harold 



A. Tappen, she is survived 
by two sons, Stephen P. 
Tappen of Dorchester and 
Paul W. Tappen of 
Quincy; two daughters, 
Barbara J. Mahar of 
Braintree and Carol L. 
DiLoreto of Hinpham- a 

sister, Mildred Jones of 
Quincy; and five 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



Joseph V. Valorz, 71 

Former Cemetery Dept. Foreman 

A funeral service for Legion Post 
Joseph V. Valorz, 71, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Monday in First Baptist 
Church of WoUaston. 

Mr. Valorz died Feb. 4 
at Quincy Hospital. 

He was fomier foreman 
and acting superintendent 
of ihe cemetery 
department for the City of 
Quincy. He worked 33 
years for the department 
before retiring in 1981. 

He subsequently worked 
11 years as a shuttle bus 
driver for the Flatley Co. 
and the National Fire 
Association. 

He was an Army 
veteran of World War U. 

He was a member of 
the John Quincy Adams 
Club and the Cyril P. 
Morrisette American 

Margaret F. Doucette, 84 

Nursing Home Nurse's Aide, Volunteer 



Bom in Quincy, he was 
a lifelong resident. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Mary A. (Sassi) 
Valorz; a son, Steven D. 
Valorz of Charlottesville, 
Va.; a daughter, Judith A. 
Osborne of Norwell; a 
brother, John Valorz of 
Hingham; five 

grandchildren, and several 
nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the New England Home 
for Little Wanderers, 850 
Boylston St., Brookline, 
MA 02146. 



A funeral Mass for 
Margaret F. "Pat" 
(Petrick) Doucette, 84, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Ffeb. 6 in St. Ann's Church. 

Mrs. Doucette died Feb. 
4 at Quincy Hospital after 
a long illness. 

She was a nurse's aide 
and volunteer at the 
Marion Manor nursing 
home in South Boston for 
12 years. 

Bom in New Jersey, she 
lived 57 years in Quincy. 



She is survived by her 
husband, Joseph A. "Bill" 
Doucette; a son, Gregory 
Doucette of New Salem; a 
daughter, Colette Doucette 
of Quincy; and a 
granddaughter. 

Burial was in St. 
Francis Xavier Cemetery, 
Weymouth. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 




SCOTT DEWARE 



A THOUGHT 
FOR THE WEEK 

VatonthM's Day Is for childran, 
lovara and romantics. Wsll, o»- 
•antlally, ysa, but when K comss 
to affairs of tha haart, svsryone 
Is inckidad. 

Valantinss na«d not be expen- 
slvs. A happy note written in your 
own handwriting ... a talsphone caN to someone who might 
not otherwisa recahre a call. 

Some people find H hard to say "I lovs you", Ixrt on 
Valsntlne's Day they axprass that aentlment with special 
remembrancos or gNla. It la also a day that "mushy" senti- 
ments on brightly colored paper are not really taken aerlously 
(l.e. Valentlnaa exchanged fay childran at school). There, the 
Important thing la the number of valentlnaa received, not the 
sentiment. As psople mature, the eantlment becomes more 
Important than the number. 

It takea only a little time to aand a valentine, or a note, or 
to make a telephone call to someone, eepeclally someone 
who Is a little "out of circulation" theee days. A little surprise 
gift will make that someone feel special, and you'll feel good 
tool 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Qiiincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the 'New England Funeral Trust"